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Multicentre study of cancer pain and its treatment in France

Multicentre study of cancer pain and its treatment in France Abstract Objective: To describe the treatment of cancer pain in France and to evaluate the predictive factors for inadequate management. Design: Multicentre, representative cross sectional survey. Setting: 20 treatment centres, including cancer centres, university hospitals, state hospitals, private clinics, and one homecare setting (in which patients are supported at home). Subjects: 605 patients with cancer. Main measures: Patients rated prevalence and severity of pain and functional impairment related to pain. Doctors reported patients' cancer characteristic, performance status, pain severity, and analgesic drugs ordered. Results: 57% (340/601) of patients with cancer reported pain due to their disease, and, of those with pain, 69% (224/325) rated their worst pain at a level that impaired their ability to function. 30% (84/279) were reported as receiving no drugs for their pain. Of the 270 patients in pain for whom information on treatment was available 51% (137/270) were not receiving adequate pain relief, according to an index based on the World Health Organisation's guidelines. French doctors were found to underestimate the severity of their patients' pain. Younger patients, patients without metastatic disease, patients with a better performance status, and patients who rated their pain as more severe than their doctors did were at greater risk for undertreatment of their pain. Conclusions: In the light of the high prevalence and the severity of pain among patients with cancer, the assessment and treatment of cancer pain in France remain inadequate, emphasising the need for changes in patient care. Key messages Key messages Data on prevalence, severity, and treatment of pain in patients with cancer are fragmentary This national French study shows that pain is present in over half of cancer patients, that more than two thirds rate their worst pain as impairing their ability to function, and that half of patients in pain do not receive adequate treatment Doctors underestimate the severity of their patients' cancer pain and provide inadequate treatment These results are useful baseline data against which to evaluate future programmes for the control of cancer pain in France http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BMJ British Medical Journal

Multicentre study of cancer pain and its treatment in France

BMJ , Volume 310 (6986) – Apr 22, 1995

Multicentre study of cancer pain and its treatment in France

BMJ , Volume 310 (6986) – Apr 22, 1995

Abstract


Abstract
Objective: To describe the treatment of cancer pain in France and to evaluate the predictive factors for inadequate management.
Design: Multicentre, representative cross sectional survey.
Setting: 20 treatment centres, including cancer centres, university hospitals, state hospitals, private clinics, and one homecare setting (in which patients are supported at home).
Subjects: 605 patients with cancer.
Main measures: Patients rated prevalence and severity of pain and functional impairment related to pain. Doctors reported patients' cancer characteristic, performance status, pain severity, and analgesic drugs ordered.
Results: 57% (340/601) of patients with cancer reported pain due to their disease, and, of those with pain, 69% (224/325) rated their worst pain at a level that impaired their ability to function. 30% (84/279) were reported as receiving no drugs for their pain. Of the 270 patients in pain for whom information on treatment was available 51% (137/270) were not receiving adequate pain relief, according to an index based on the World Health Organisation's guidelines. French doctors were found to underestimate the severity of their patients' pain. Younger patients, patients without metastatic disease, patients with a better performance status, and patients who rated their pain as more severe than their doctors did were at greater risk for undertreatment of their pain.
Conclusions: In the light of the high prevalence and the severity of pain among patients with cancer, the assessment and treatment of cancer pain in France remain inadequate, emphasising the need for changes in patient care.

Key messages

Key messages
Data on prevalence, severity, and treatment of pain in patients with cancer are fragmentary
This national French study shows that pain is present in over half of cancer patients, that more than two thirds rate their worst pain as impairing their ability to function, and that half of patients in pain do not receive adequate treatment
Doctors underestimate the severity of their patients' cancer pain and provide inadequate treatment
These results are useful baseline data against which to evaluate future programmes for the control of cancer pain in France


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References (16)

Publisher
British Medical Journal
Copyright
© 1995 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.
ISSN
0959-8138
eISSN
1468-5833
DOI
10.1136/bmj.310.6986.1034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Objective: To describe the treatment of cancer pain in France and to evaluate the predictive factors for inadequate management. Design: Multicentre, representative cross sectional survey. Setting: 20 treatment centres, including cancer centres, university hospitals, state hospitals, private clinics, and one homecare setting (in which patients are supported at home). Subjects: 605 patients with cancer. Main measures: Patients rated prevalence and severity of pain and functional impairment related to pain. Doctors reported patients' cancer characteristic, performance status, pain severity, and analgesic drugs ordered. Results: 57% (340/601) of patients with cancer reported pain due to their disease, and, of those with pain, 69% (224/325) rated their worst pain at a level that impaired their ability to function. 30% (84/279) were reported as receiving no drugs for their pain. Of the 270 patients in pain for whom information on treatment was available 51% (137/270) were not receiving adequate pain relief, according to an index based on the World Health Organisation's guidelines. French doctors were found to underestimate the severity of their patients' pain. Younger patients, patients without metastatic disease, patients with a better performance status, and patients who rated their pain as more severe than their doctors did were at greater risk for undertreatment of their pain. Conclusions: In the light of the high prevalence and the severity of pain among patients with cancer, the assessment and treatment of cancer pain in France remain inadequate, emphasising the need for changes in patient care. Key messages Key messages Data on prevalence, severity, and treatment of pain in patients with cancer are fragmentary This national French study shows that pain is present in over half of cancer patients, that more than two thirds rate their worst pain as impairing their ability to function, and that half of patients in pain do not receive adequate treatment Doctors underestimate the severity of their patients' cancer pain and provide inadequate treatment These results are useful baseline data against which to evaluate future programmes for the control of cancer pain in France

Journal

BMJBritish Medical Journal

Published: Apr 22, 1995

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