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Sound Art and the Sonic Unconscious

Sound Art and the Sonic Unconscious This essay develops an ontology of sound and argues that sound art plays a crucial role in revealing this ontology. I argue for a conception of sound as a continuous, anonymous flux to which human expressions contribute but which precedes and exceeds these expressions. Developing Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz’s conception of the perceptual unconscious, I propose that this sonic flux is composed of two dimensions: a virtual dimension that I term ‘noise’ and an actual dimension that consists of contractions of this virtual continuum: for example, music and speech. Examining work by Max Neuhaus, Chris Kubick, Francisco Lopez and others, I suggest that the richest works of sound art help to disclose the virtual dimension of sound and its process of actualisation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Organised Sound Cambridge University Press

Sound Art and the Sonic Unconscious

Organised Sound , Volume 14 (1): 8 – Apr 1, 2009

Sound Art and the Sonic Unconscious

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Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009
ISSN
1469-8153
eISSN
1355-7718
DOI
10.1017/S1355771809000041
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This essay develops an ontology of sound and argues that sound art plays a crucial role in revealing this ontology. I argue for a conception of sound as a continuous, anonymous flux to which human expressions contribute but which precedes and exceeds these expressions. Developing Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz’s conception of the perceptual unconscious, I propose that this sonic flux is composed of two dimensions: a virtual dimension that I term ‘noise’ and an actual dimension that consists of contractions of this virtual continuum: for example, music and speech. Examining work by Max Neuhaus, Chris Kubick, Francisco Lopez and others, I suggest that the richest works of sound art help to disclose the virtual dimension of sound and its process of actualisation.

Journal

Organised SoundCambridge University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.