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Children with isolated hypospadias have different hormonal profile compared to those with associated anomalies

Children with isolated hypospadias have different hormonal profile compared to those with... Abstract Aim: The objective of this study is to compare the hormonal profile of children with isolated hypospadias to controls and hypospadiacs with associated anomalies. Materials and methods: Study design: Prospective observation at a tertiary referral hospital. Study subjects: One hundred consecutive children (0–12 years) with isolated hypospadias (H), 23 with hypospadias and associated anomalies (HO). Controls: One hundred children (0–12 years) without any genitourinary/endocrine abnormalities (C). Procedure: Pre-human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and post-HCG fasting blood samples were drawn for estimation of serum gonadotropins, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), estrogen (E), progesterone (P), and testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Statistical analysis: Differences in hormonal levels between controls and subjects were computed with p≤0.05 as significant. Results: Compared with controls, “H” had significantly higher follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) (1.37 vs. 1.29 mIU/mL p=0.01), lower estrogen (8.08 vs. 13.78 pg/mL, p=0.00), and lower DHEA-S (27.34 vs. 40.24 μg/dL, p=0.03) levels; HO had higher FSH, lower basal T (0.13 vs. 0.46 ng/mL, p=0.01), and lower peak testosterone (1.53 vs. 2.32 ng/mL, p=0.01). “HO” had lower androgens (basal T, 0.13 vs. 0.29 ng/mL, p=0.03; peak T, 1.53 vs. 2.36 ng/mL, p=0.01), and higher estrogen (12.56 vs. 8.08 pg/mL, p=0.001) and progesterone (0.46 vs. 0.31 ng/mL, p=0.04) levels in comparison with H. Conclusion: Consistently lower output of androgens among HO explains the association of other anomalies (generally undescended testes) in them. High FSH among hypospadiacs hints at the possibility of Sertoli cell dysfunction and may have long-lasting sequelae for reproductive functions during adulthood. However, Leydig cell functions are affected more among HO. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism de Gruyter

Children with isolated hypospadias have different hormonal profile compared to those with associated anomalies

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References (38)

Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by the
ISSN
0334-018X
eISSN
2191-0251
DOI
10.1515/jpem.2011.421
pmid
22570959
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Aim: The objective of this study is to compare the hormonal profile of children with isolated hypospadias to controls and hypospadiacs with associated anomalies. Materials and methods: Study design: Prospective observation at a tertiary referral hospital. Study subjects: One hundred consecutive children (0–12 years) with isolated hypospadias (H), 23 with hypospadias and associated anomalies (HO). Controls: One hundred children (0–12 years) without any genitourinary/endocrine abnormalities (C). Procedure: Pre-human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and post-HCG fasting blood samples were drawn for estimation of serum gonadotropins, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), estrogen (E), progesterone (P), and testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Statistical analysis: Differences in hormonal levels between controls and subjects were computed with p≤0.05 as significant. Results: Compared with controls, “H” had significantly higher follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) (1.37 vs. 1.29 mIU/mL p=0.01), lower estrogen (8.08 vs. 13.78 pg/mL, p=0.00), and lower DHEA-S (27.34 vs. 40.24 μg/dL, p=0.03) levels; HO had higher FSH, lower basal T (0.13 vs. 0.46 ng/mL, p=0.01), and lower peak testosterone (1.53 vs. 2.32 ng/mL, p=0.01). “HO” had lower androgens (basal T, 0.13 vs. 0.29 ng/mL, p=0.03; peak T, 1.53 vs. 2.36 ng/mL, p=0.01), and higher estrogen (12.56 vs. 8.08 pg/mL, p=0.001) and progesterone (0.46 vs. 0.31 ng/mL, p=0.04) levels in comparison with H. Conclusion: Consistently lower output of androgens among HO explains the association of other anomalies (generally undescended testes) in them. High FSH among hypospadiacs hints at the possibility of Sertoli cell dysfunction and may have long-lasting sequelae for reproductive functions during adulthood. However, Leydig cell functions are affected more among HO.

Journal

Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolismde Gruyter

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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