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Transforming Graduate Training in STEM Education

Transforming Graduate Training in STEM Education Sierra M. Love Stowell,1,5 M.A., Amber C. Churchill,1,4 M.S., Amanda K. Hund,1 Katharine C. Kelsey,2 M.A., Miranda D. Redmond,1 Sarah A. Seiter,3 Ph.D., Nichole N. Barger,1 Ph.D. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, UCB 334, Boulder, Colorado 80309 2 Environmental Studies Program, University of Colorado, UCB 397, Boulder, Colorado, 80309 3 CU Science Education Initiative, University of Colorado, UCB 334, Boulder, Colorado, 80309 4 Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, UCB 450, Boulder, Colorado, 80309 5 Author to whom correspondence should be addressed: lovestowell@gmail.com Introduction The need for improved instruction in college science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses is a prominent national policy issue (Brewer and Smith 2011, Olson and Riordan 2012). To address this need, instruction in many college STEM courses is being revolutionized through the adoption of student-centered evidence-based teaching practices. There is a growing body of literature on how to employ these techniques and on the benefits of using empirically validated teaching practices in college classrooms (Handelsman et al. 2004, Allen and Tanner 2005, Haak2011). The majority of efforts in STEM education transformation are directed at faculty, while graduate student training in these practices has not kept pace. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America Ecological Society of America

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References (21)

Publisher
Ecological Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the Ecological Society of America
Subject
CONTRIBUTIONS
ISSN
0012-9623
DOI
10.1890/0012-9623-96.2.317
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sierra M. Love Stowell,1,5 M.A., Amber C. Churchill,1,4 M.S., Amanda K. Hund,1 Katharine C. Kelsey,2 M.A., Miranda D. Redmond,1 Sarah A. Seiter,3 Ph.D., Nichole N. Barger,1 Ph.D. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, UCB 334, Boulder, Colorado 80309 2 Environmental Studies Program, University of Colorado, UCB 397, Boulder, Colorado, 80309 3 CU Science Education Initiative, University of Colorado, UCB 334, Boulder, Colorado, 80309 4 Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, UCB 450, Boulder, Colorado, 80309 5 Author to whom correspondence should be addressed: lovestowell@gmail.com Introduction The need for improved instruction in college science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses is a prominent national policy issue (Brewer and Smith 2011, Olson and Riordan 2012). To address this need, instruction in many college STEM courses is being revolutionized through the adoption of student-centered evidence-based teaching practices. There is a growing body of literature on how to employ these techniques and on the benefits of using empirically validated teaching practices in college classrooms (Handelsman et al. 2004, Allen and Tanner 2005, Haak2011). The majority of efforts in STEM education transformation are directed at faculty, while graduate student training in these practices has not kept pace.

Journal

Bulletin of the Ecological Society of AmericaEcological Society of America

Published: Apr 1, 2015

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