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THE IMPACT OF ISLAMOPHOBIA

THE IMPACT OF ISLAMOPHOBIA <jats:p> Muslims, as members of minority communities in the West, grow up against a background of everyday Islamophobia. I suggest that the Muslim self internalized in such a setting is denigrated ( Fanon 1952 ), a problem usually grappled with during adolescence when identity formation is the key developmental task. This typically involves the adolescent taking on polarized positions and embracing extreme causes. Following the 9/11 and 7/7 attacks Islamophobia intensified, which can be understood, at the psychological level, as an internal racist defence against overwhelming anxiety. Within that defensive organization, which I describe, fundamentalism is inscribed as the problematic heart of Islam, complicating the adolescent's attempt to come to terms with the inner legacy of everyday Islamophobia. I explore these themes through a case study of a young man who travelled to Afghanistan in the 1990s, and by brief reference to Ed Husain's The Islamist and Mohsin Hamid's novel The Reluctant Fundamentalist. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychoanalysis and History Edinburgh University Press

THE IMPACT OF ISLAMOPHOBIA

Psychoanalysis and History , Volume 11 (2): 175 – Jul 1, 2009

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References (7)

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2009
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1460-8235
eISSN
1755-201x
DOI
10.3366/E1460823509000397
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p> Muslims, as members of minority communities in the West, grow up against a background of everyday Islamophobia. I suggest that the Muslim self internalized in such a setting is denigrated ( Fanon 1952 ), a problem usually grappled with during adolescence when identity formation is the key developmental task. This typically involves the adolescent taking on polarized positions and embracing extreme causes. Following the 9/11 and 7/7 attacks Islamophobia intensified, which can be understood, at the psychological level, as an internal racist defence against overwhelming anxiety. Within that defensive organization, which I describe, fundamentalism is inscribed as the problematic heart of Islam, complicating the adolescent's attempt to come to terms with the inner legacy of everyday Islamophobia. I explore these themes through a case study of a young man who travelled to Afghanistan in the 1990s, and by brief reference to Ed Husain's The Islamist and Mohsin Hamid's novel The Reluctant Fundamentalist. </jats:p>

Journal

Psychoanalysis and HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jul 1, 2009

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