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First observations on needle ice formation in the sub-Antarctic

First observations on needle ice formation in the sub-Antarctic sThe temperature regime on Marion Island in the sub-Antarctic is highly conducive to the occurrence of diurnal soil frost and needle ice growth (Holness 2003). Needle ice is the usual term applied to the accumulation of slender, bristle-like ice crystals (needles) practically at, or immediately beneath, the surface of the ground (Washburn 1979). High annual frequencies of needle ice growth on Marion, and possibly other sub-Antarctic islands, have been shown to result in high rates of soil heave and surficial soil creep (Boelhouwers et al. 2003). Furthermore, needle ice growth impacts on the keystone fellfield Azorella selago Hook f. species by means of increased seedling mortality (McGeoch et al. 2008), lee-side turf-exfoliation of A. selago cushions (Boelhouwers et al. 2003) and small-scale spatial variability in sediment erosion and accumulation and associated landform development (Haussmann et al. 2009).sConditions for needle ice initiation are reached when heat loss from the soil to the air results in cooling to the freezing point of the near-surface soil water. This is principally by surface radiative cooling which preferentially occurs during clear and windless nights but, in maritime locations (like that of sub-Antarctic islands), cooling of the soil surface may theoretically also be affected by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Antarctic Science Cambridge University Press

First observations on needle ice formation in the sub-Antarctic

Antarctic Science , Volume 26 (3): 2 – Oct 18, 2013

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References (15)

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Antarctic Science Ltd 2013 
ISSN
1365-2079
eISSN
0954-1020
DOI
10.1017/S0954102013000722
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

sThe temperature regime on Marion Island in the sub-Antarctic is highly conducive to the occurrence of diurnal soil frost and needle ice growth (Holness 2003). Needle ice is the usual term applied to the accumulation of slender, bristle-like ice crystals (needles) practically at, or immediately beneath, the surface of the ground (Washburn 1979). High annual frequencies of needle ice growth on Marion, and possibly other sub-Antarctic islands, have been shown to result in high rates of soil heave and surficial soil creep (Boelhouwers et al. 2003). Furthermore, needle ice growth impacts on the keystone fellfield Azorella selago Hook f. species by means of increased seedling mortality (McGeoch et al. 2008), lee-side turf-exfoliation of A. selago cushions (Boelhouwers et al. 2003) and small-scale spatial variability in sediment erosion and accumulation and associated landform development (Haussmann et al. 2009).sConditions for needle ice initiation are reached when heat loss from the soil to the air results in cooling to the freezing point of the near-surface soil water. This is principally by surface radiative cooling which preferentially occurs during clear and windless nights but, in maritime locations (like that of sub-Antarctic islands), cooling of the soil surface may theoretically also be affected by

Journal

Antarctic ScienceCambridge University Press

Published: Oct 18, 2013

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