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Reviews 1.INTRODUCTIONIn consideration of whether or not this is a good time in human history to be alive, we are faced with two observations. The first: overall, things seem to be much better. Human beings have never lived as long as they do now and economic prosperity is enjoyed by a greater number of individuals than ever before in recorded history. The second: our world today is a highly unequal one, where the country into which one is born can add or remove decades from one's life expectancy, and large proportions of the global population continue to die from illnesses from which other parts of the world have been free for decades. The engine of material progress that has resulted in unprecedented prosperity for many has also left many others behind, opening up large inequalities as portions of the human population secure a ‘great escape’ from poverty and low life expectancy.Angus Deaton's book dissects this tension in fascinating detail, unpacking the relationship between progress and inequality with the use of data and historical analysis. Written in a highly accessible style and aimed at a lay audience, Deaton engages his reader across a wide terrain of issues, oftentimes in great detail, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Economics & Philosophy Cambridge University Press

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Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 
ISSN
1474-0028
eISSN
0266-2671
DOI
10.1017/S0266267115000048
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1.INTRODUCTIONIn consideration of whether or not this is a good time in human history to be alive, we are faced with two observations. The first: overall, things seem to be much better. Human beings have never lived as long as they do now and economic prosperity is enjoyed by a greater number of individuals than ever before in recorded history. The second: our world today is a highly unequal one, where the country into which one is born can add or remove decades from one's life expectancy, and large proportions of the global population continue to die from illnesses from which other parts of the world have been free for decades. The engine of material progress that has resulted in unprecedented prosperity for many has also left many others behind, opening up large inequalities as portions of the human population secure a ‘great escape’ from poverty and low life expectancy.Angus Deaton's book dissects this tension in fascinating detail, unpacking the relationship between progress and inequality with the use of data and historical analysis. Written in a highly accessible style and aimed at a lay audience, Deaton engages his reader across a wide terrain of issues, oftentimes in great detail,

Journal

Economics & PhilosophyCambridge University Press

Published: May 7, 2015

References