Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Yield stability of cassava, maize, soya bean and cowpea intercrops

Yield stability of cassava, maize, soya bean and cowpea intercrops The yield stability of intercropping systems is important in developing cropping systems that produce economic yields over a wide range of environments. Field studies were conducted during the 1997/98 and 1998/99 growing seasons at three locations in the forest and forest–savannah transition zones of Ghana to determine yield, land use efficiency and yield stability of cassava (Manihot esculenta), maize (Zea mays), soya bean (Glycine max) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) intercrop systems. The cropping systems consisted of a factorial combination of two cassava varieties: ‘Gblemoduade’ (an improved, highly branched variety) and ‘Ankra’ (a local variety with fewer branches) and three spatial arrangements. Cowpea rows were planted in the minor season into cassava as a successive crop to maize and soya bean after their harvest in the major season. Intercropping significantly reduced grain or tuber yield of maize, cassava ‘Gblemoduade’ and cassava ‘Ankra’ by 23–70%, 16–49% and 24–64%, respectively. Maize yield decreased with increased number of soya bean rows. ‘Gblemoduade’ outyielded ‘Ankra’ by more than 100% under both intercrop and sole crop. The yield of soya bean increased with increased number of soya bean rows, but did not differ in response to the cassava variety. However, cowpea yield was higher when intercropped with ‘Ankra’ than with ‘Gblemoduade’. The intercrops had higher land use ratios (LER=1·27–2·83) and were more stable than the sole crops. Intercrops involving ‘Ankra’ had higher LER (2·14–2·18) than systems with ‘Gblemoduade’ (LER=1·83–1·99), but their yield stabilities were similar. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Agricultural Science Cambridge University Press

Yield stability of cassava, maize, soya bean and cowpea intercrops

Journal of Agricultural Science , Volume 140 (1): 10 – Apr 17, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/cambridge-university-press/yield-stability-of-cassava-maize-soya-bean-and-cowpea-intercrops-pPZ89YIxjf

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
© 2003 Cambridge University Press
ISSN
0021-8596
eISSN
1469-5146
DOI
10.1017/S0021859602002770
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The yield stability of intercropping systems is important in developing cropping systems that produce economic yields over a wide range of environments. Field studies were conducted during the 1997/98 and 1998/99 growing seasons at three locations in the forest and forest–savannah transition zones of Ghana to determine yield, land use efficiency and yield stability of cassava (Manihot esculenta), maize (Zea mays), soya bean (Glycine max) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) intercrop systems. The cropping systems consisted of a factorial combination of two cassava varieties: ‘Gblemoduade’ (an improved, highly branched variety) and ‘Ankra’ (a local variety with fewer branches) and three spatial arrangements. Cowpea rows were planted in the minor season into cassava as a successive crop to maize and soya bean after their harvest in the major season. Intercropping significantly reduced grain or tuber yield of maize, cassava ‘Gblemoduade’ and cassava ‘Ankra’ by 23–70%, 16–49% and 24–64%, respectively. Maize yield decreased with increased number of soya bean rows. ‘Gblemoduade’ outyielded ‘Ankra’ by more than 100% under both intercrop and sole crop. The yield of soya bean increased with increased number of soya bean rows, but did not differ in response to the cassava variety. However, cowpea yield was higher when intercropped with ‘Ankra’ than with ‘Gblemoduade’. The intercrops had higher land use ratios (LER=1·27–2·83) and were more stable than the sole crops. Intercrops involving ‘Ankra’ had higher LER (2·14–2·18) than systems with ‘Gblemoduade’ (LER=1·83–1·99), but their yield stabilities were similar.

Journal

Journal of Agricultural ScienceCambridge University Press

Published: Apr 17, 2003

There are no references for this article.