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Characterisation of colorectal cancers showing hypermethylation at multiple CpG islands

Characterisation of colorectal cancers showing hypermethylation at multiple CpG islands Background and aims: A subgroup of colorectal cancers (CRC) referred to as the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP+) shows simultaneous methylation of multiple CpG islands. The clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of this phenotype remain uncertain however. Methods: We analysed methylation of CpG islands in the p16 and MDR1 genes and MINT-2 clone in 275 stage II/III CRCs. Results: Concurrent methylation of two or more CpG islands was observed in 32% of cases and was considered to represent CIMP+. These were often poorly differentiated, had less TP53 mutations, and originated frequently in the proximal or higher stage CRC compared with CIMP− tumours (p<0.05 for each). CIMP+ had no prognostic significance in stage II or stage III CRC treated by surgery alone. hMLH1 methylated tumours comprised the majority (81%) of cases with microsatellite instability, were frequently observed in older female patients, were often poorly differentiated or CIMP+, and contained wild-type K-ras (p<0.05 for each). Females who were heterozygous or homozygous for the C677T MTHFR polymorphism were at increased risk of developing CIMP+ CRC (odds ratio 2.17, 95% confidence interval 1.03–4.57; p=0.037). Conclusions: These observations made in a relatively large unselected series of CRC support the notion that CIMP+ characterises a subgroup of tumours with distinctive phenotypic features. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Gut British Medical Journal

Characterisation of colorectal cancers showing hypermethylation at multiple CpG islands

Gut , Volume 51 (6) – Dec 1, 2002

Characterisation of colorectal cancers showing hypermethylation at multiple CpG islands

Gut , Volume 51 (6) – Dec 1, 2002

Abstract


Background and aims: A subgroup of colorectal cancers (CRC) referred to as the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP+) shows simultaneous methylation of multiple CpG islands. The clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of this phenotype remain uncertain however.
Methods: We analysed methylation of CpG islands in the p16 and MDR1 genes and MINT-2 clone in 275 stage II/III CRCs.
Results: Concurrent methylation of two or more CpG islands was observed in 32% of cases and was considered to represent CIMP+. These were often poorly differentiated, had less TP53 mutations, and originated frequently in the proximal or higher stage CRC compared with CIMP− tumours (p<0.05 for each). CIMP+ had no prognostic significance in stage II or stage III CRC treated by surgery alone. hMLH1 methylated tumours comprised the majority (81%) of cases with microsatellite instability, were frequently observed in older female patients, were often poorly differentiated or CIMP+, and contained wild-type K-ras (p<0.05 for each). Females who were heterozygous or homozygous for the C677T MTHFR polymorphism were at increased risk of developing CIMP+ CRC (odds ratio 2.17, 95% confidence interval 1.03–4.57; p=0.037).
Conclusions: These observations made in a relatively large unselected series of CRC support the notion that CIMP+ characterises a subgroup of tumours with distinctive phenotypic features.

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References (43)

Publisher
British Medical Journal
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Gut
ISSN
0017-5749
eISSN
1468-3288
DOI
10.1136/gut.51.6.797
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background and aims: A subgroup of colorectal cancers (CRC) referred to as the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP+) shows simultaneous methylation of multiple CpG islands. The clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of this phenotype remain uncertain however. Methods: We analysed methylation of CpG islands in the p16 and MDR1 genes and MINT-2 clone in 275 stage II/III CRCs. Results: Concurrent methylation of two or more CpG islands was observed in 32% of cases and was considered to represent CIMP+. These were often poorly differentiated, had less TP53 mutations, and originated frequently in the proximal or higher stage CRC compared with CIMP− tumours (p<0.05 for each). CIMP+ had no prognostic significance in stage II or stage III CRC treated by surgery alone. hMLH1 methylated tumours comprised the majority (81%) of cases with microsatellite instability, were frequently observed in older female patients, were often poorly differentiated or CIMP+, and contained wild-type K-ras (p<0.05 for each). Females who were heterozygous or homozygous for the C677T MTHFR polymorphism were at increased risk of developing CIMP+ CRC (odds ratio 2.17, 95% confidence interval 1.03–4.57; p=0.037). Conclusions: These observations made in a relatively large unselected series of CRC support the notion that CIMP+ characterises a subgroup of tumours with distinctive phenotypic features.

Journal

GutBritish Medical Journal

Published: Dec 1, 2002

Keywords: colorectal cancer CpG island methylator phenotype hypermethylation

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