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The Iron Oxides: Structure, Properties Reactions Occurrence and Uses

The Iron Oxides: Structure, Properties Reactions Occurrence and Uses without reference to crystal morphology, and lattice planes and zone axes do not appear until Chapter 4 (after the chapters on symmetry). The main potential value of the book for mineralogists would be to lead them to compare mineral structures with one another and with structures of other kinds, and to consider them from different points of view. New insights are most likely to be gained from the relatively minor cross references to a particular mineral, and it is therefore unfortunate that the index frequently fails to lead one to these. Perhaps the promised second volume will rectify this situation. Each chapter is followed by a series of excellent and challenging exercises, but it is a pity that answers are not generally provided. The benefit of exercises to the student is much reduced if he does not know whether his solutions are correct. Misprints and errors are commendably rare, and seem to be virtually confined to the section on layer silicates. The worst is that a description of the chlorite structure is said to be that of vermiculite. Bentonite and Fuller's earth are not the names of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mineralogical Magazine de Gruyter

The Iron Oxides: Structure, Properties Reactions Occurrence and Uses

Mineralogical Magazine , Volume 61 (5) – Oct 1, 1997

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by the
ISSN
0026-461X
eISSN
1471-8022
DOI
10.1180/minmag.1997.061.408.20
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

without reference to crystal morphology, and lattice planes and zone axes do not appear until Chapter 4 (after the chapters on symmetry). The main potential value of the book for mineralogists would be to lead them to compare mineral structures with one another and with structures of other kinds, and to consider them from different points of view. New insights are most likely to be gained from the relatively minor cross references to a particular mineral, and it is therefore unfortunate that the index frequently fails to lead one to these. Perhaps the promised second volume will rectify this situation. Each chapter is followed by a series of excellent and challenging exercises, but it is a pity that answers are not generally provided. The benefit of exercises to the student is much reduced if he does not know whether his solutions are correct. Misprints and errors are commendably rare, and seem to be virtually confined to the section on layer silicates. The worst is that a description of the chlorite structure is said to be that of vermiculite. Bentonite and Fuller's earth are not the names of

Journal

Mineralogical Magazinede Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 1997

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