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The Antarctic ozone hole, ultraviolet radiation and bushfires

The Antarctic ozone hole, ultraviolet radiation and bushfires sIn the 1980s, British Antarctic scientists (Farman et al. 1985) discovered the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica, and we are now familiar with images of springtime ozone depletion extending beyond the continental margins (Fig. 1a). The largest Antarctic ozone hole occurred in 2006 (Fig. 1b), but in recent years recovery has started to become apparent, with the total column ozone predicted to return to 1980 levels by 2066 (WMO 2022). However, there is still reason to be concerned about the timing and extent of ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure in Antarctica, as well as how ozone recovery may be jeopardized by climate change-mediated events such as wildfires.sFig. 1.Antarctic ozone depletion. a. Monthly averaged total ozone over the South Pole for October 2022. b. Graphs showing yearly variation in ozone hole area and minimum ozone depth each year since 1979 (red bars indicating largest area and lowest ozone depth in the top and bottom graphs, respectively). c. The progress of the ozone hole for 2022 (black line) with grey shading indicating the maximum and minimum areas measured since 1979 and the white line indicating the mean values (red numbers indicate the maximum area in 2022). Note: No data were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Antarctic Science Cambridge University Press

The Antarctic ozone hole, ultraviolet radiation and bushfires

Antarctic Science , Volume 35 (2): 3 – Apr 1, 2023
3 pages

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Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2023. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Antarctic Science Ltd
ISSN
0954-1020
eISSN
1365-2079
DOI
10.1017/S0954102023000081
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

sIn the 1980s, British Antarctic scientists (Farman et al. 1985) discovered the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica, and we are now familiar with images of springtime ozone depletion extending beyond the continental margins (Fig. 1a). The largest Antarctic ozone hole occurred in 2006 (Fig. 1b), but in recent years recovery has started to become apparent, with the total column ozone predicted to return to 1980 levels by 2066 (WMO 2022). However, there is still reason to be concerned about the timing and extent of ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure in Antarctica, as well as how ozone recovery may be jeopardized by climate change-mediated events such as wildfires.sFig. 1.Antarctic ozone depletion. a. Monthly averaged total ozone over the South Pole for October 2022. b. Graphs showing yearly variation in ozone hole area and minimum ozone depth each year since 1979 (red bars indicating largest area and lowest ozone depth in the top and bottom graphs, respectively). c. The progress of the ozone hole for 2022 (black line) with grey shading indicating the maximum and minimum areas measured since 1979 and the white line indicating the mean values (red numbers indicate the maximum area in 2022). Note: No data were

Journal

Antarctic ScienceCambridge University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2023

Keywords: Antarctica; bushfires; climate change; climate forcing; ozone depletion; sea ice; ultraviolet-B radiation; UV-B

References