Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Annual Medical Spending Attributable To Obesity: Payer-And Service-Specific Estimates

Annual Medical Spending Attributable To Obesity: Payer-And Service-Specific Estimates In 1998 the medical costs of obesity were estimated to be as high as $78.5 billion, with roughly half financed by Medicare and Medicaid. This analysis presents updated estimates of the costs of obesity for the United States across payers (Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurers), in separate categories for inpatient, non-inpatient, and prescription drug spending. We found that the increased prevalence of obesity is responsible for almost $40 billion of increased medical spending through 2006, including $7 billion in Medicare prescription drug costs. We estimate that the medical costs of obesity could have risen to $147 billion per year by 2008. Amid calls for health reform, real cost savings are more likely to be achieved through reducing obesity and related risk factors. Footnotes Eric Finkelstein ( finkelse@rti.org ) is director of the Public Health Economics Program at RTI International in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Justin Trogdon is a research economist in that program. Joel Cohen is director of the Division of Social and Economic Research, Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, in Rockville, Maryland. William Dietz is director of the Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia. Eric Finkelstein and Justin Trogdon received external support for this work through a contract with the CDC Foundation. The authors thank Charles Feagan for his research assistance. Responses on This Article The Price Of Ignoring Obesity Tracy B. Bennett Health Aff published online August 21, 2009 Full Text The Obesity Problem Arvind R Cavale Health Aff published online July 28, 2009 Full Text http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Health Affairs Health Affairs

Annual Medical Spending Attributable To Obesity: Payer-And Service-Specific Estimates

Annual Medical Spending Attributable To Obesity: Payer-And Service-Specific Estimates

Health Affairs , Volume 28 (5): w822 – Sep 1, 2009

Abstract

In 1998 the medical costs of obesity were estimated to be as high as $78.5 billion, with roughly half financed by Medicare and Medicaid. This analysis presents updated estimates of the costs of obesity for the United States across payers (Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurers), in separate categories for inpatient, non-inpatient, and prescription drug spending. We found that the increased prevalence of obesity is responsible for almost $40 billion of increased medical spending through 2006, including $7 billion in Medicare prescription drug costs. We estimate that the medical costs of obesity could have risen to $147 billion per year by 2008. Amid calls for health reform, real cost savings are more likely to be achieved through reducing obesity and related risk factors. Footnotes Eric Finkelstein ( finkelse@rti.org ) is director of the Public Health Economics Program at RTI International in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Justin Trogdon is a research economist in that program. Joel Cohen is director of the Division of Social and Economic Research, Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, in Rockville, Maryland. William Dietz is director of the Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia. Eric Finkelstein and Justin Trogdon received external support for this work through a contract with the CDC Foundation. The authors thank Charles Feagan for his research assistance. Responses on This Article The Price Of Ignoring Obesity Tracy B. Bennett Health Aff published online August 21, 2009 Full Text The Obesity Problem Arvind R Cavale Health Aff published online July 28, 2009 Full Text

Loading next page...
 
/lp/health-affairs/annual-medical-spending-attributable-to-obesity-payer-and-service-p2RGxAR0Yp

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Health Affairs
Copyright
Copyright 2009 by Project HOPE: The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.
ISSN
0278-2715
eISSN
1544-5208
DOI
10.1377/hlthaff.28.5.w822
pmid
19635784
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 1998 the medical costs of obesity were estimated to be as high as $78.5 billion, with roughly half financed by Medicare and Medicaid. This analysis presents updated estimates of the costs of obesity for the United States across payers (Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurers), in separate categories for inpatient, non-inpatient, and prescription drug spending. We found that the increased prevalence of obesity is responsible for almost $40 billion of increased medical spending through 2006, including $7 billion in Medicare prescription drug costs. We estimate that the medical costs of obesity could have risen to $147 billion per year by 2008. Amid calls for health reform, real cost savings are more likely to be achieved through reducing obesity and related risk factors. Footnotes Eric Finkelstein ( finkelse@rti.org ) is director of the Public Health Economics Program at RTI International in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Justin Trogdon is a research economist in that program. Joel Cohen is director of the Division of Social and Economic Research, Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, in Rockville, Maryland. William Dietz is director of the Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia. Eric Finkelstein and Justin Trogdon received external support for this work through a contract with the CDC Foundation. The authors thank Charles Feagan for his research assistance. Responses on This Article The Price Of Ignoring Obesity Tracy B. Bennett Health Aff published online August 21, 2009 Full Text The Obesity Problem Arvind R Cavale Health Aff published online July 28, 2009 Full Text

Journal

Health AffairsHealth Affairs

Published: Sep 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.