Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

How large are the productivity losses in contemporary patients with RA, and how soon in relation to diagnosis do they develop?

How large are the productivity losses in contemporary patients with RA, and how soon in relation... Objective To estimate the sick leave and disability pension trajectory in patients diagnosed with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 1999–2007, and in prevalent patients in 2007. Methods Individuals aged 19–59 years diagnosed with early RA were identified in the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register (1999–2007; n=3029; 47 years; 73% women). Additionally, prevalent patients in 2007 were identified in the National Patient Register (n=25 922; 52 years; 73% women). For each patient, five age-, sex-, education- and county-matched general population comparators were sampled. Sick leave and disability pension days were retrieved from national registers. Results Sick leave and disability pension increased from a mean 43 to 77 days/year from 2 to 1 years before RA diagnosis. A further increase to 147 days/year was observed the next year, followed by a rebound to 116 days/year 4 years after diagnosis. During the 4 years following diagnosis, sick leave decreased from a mean 118 to 35 and disability pension increased from 29 to 81 days/year. In the prevalent RA population, patients had a mean 158 annual days of sick leave and disability pension compared to 71 in comparators. Large variations existed across age, sex and education level, but RA patients had consistently higher levels. In 2007, the costs associated with sick leave and disability pension were €16 000 per patient with €9 000 attributable to RA. Conclusion Despite better drugs and improved treatment strategies, data from contemporary patients with early and established RA continue to indicate large unmet needs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases British Medical Journal

How large are the productivity losses in contemporary patients with RA, and how soon in relation to diagnosis do they develop?

How large are the productivity losses in contemporary patients with RA, and how soon in relation to diagnosis do they develop?

Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases , Volume 70 (6) – Jun 15, 2011

Abstract



Objective
To estimate the sick leave and disability pension trajectory in patients diagnosed with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 1999–2007, and in prevalent patients in 2007.


Methods
Individuals aged 19–59 years diagnosed with early RA were identified in the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register (1999–2007; n=3029; 47 years; 73% women). Additionally, prevalent patients in 2007 were identified in the National Patient Register (n=25 922; 52 years; 73% women). For each patient, five age-, sex-, education- and county-matched general population comparators were sampled. Sick leave and disability pension days were retrieved from national registers.


Results
Sick leave and disability pension increased from a mean 43 to 77 days/year from 2 to 1 years before RA diagnosis. A further increase to 147 days/year was observed the next year, followed by a rebound to 116 days/year 4 years after diagnosis. During the 4 years following diagnosis, sick leave decreased from a mean 118 to 35 and disability pension increased from 29 to 81 days/year. In the prevalent RA population, patients had a mean 158 annual days of sick leave and disability pension compared to 71 in comparators. Large variations existed across age, sex and education level, but RA patients had consistently higher levels. In 2007, the costs associated with sick leave and disability pension were €16 000 per patient with €9 000 attributable to RA.


Conclusion
Despite better drugs and improved treatment strategies, data from contemporary patients with early and established RA continue to indicate large unmet needs.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/british-medical-journal/how-large-are-the-productivity-losses-in-contemporary-patients-with-ra-WgoS6kCFuk

References (25)

Publisher
British Medical Journal
Copyright
Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions
ISSN
0003-4967
eISSN
1468-2060
DOI
10.1136/ard.2010.136812
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective To estimate the sick leave and disability pension trajectory in patients diagnosed with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 1999–2007, and in prevalent patients in 2007. Methods Individuals aged 19–59 years diagnosed with early RA were identified in the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register (1999–2007; n=3029; 47 years; 73% women). Additionally, prevalent patients in 2007 were identified in the National Patient Register (n=25 922; 52 years; 73% women). For each patient, five age-, sex-, education- and county-matched general population comparators were sampled. Sick leave and disability pension days were retrieved from national registers. Results Sick leave and disability pension increased from a mean 43 to 77 days/year from 2 to 1 years before RA diagnosis. A further increase to 147 days/year was observed the next year, followed by a rebound to 116 days/year 4 years after diagnosis. During the 4 years following diagnosis, sick leave decreased from a mean 118 to 35 and disability pension increased from 29 to 81 days/year. In the prevalent RA population, patients had a mean 158 annual days of sick leave and disability pension compared to 71 in comparators. Large variations existed across age, sex and education level, but RA patients had consistently higher levels. In 2007, the costs associated with sick leave and disability pension were €16 000 per patient with €9 000 attributable to RA. Conclusion Despite better drugs and improved treatment strategies, data from contemporary patients with early and established RA continue to indicate large unmet needs.

Journal

Annals of the Rheumatic DiseasesBritish Medical Journal

Published: Jun 15, 2011

There are no references for this article.