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Book reviewScience Communication: An Introduction

Book reviewScience Communication: An Introduction CSIRO PUBLISHING Pacific Conservation Biology, 2022, 28, 198 Book review https://doi.org/10.1071/PCv27_BR10 Book review as a primer to the series. Yet, it is not exclusively targeted to SCIENCE COMMUNICATION: beginners, its inherent breadth will surely inform many already AN INTRODUCTION familiar within the field. The strength of this book lies in its targeting of learners and Edited by Frans van Dam, Liesbeth de Bakker, introducing an extremely broad discipline. I find this same Anne M. Dijkstra, and Eric A. Jensen strength to be its greatest weakness as the subject shifts from 2020. Published by World Scientific Publishing Co., Singapore. this to that and not linearly building a narrative. Stand-alone 251 pp. chapters do not entice me to take it to bed (unless I am interested Paperback, AUD $28.00 (Amazon), ISBN 978-981-120-987-1 in a particular chapter). Yet, this text must surely aid the discipline by providing a primer to explain how the many and varied sub-disciplines are engaging with science and its com- This book is the first volume in a proposed series dealing with munication, and how these all interact with the various cultures. the communication of and about science. The series’ authors and The area is vast so no doubt this volume, and the series, on editors were taken from an array of academic fields to write to an scientific communication, are needed as academic starting academic audience. The breadth of cultural and professional points in any attempt to amalgamate the varied spectrum into diversity in the volume’s creators is clearly evident. The chapter a coherent discipline. As a volume that aims to introduce a field authors are drawn from a variety of scientific disciplines, to academics, both familiar and unfamiliar with science com- cultural backgrounds and academic institutions, although they munication as a discipline, it is successful. are predominantly European. The editor-in-chief of the series The organisation of the text into chapters that are stand-alone Hans Peter Peters is German, the volume’s editors are from The papers was disappointing to me; I had wanted to read my way Netherlands and the UK, while the three writers of the book’s through in a narrative explained by a single author. However, foreword were drawn from institutions in Mexico, South Africa there are too many twists and turns when thinking about so many and China. scientific disciplines and cultures that a single narrative from a This volume, volume 1, is an introductory book. It centres on single author could never cover the same amount of ground. In key theoretical issues offering evidence-based cases and pre- direct contrast to the previous book I reviewed on scientific senting science communication as a social and cultural phenom- writing, which had a single narrative and no references, this enon with varied stakeholders, in addition to delving into the book with different subject chapters, all being fully referenced, public’s expectations of science and technology. Its aim is to left me feeling like I was getting a more rounded and less introduce the subject of science communication to academics authoritarian approach. I was benefitting from more authors and who are familiar with and those who are unfamiliar with the opinions even though each chapter represents only a single point discipline. on a long and varied spectrum. The book is comprised of two forewords: one by the series’ The writing style throughout is academic, which is to say the editor-in-chief and one by this volume’s editors. There are 10 writing is variable coming from different individuals, not stand-alone chapters, each submitted by different authors (single entertaining, but in a clear and concise academic style. There or multiple) on isolated subjects. All chapters are intended to is little in the way of supplementary material; the occasional introduce and discuss topics in relation to science communica- photograph and a few pictorial flowcharts reproduced on matt tion. Thus, the book is a collection of papers for academics. The paper are mostly uninspiring. The cover design is an artsy chapters are: Setting the Scene, Views of Science, The Process of representation of a molecular structure, I think. Communication Science, Science in Dialogue, Informal Science I do not often look for science communication on this broad a Education, Science Journalism, Risk Communication, Health scale. Nonetheless, I would recommend this book to students, Communication, Environmental Communication, and Research researchers and practitioners of science communication. It may in Science Communication; collectively a somewhat compre- also serve as an introduction for science policy makers and for hensive introduction. The 10 chapters average 26 pages in length those looking for deeper insights into the wide spectrum of the with all being fully referenced. There is a contents page, but no discipline. index, because each chapter stands alone. Each chapter is presented with an introduction and conclusion in an attempt at Graham R. Fulton uniformity through the volume. Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science, The volume’s focus on introducing the subject of scientific University of Queensland and Environmental and communication by giving a broad introductory background is Conservation Sciences, Murdoch University. appropriate for its academic audience, particularly as it is acting Journal compilation  CSIRO 2022 www.publish.csiro.au/journals/pcb http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pacific Conservation Biology CSIRO Publishing

Book reviewScience Communication: An Introduction

Pacific Conservation Biology , Volume 28 (2): 1 – Aug 17, 2021

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Publisher
CSIRO Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s). Published by CSIRO Publishing
ISSN
1038-2097
eISSN
2204-4604
DOI
10.1071/PCv27_BR10
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CSIRO PUBLISHING Pacific Conservation Biology, 2022, 28, 198 Book review https://doi.org/10.1071/PCv27_BR10 Book review as a primer to the series. Yet, it is not exclusively targeted to SCIENCE COMMUNICATION: beginners, its inherent breadth will surely inform many already AN INTRODUCTION familiar within the field. The strength of this book lies in its targeting of learners and Edited by Frans van Dam, Liesbeth de Bakker, introducing an extremely broad discipline. I find this same Anne M. Dijkstra, and Eric A. Jensen strength to be its greatest weakness as the subject shifts from 2020. Published by World Scientific Publishing Co., Singapore. this to that and not linearly building a narrative. Stand-alone 251 pp. chapters do not entice me to take it to bed (unless I am interested Paperback, AUD $28.00 (Amazon), ISBN 978-981-120-987-1 in a particular chapter). Yet, this text must surely aid the discipline by providing a primer to explain how the many and varied sub-disciplines are engaging with science and its com- This book is the first volume in a proposed series dealing with munication, and how these all interact with the various cultures. the communication of and about science. The series’ authors and The area is vast so no doubt this volume, and the series, on editors were taken from an array of academic fields to write to an scientific communication, are needed as academic starting academic audience. The breadth of cultural and professional points in any attempt to amalgamate the varied spectrum into diversity in the volume’s creators is clearly evident. The chapter a coherent discipline. As a volume that aims to introduce a field authors are drawn from a variety of scientific disciplines, to academics, both familiar and unfamiliar with science com- cultural backgrounds and academic institutions, although they munication as a discipline, it is successful. are predominantly European. The editor-in-chief of the series The organisation of the text into chapters that are stand-alone Hans Peter Peters is German, the volume’s editors are from The papers was disappointing to me; I had wanted to read my way Netherlands and the UK, while the three writers of the book’s through in a narrative explained by a single author. However, foreword were drawn from institutions in Mexico, South Africa there are too many twists and turns when thinking about so many and China. scientific disciplines and cultures that a single narrative from a This volume, volume 1, is an introductory book. It centres on single author could never cover the same amount of ground. In key theoretical issues offering evidence-based cases and pre- direct contrast to the previous book I reviewed on scientific senting science communication as a social and cultural phenom- writing, which had a single narrative and no references, this enon with varied stakeholders, in addition to delving into the book with different subject chapters, all being fully referenced, public’s expectations of science and technology. Its aim is to left me feeling like I was getting a more rounded and less introduce the subject of science communication to academics authoritarian approach. I was benefitting from more authors and who are familiar with and those who are unfamiliar with the opinions even though each chapter represents only a single point discipline. on a long and varied spectrum. The book is comprised of two forewords: one by the series’ The writing style throughout is academic, which is to say the editor-in-chief and one by this volume’s editors. There are 10 writing is variable coming from different individuals, not stand-alone chapters, each submitted by different authors (single entertaining, but in a clear and concise academic style. There or multiple) on isolated subjects. All chapters are intended to is little in the way of supplementary material; the occasional introduce and discuss topics in relation to science communica- photograph and a few pictorial flowcharts reproduced on matt tion. Thus, the book is a collection of papers for academics. The paper are mostly uninspiring. The cover design is an artsy chapters are: Setting the Scene, Views of Science, The Process of representation of a molecular structure, I think. Communication Science, Science in Dialogue, Informal Science I do not often look for science communication on this broad a Education, Science Journalism, Risk Communication, Health scale. Nonetheless, I would recommend this book to students, Communication, Environmental Communication, and Research researchers and practitioners of science communication. It may in Science Communication; collectively a somewhat compre- also serve as an introduction for science policy makers and for hensive introduction. The 10 chapters average 26 pages in length those looking for deeper insights into the wide spectrum of the with all being fully referenced. There is a contents page, but no discipline. index, because each chapter stands alone. Each chapter is presented with an introduction and conclusion in an attempt at Graham R. Fulton uniformity through the volume. Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science, The volume’s focus on introducing the subject of scientific University of Queensland and Environmental and communication by giving a broad introductory background is Conservation Sciences, Murdoch University. appropriate for its academic audience, particularly as it is acting Journal compilation  CSIRO 2022 www.publish.csiro.au/journals/pcb

Journal

Pacific Conservation BiologyCSIRO Publishing

Published: Aug 17, 2021

There are no references for this article.