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Civil Rights, Commerce, and US Colonialism

Civil Rights, Commerce, and US Colonialism This essay examines how the courts intensified Indigenous dispossession and legally disempowered African Americans through misinterpretations of the Commerce Clause and the Equal Protection Clause of the US Constitution. These misinterpretations support corporate interests, US sovereignty, and white supremacy while linking Congress’s plenary power over Indigenous nations to people of color’s civil rights. Hence, the civil rights of African Americans and other people of color are, in part, legally ineffectual promises contingent on expanding US sovereignty and racial capitalism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Civil Rights, Commerce, and US Colonialism

Social Text , Volume 36 (2 (135)) – Jun 1, 2018

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Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-4362361
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This essay examines how the courts intensified Indigenous dispossession and legally disempowered African Americans through misinterpretations of the Commerce Clause and the Equal Protection Clause of the US Constitution. These misinterpretations support corporate interests, US sovereignty, and white supremacy while linking Congress’s plenary power over Indigenous nations to people of color’s civil rights. Hence, the civil rights of African Americans and other people of color are, in part, legally ineffectual promises contingent on expanding US sovereignty and racial capitalism.

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References