Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Distinguishing autism from co-existing conditions: a behavioural profiling investigation

Distinguishing autism from co-existing conditions: a behavioural profiling investigation Purpose– Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a lifelong neurodevelopmental condition for which there is no known cure. The rate of psychiatric comorbidity in autism is extremely high, which raises questions about the nature of the co-occurring symptoms. It is unclear whether these additional conditions are true comorbid conditions, or can simply be accounted for through the ASD diagnosis. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach– A number of questionnaires and a computer-based task were used in the current study. The authors asked the participants about symptoms of ASD, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and anxiety, as well as overall adaptive functioning. Findings– The results demonstrate that each condition, in its pure form, can be clearly differentiated from one another (and from neurotypical controls). Further analyses revealed that when ASD occurs together with anxiety, anxiety appears to be a separate condition. In contrast, there is no clear behavioural profile for when ASD and ADHD co-occur. Research limitations/implications– First, due to small sample sizes, some analyses performed were targeted to specific groups (i.e. comparing ADHD, ASD to comorbid ADHD+ASD). Larger sample sizes would have given the statistical power to perform a full scale comparative analysis of all experimental groups when split by their comorbid conditions. Second, males were over-represented in the ASD group and females were over-represented in the anxiety group, due to the uneven gender balance in the prevalence of these conditions. Lastly, the main profiling techniques used were questionnaires. Clinical interviews would have been preferable, as they give a more objective account of behavioural difficulties. Practical implications– The rate of psychiatric comorbidity in autism is extremely high, which raises questions about the nature of the co-occurring symptoms. It is unclear whether these additional conditions are true comorbid conditions, or can simply be accounted for through the ASD diagnosis. Social implications– This information will be important, not only to healthcare practitioners when administering a diagnosis, but also to therapists who need to apply evidence-based treatment to comorbid and stand-alone conditions. Originality/value– This study is the first to investigate the nature of co-existing conditions in ASD in a New Zealand population. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Autism Emerald Publishing

Distinguishing autism from co-existing conditions: a behavioural profiling investigation

Advances in Autism , Volume 2 (1): 14 – Jan 4, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/distinguishing-autism-from-co-existing-conditions-a-behavioural-blzEEfVsCP
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2056-3868
DOI
10.1108/AIA-09-2015-0018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose– Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a lifelong neurodevelopmental condition for which there is no known cure. The rate of psychiatric comorbidity in autism is extremely high, which raises questions about the nature of the co-occurring symptoms. It is unclear whether these additional conditions are true comorbid conditions, or can simply be accounted for through the ASD diagnosis. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach– A number of questionnaires and a computer-based task were used in the current study. The authors asked the participants about symptoms of ASD, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and anxiety, as well as overall adaptive functioning. Findings– The results demonstrate that each condition, in its pure form, can be clearly differentiated from one another (and from neurotypical controls). Further analyses revealed that when ASD occurs together with anxiety, anxiety appears to be a separate condition. In contrast, there is no clear behavioural profile for when ASD and ADHD co-occur. Research limitations/implications– First, due to small sample sizes, some analyses performed were targeted to specific groups (i.e. comparing ADHD, ASD to comorbid ADHD+ASD). Larger sample sizes would have given the statistical power to perform a full scale comparative analysis of all experimental groups when split by their comorbid conditions. Second, males were over-represented in the ASD group and females were over-represented in the anxiety group, due to the uneven gender balance in the prevalence of these conditions. Lastly, the main profiling techniques used were questionnaires. Clinical interviews would have been preferable, as they give a more objective account of behavioural difficulties. Practical implications– The rate of psychiatric comorbidity in autism is extremely high, which raises questions about the nature of the co-occurring symptoms. It is unclear whether these additional conditions are true comorbid conditions, or can simply be accounted for through the ASD diagnosis. Social implications– This information will be important, not only to healthcare practitioners when administering a diagnosis, but also to therapists who need to apply evidence-based treatment to comorbid and stand-alone conditions. Originality/value– This study is the first to investigate the nature of co-existing conditions in ASD in a New Zealand population.

Journal

Advances in AutismEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 4, 2016

There are no references for this article.