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Palliative Care Ethics: A Good Companion

Palliative Care Ethics: A Good Companion Views & reviews Medicine and books concerns about the style and potential intru­ outcomes but also on qualitative assessment Palliative Care Ethics: A Good siveness of some professionals' behaviour. of their effect on individuals and their Companion They challenge the teaching of “communi­ families. Fiona Randall, R S Downie cation skills” if the end result is feigned Inevitably, this book does not address all Oxford University Press, £19.50, pp 160 behaviour rather than natural, spontaneous the burning issues in genetics. Keeping ISBN0192626329 interaction. The authors argue that no abreast of scientific developments and avoid­ shared knowledge base exists for normal ing the hype that surrounds them is a near Currently, society is trying to cope with human emotions and that we rely on our impossible task, but, as the number of patients medicine's rapidly increasing knowledge own experiences to help us in this domain. seeking advice from genetic centres and their base and technological sophistication, while When being taught communication general practitioners increase, it is vital to recognising the need to respect individuals skills, some medical students feel uncom­ brush up or acquire at least a basic knowledge and their rights. We urgently need to clarify fortable with the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BMJ British Medical Journal

Palliative Care Ethics: A Good Companion

BMJ , Volume 316 (7147) – Jun 13, 1998

Palliative Care Ethics: A Good Companion

BMJ , Volume 316 (7147) – Jun 13, 1998

Abstract

Views & reviews Medicine and books concerns about the style and potential intru­ outcomes but also on qualitative assessment Palliative Care Ethics: A Good siveness of some professionals' behaviour. of their effect on individuals and their Companion They challenge the teaching of “communi­ families. Fiona Randall, R S Downie cation skills” if the end result is feigned Inevitably, this book does not address all Oxford University Press, £19.50, pp 160 behaviour rather than natural, spontaneous the burning issues in genetics. Keeping ISBN0192626329 interaction. The authors argue that no abreast of scientific developments and avoid­ shared knowledge base exists for normal ing the hype that surrounds them is a near Currently, society is trying to cope with human emotions and that we rely on our impossible task, but, as the number of patients medicine's rapidly increasing knowledge own experiences to help us in this domain. seeking advice from genetic centres and their base and technological sophistication, while When being taught communication general practitioners increase, it is vital to recognising the need to respect individuals skills, some medical students feel uncom­ brush up or acquire at least a basic knowledge and their rights. We urgently need to clarify fortable with the

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Publisher
British Medical Journal
Copyright
© 1998 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.
ISSN
0959-8138
eISSN
1468-5833
DOI
10.1136/bmj.316.7147.1839
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Views & reviews Medicine and books concerns about the style and potential intru­ outcomes but also on qualitative assessment Palliative Care Ethics: A Good siveness of some professionals' behaviour. of their effect on individuals and their Companion They challenge the teaching of “communi­ families. Fiona Randall, R S Downie cation skills” if the end result is feigned Inevitably, this book does not address all Oxford University Press, £19.50, pp 160 behaviour rather than natural, spontaneous the burning issues in genetics. Keeping ISBN0192626329 interaction. The authors argue that no abreast of scientific developments and avoid­ shared knowledge base exists for normal ing the hype that surrounds them is a near Currently, society is trying to cope with human emotions and that we rely on our impossible task, but, as the number of patients medicine's rapidly increasing knowledge own experiences to help us in this domain. seeking advice from genetic centres and their base and technological sophistication, while When being taught communication general practitioners increase, it is vital to recognising the need to respect individuals skills, some medical students feel uncom­ brush up or acquire at least a basic knowledge and their rights. We urgently need to clarify fortable with the

Journal

BMJBritish Medical Journal

Published: Jun 13, 1998

There are no references for this article.