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HOW TO ALLOCATE SCARCE HEALTH RESOURCES WITHOUT DISCRIMINATING AGAINST PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

HOW TO ALLOCATE SCARCE HEALTH RESOURCES WITHOUT DISCRIMINATING AGAINST PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Abstract: One widely used method for allocating health care resources involves the use of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) to rank treatments in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. CEA has been criticized for discriminating against people with disabilities by valuing their lives less than those of non-disabled people. Avoiding discrimination seems to lead to the 'QALY trap': we cannot value saving lives equally and still value raising quality of life. This paper reviews existing responses to the QALY trap and argues that all are problematic. Instead, we argue that adopting a moderate form of prioritarianism avoids the QALY trap and disability discrimination. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Economics & Philosophy Cambridge University Press

HOW TO ALLOCATE SCARCE HEALTH RESOURCES WITHOUT DISCRIMINATING AGAINST PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

Economics & Philosophy , Volume 33 (2): 26 – Nov 23, 2016

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References (55)

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016
ISSN
1474-0028
eISSN
0266-2671
DOI
10.1017/S0266267116000237
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: One widely used method for allocating health care resources involves the use of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) to rank treatments in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. CEA has been criticized for discriminating against people with disabilities by valuing their lives less than those of non-disabled people. Avoiding discrimination seems to lead to the 'QALY trap': we cannot value saving lives equally and still value raising quality of life. This paper reviews existing responses to the QALY trap and argues that all are problematic. Instead, we argue that adopting a moderate form of prioritarianism avoids the QALY trap and disability discrimination.

Journal

Economics & PhilosophyCambridge University Press

Published: Nov 23, 2016

Keywords: QALY; disability; priority setting; health care; prioritarianism

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