Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Book reviewMammals of China

Book reviewMammals of China CSIRO PUBLISHING Pacific Conservation Biology, 2022, 28, 197 Book review https://doi.org/10.1071/PCv27_BR9 Book review A single reference, ‘Zhigang et al. (2015)’ given in the intro- MAMMALS OF CHINA duction, was not included in the reference list: Zhang (1999) was By Jose´ Luis Copete (Compiler) included and this is possibly what the Compiler was pointing to 2020. Published by Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. 208 pp. in the introduction. Apparently, a better proofread was required. Paperback, 25.20h, ISBN 978-84-16728-28-2 [After correspondence with the author I have ascertained that two references were viewed, a book and a later paper. The book with maps was followed, which was Jiang et al. 2015.] However, This book is taken from the Handbook of the Mammals of the there is very little text to review: a single-page introduction, half World series (Wilson and Mittermeier 2009–2020), with minor a page of instructions on using the checklist (it is simple), and the modifications and updates. The compiler of this book, Mammals species’ accounts. The species’ entries carry essential data on of China, is Jose´ Luis Copete. Dr Copete is an editor with Lynx body length and mass, hair colour and general morphological or who has research interests in the phylogenetic relationships of geographical descriptions. Some of the species-maps show Oenanthe (Wheatears). The illustrators are all experienced wild- ranges not in China. For example, on page 24, the Korean Hare life artists led by Toni Llobet, the chief illustrator of the Illustrated Lepus coreanus is limited to North and South Korea. Its Checklist of the Mammals of the World (Burgin et al. 2020). inclusion suggests it crosses the border between North Korea This book presents an illustrated checklist of the mammals of and China, although it seems not to be drawn across this line in China. It is the third in a series of illustrated checklists. Its aim is the map. Of supplementary material there is a map of China and to furnish up-to-date information on the mammals occurring in surrounds following the introduction. I found its finer print too the region. Like other books in this series it is not intended to be a clustered and too fine to read easily. The bold print highlighting field guide, but to simply point to the animals in the region and to the surrounding countries was not as critical, but was easy to give diagnostic illustrations of them, although not all diagnostic read. The front and back covers have large flaps to help illustrations are possible with some species needing identifica- bookmark pages. tion by checking dentition or by DNA analysis. This book will have a limited educational role; beyond The framework for this checklist is the same as others in the checking general descriptions, broad morphometrics and very series. Its illustrations, maps and explanatory text are on the general distributions it has little value. Nonetheless, my family same pages – not facing pages. This design makes it easier to and I have used it for just those purposes: e.g., checking the navigate than those with the text and illustrations on facing distribution of ‘pink dolphins’ Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin pages. It has a contents, short introduction, a regional map, and Sousa chinensis. It had a more wide-spread distribution than we then the checklist – followed by one page of references and an expected. I would recommend this book to those who want a index. The book is dominated by the 182-page checklist, which general reference at home that is quick and easy to read. It may encompasses some 663 species, but does not include the intro- also be useful for libraries to help with school projects. duced or free-roaming domestic species. This book is intended for general readers or people simply wanting to complete a set of Graham R. Fulton checklists. English speaking Chinese may be interested. It may Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science, also serve as a quick reference guide for academics who have a University of Queensland and Environmental and simple question to answer. Conservation Sciences, Murdoch University. The strength of this book lies in its easy to follow layout and its high-quality illustrations. Its greatest weakness being that it References does not give detailed information on where to find each species Burgin, C. J., Wilson, D. E., Mittermeier, R. A., Rylands, A. B., Lacher, T. E., (it does have rough and simple maps) or provide the finer and Sechrest, W. (Eds). (2020). ‘Illustrated Checklist of the Mammals of descriptions of species to aid their identification. Yet it does the World.’ (Lynx Edicions: Barcelona.) remind readers that it is not intended to be a field-guide. Jiang, Z., Ma, Y., Wu, Y., Wang, Y., Zhou, K., Liu, S. and Feng, Z. (2015). I cannot see this book doing much to further the discipline of China’s Mammal Diversity and Geographic Distribution. (Science Press: Beijing.) mammology. Since much of the information presented is taken Wilson, D. E., and Mittermeier, R. A. (Eds) (2009–2020). ‘Handbook of the from the Handbooks of Mammals of the World (Vols 1–9), and Mammals of the World. Vols 1–9.’ (Lynx Edicions: Barcelona.) updated, one can assume its facts are reliable. A single page of Zhang, R. Z. (1999). China’s Zoological Geography. (Science Press: 28 references seems too little for the mammals of China. It Beijing.) appears that little direct research has gone into making this book. Journal compilation  CSIRO 2022 www.publish.csiro.au/journals/pcb http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pacific Conservation Biology CSIRO Publishing

Book reviewMammals of China

Pacific Conservation Biology , Volume 28 (2): 1 – Mar 9, 2021

Loading next page...
 
/lp/csiro-publishing/book-reviewmammals-of-china-nYKzRZZf6q

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
CSIRO Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s). Published by CSIRO Publishing
ISSN
1038-2097
eISSN
2204-4604
DOI
10.1071/PCv27_BR9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CSIRO PUBLISHING Pacific Conservation Biology, 2022, 28, 197 Book review https://doi.org/10.1071/PCv27_BR9 Book review A single reference, ‘Zhigang et al. (2015)’ given in the intro- MAMMALS OF CHINA duction, was not included in the reference list: Zhang (1999) was By Jose´ Luis Copete (Compiler) included and this is possibly what the Compiler was pointing to 2020. Published by Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. 208 pp. in the introduction. Apparently, a better proofread was required. Paperback, 25.20h, ISBN 978-84-16728-28-2 [After correspondence with the author I have ascertained that two references were viewed, a book and a later paper. The book with maps was followed, which was Jiang et al. 2015.] However, This book is taken from the Handbook of the Mammals of the there is very little text to review: a single-page introduction, half World series (Wilson and Mittermeier 2009–2020), with minor a page of instructions on using the checklist (it is simple), and the modifications and updates. The compiler of this book, Mammals species’ accounts. The species’ entries carry essential data on of China, is Jose´ Luis Copete. Dr Copete is an editor with Lynx body length and mass, hair colour and general morphological or who has research interests in the phylogenetic relationships of geographical descriptions. Some of the species-maps show Oenanthe (Wheatears). The illustrators are all experienced wild- ranges not in China. For example, on page 24, the Korean Hare life artists led by Toni Llobet, the chief illustrator of the Illustrated Lepus coreanus is limited to North and South Korea. Its Checklist of the Mammals of the World (Burgin et al. 2020). inclusion suggests it crosses the border between North Korea This book presents an illustrated checklist of the mammals of and China, although it seems not to be drawn across this line in China. It is the third in a series of illustrated checklists. Its aim is the map. Of supplementary material there is a map of China and to furnish up-to-date information on the mammals occurring in surrounds following the introduction. I found its finer print too the region. Like other books in this series it is not intended to be a clustered and too fine to read easily. The bold print highlighting field guide, but to simply point to the animals in the region and to the surrounding countries was not as critical, but was easy to give diagnostic illustrations of them, although not all diagnostic read. The front and back covers have large flaps to help illustrations are possible with some species needing identifica- bookmark pages. tion by checking dentition or by DNA analysis. This book will have a limited educational role; beyond The framework for this checklist is the same as others in the checking general descriptions, broad morphometrics and very series. Its illustrations, maps and explanatory text are on the general distributions it has little value. Nonetheless, my family same pages – not facing pages. This design makes it easier to and I have used it for just those purposes: e.g., checking the navigate than those with the text and illustrations on facing distribution of ‘pink dolphins’ Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin pages. It has a contents, short introduction, a regional map, and Sousa chinensis. It had a more wide-spread distribution than we then the checklist – followed by one page of references and an expected. I would recommend this book to those who want a index. The book is dominated by the 182-page checklist, which general reference at home that is quick and easy to read. It may encompasses some 663 species, but does not include the intro- also be useful for libraries to help with school projects. duced or free-roaming domestic species. This book is intended for general readers or people simply wanting to complete a set of Graham R. Fulton checklists. English speaking Chinese may be interested. It may Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science, also serve as a quick reference guide for academics who have a University of Queensland and Environmental and simple question to answer. Conservation Sciences, Murdoch University. The strength of this book lies in its easy to follow layout and its high-quality illustrations. Its greatest weakness being that it References does not give detailed information on where to find each species Burgin, C. J., Wilson, D. E., Mittermeier, R. A., Rylands, A. B., Lacher, T. E., (it does have rough and simple maps) or provide the finer and Sechrest, W. (Eds). (2020). ‘Illustrated Checklist of the Mammals of descriptions of species to aid their identification. Yet it does the World.’ (Lynx Edicions: Barcelona.) remind readers that it is not intended to be a field-guide. Jiang, Z., Ma, Y., Wu, Y., Wang, Y., Zhou, K., Liu, S. and Feng, Z. (2015). I cannot see this book doing much to further the discipline of China’s Mammal Diversity and Geographic Distribution. (Science Press: Beijing.) mammology. Since much of the information presented is taken Wilson, D. E., and Mittermeier, R. A. (Eds) (2009–2020). ‘Handbook of the from the Handbooks of Mammals of the World (Vols 1–9), and Mammals of the World. Vols 1–9.’ (Lynx Edicions: Barcelona.) updated, one can assume its facts are reliable. A single page of Zhang, R. Z. (1999). China’s Zoological Geography. (Science Press: 28 references seems too little for the mammals of China. It Beijing.) appears that little direct research has gone into making this book. Journal compilation  CSIRO 2022 www.publish.csiro.au/journals/pcb

Journal

Pacific Conservation BiologyCSIRO Publishing

Published: Mar 9, 2021

There are no references for this article.