Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Editors' Notes

Editors' Notes Editors' Notes he articles in volume XXXIV of the Austrian History Yearbook evidence the breadth and vitality of historical research on the lands of the Habs- T burg monarchy and its successor states. Several of the essays also demonstrate the exciting new work that scholars have been able to undertake in the archives of the postcommunist lands in Central and East Central Europe on topics such as ethnic identity, minorities, and national and ethnic conflict that were often taboo under the pre-1989 governments. The volume begins, as has been the custom since volume XXII (1991), with the Robert A. Kann Memorial Lecture, this year a subtle, multilayered discussion of the Revolution of 1918 in Austria by John W. Boyer. The contributions to the forum, "A City of Many Names: Lemberg/Lwow/L'viv/L'vov—Nationalizing in an Urban Context," show how the development of group loyalties, social solidarities, and community life for each of the ethnic groups in the former capital of Aus- trian Galicia can only be understood with reference to the interactions with the neighboring groups and the other groups' experiences. The processes of form- ing ethnic and national group loyalties and the politics of ethnic identity and state loyalty also figure http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Austrian History Yearbook Cambridge University Press

Editors' Notes

Austrian History Yearbook , Volume 34: 1 – Feb 10, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/cambridge-university-press/editors-apos-notes-0HQOcC4prw
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for Austrian Studies, University of Minnesota 2003
ISSN
0067-2378
eISSN
1558-5255
DOI
10.1017/S0067237800020415
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editors' Notes he articles in volume XXXIV of the Austrian History Yearbook evidence the breadth and vitality of historical research on the lands of the Habs- T burg monarchy and its successor states. Several of the essays also demonstrate the exciting new work that scholars have been able to undertake in the archives of the postcommunist lands in Central and East Central Europe on topics such as ethnic identity, minorities, and national and ethnic conflict that were often taboo under the pre-1989 governments. The volume begins, as has been the custom since volume XXII (1991), with the Robert A. Kann Memorial Lecture, this year a subtle, multilayered discussion of the Revolution of 1918 in Austria by John W. Boyer. The contributions to the forum, "A City of Many Names: Lemberg/Lwow/L'viv/L'vov—Nationalizing in an Urban Context," show how the development of group loyalties, social solidarities, and community life for each of the ethnic groups in the former capital of Aus- trian Galicia can only be understood with reference to the interactions with the neighboring groups and the other groups' experiences. The processes of form- ing ethnic and national group loyalties and the politics of ethnic identity and state loyalty also figure

Journal

Austrian History YearbookCambridge University Press

Published: Feb 10, 2009

There are no references for this article.