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New on Paternalism

New on Paternalism Individuals often seem to misjudge their own interests. One reason is inadequate information. Other reasons are failures of reasoning and volition. These reasons have all been construed as paternalist motives for the state to intervene. But in a recent article in this journal, New (1999), criticizes earlier accounts of paternalism. He argues that imperfect information constitutes a standard form of market failure, and consequently policies that respond to it do not require a paternalist motivation. The purpose of this note is to evaluate New's claim. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Economics & Philosophy Cambridge University Press

New on Paternalism

Economics & Philosophy , Volume 16 (2): 7 – Nov 9, 2000

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References (3)

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
© 2000 Cambridge University Press
ISSN
1474-0028
eISSN
0266-2671
DOI
10.1017/S0266267100000274
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Individuals often seem to misjudge their own interests. One reason is inadequate information. Other reasons are failures of reasoning and volition. These reasons have all been construed as paternalist motives for the state to intervene. But in a recent article in this journal, New (1999), criticizes earlier accounts of paternalism. He argues that imperfect information constitutes a standard form of market failure, and consequently policies that respond to it do not require a paternalist motivation. The purpose of this note is to evaluate New's claim.

Journal

Economics & PhilosophyCambridge University Press

Published: Nov 9, 2000

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