Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

ENERGY, SPECIES RICHNESS, AND HUMAN POPULATION SIZE: CONSERVATION IMPLICATIONS AT A NATIONAL SCALE

ENERGY, SPECIES RICHNESS, AND HUMAN POPULATION SIZE: CONSERVATION IMPLICATIONS AT A NATIONAL SCALE The maintenance of biodiversity rests on understanding and resolving conflict between patterns of species occurrence and human activity. Recent debate has centered on the relationship between species richness and human population density. However, conclusions have been limited by the lack of investigations of these relationships for individual countries, at which level most practical conservation actions are determined, and for a spatial resolution at which practical conservation planning takes place. Here, we report the results of the first such analysis, for birds in South Africa. Species richness and human density are positively correlated, apparently because both respond positively to increasing levels of primary productivity. High species richness is maintained by currently designated reserves, but the areas surrounding these have higher human population densities than expected by chance, placing the reserves under increasing external pressure. Not all species lie within protected areas, but the options are limited for building on the present network to generate a more comprehensive one, which protects all species and significantly reduces the conflict with human activities by designating new reserves in areas with lower human populations. Ultimately, the only solution to the conflict between biodiversity and people is likely to be individual-based regulation of human population size. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Applications Ecological Society of America

ENERGY, SPECIES RICHNESS, AND HUMAN POPULATION SIZE: CONSERVATION IMPLICATIONS AT A NATIONAL SCALE

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ecological-society-of-america/energy-species-richness-and-human-population-size-conservation-7L0E2TXRX7

References (69)

Publisher
Ecological Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by the Ecological Society of America
Subject
Regular Article
ISSN
1051-0761
DOI
10.1890/02-5105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The maintenance of biodiversity rests on understanding and resolving conflict between patterns of species occurrence and human activity. Recent debate has centered on the relationship between species richness and human population density. However, conclusions have been limited by the lack of investigations of these relationships for individual countries, at which level most practical conservation actions are determined, and for a spatial resolution at which practical conservation planning takes place. Here, we report the results of the first such analysis, for birds in South Africa. Species richness and human density are positively correlated, apparently because both respond positively to increasing levels of primary productivity. High species richness is maintained by currently designated reserves, but the areas surrounding these have higher human population densities than expected by chance, placing the reserves under increasing external pressure. Not all species lie within protected areas, but the options are limited for building on the present network to generate a more comprehensive one, which protects all species and significantly reduces the conflict with human activities by designating new reserves in areas with lower human populations. Ultimately, the only solution to the conflict between biodiversity and people is likely to be individual-based regulation of human population size.

Journal

Ecological ApplicationsEcological Society of America

Published: Oct 1, 2003

Keywords: area selection ; avian species richness ; conservation conflicts ; human population size ; primary productivity ; reserves ; scale

There are no references for this article.