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Managed Competition versus Industrial Purchasing of Health Care among the Fortune 500

Managed Competition versus Industrial Purchasing of Health Care among the Fortune 500 Managed Competition versus Industrial Purchasing of Health Care among the Fortune 500 -- Maxwell and Temin 27 (1): 5 -- Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law QUICK SEARCH: (advanced) Author: Keyword(s): Year: Vol: Page: Home | Help | Feedback | Subscriptions | Archive | Search | Table of Contents Institution: DEEPDYVE INC | Sign In via User Name/Password Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law 2002 27(1):5-30; DOI:10.1215/03616878-27-1-5 This Article Full Text (PDF) References Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Citation Map Services Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Alert me to new issues of the journal Download to citation manager Citing Articles Citing Articles via HighWire Citing Articles via Web of Science (15) Citing Articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Maxwell, J. Articles by Temin, P. Search for Related Content PubMed PubMed Citation Social Bookmarking What's this? Duke University Press Managed Competition versus Industrial Purchasing of Health Care among the Fortune 500 James Maxwell JSI Research and Training Institute Peter Temin Massachusetts Institute of Technology Abstract. The theory of managed competition has found favor with many health policy analysts and academic economists alike. Three characteristics—consumer choice, defined contribution, and dissemination of information—signal managed competition strategy. By requiring private employers to provide their employees with a choice of health carriers, a fixed-dollar strategy (defined contribution), and quality information to make appropriate choices among carriers, managed competition offers to remedy imperfections in both the consumer and provider sides of the market for health insurance. In an extensive survey of health care purchasing practices among Fortune 500 companies we found that major companies are not using the managed competition approach to health care purchasing. Instead, most of the companies surveyed are purchasing health care in the same way as they do other inputs to production—a pattern we call industrial purchasing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law Duke University Press

Managed Competition versus Industrial Purchasing of Health Care among the Fortune 500

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References (31)

Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Duke University Press
ISSN
0361-6878
eISSN
1527-1927
DOI
10.1215/03616878-27-1-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Managed Competition versus Industrial Purchasing of Health Care among the Fortune 500 -- Maxwell and Temin 27 (1): 5 -- Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law QUICK SEARCH: (advanced) Author: Keyword(s): Year: Vol: Page: Home | Help | Feedback | Subscriptions | Archive | Search | Table of Contents Institution: DEEPDYVE INC | Sign In via User Name/Password Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law 2002 27(1):5-30; DOI:10.1215/03616878-27-1-5 This Article Full Text (PDF) References Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Citation Map Services Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Alert me to new issues of the journal Download to citation manager Citing Articles Citing Articles via HighWire Citing Articles via Web of Science (15) Citing Articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Maxwell, J. Articles by Temin, P. Search for Related Content PubMed PubMed Citation Social Bookmarking What's this? Duke University Press Managed Competition versus Industrial Purchasing of Health Care among the Fortune 500 James Maxwell JSI Research and Training Institute Peter Temin Massachusetts Institute of Technology Abstract. The theory of managed competition has found favor with many health policy analysts and academic economists alike. Three characteristics—consumer choice, defined contribution, and dissemination of information—signal managed competition strategy. By requiring private employers to provide their employees with a choice of health carriers, a fixed-dollar strategy (defined contribution), and quality information to make appropriate choices among carriers, managed competition offers to remedy imperfections in both the consumer and provider sides of the market for health insurance. In an extensive survey of health care purchasing practices among Fortune 500 companies we found that major companies are not using the managed competition approach to health care purchasing. Instead, most of the companies surveyed are purchasing health care in the same way as they do other inputs to production—a pattern we call industrial purchasing.

Journal

Journal of Health Politics, Policy and LawDuke University Press

Published: Feb 1, 2002

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