Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

An International Comparative Study on Driving Regulations on People with Dementia

An International Comparative Study on Driving Regulations on People with Dementia Over 40% of people with dementia drive, with a two to five times greater accident risk than controls. This has fueled public concerns about the risk of traffic accidents by drivers with dementia (DWD). We compared driving regulations on seniors and DWD between ten European and Asia-Pacific countries to identify key implications for national strategies. Moderate to severe dementia was a reason for driver’s license revocation in all countries. However, regulations on mild dementia varied considerably, with most basing their decisions on severity, rather than simply the presence of dementia. Most used validated assessments, but responsibility for triggering the administrative process fell on drivers in some countries and on physicians in others. Administrations should consider the following when developing driving policies: 1) ideal regulations on DWD should ensure that restrictions are implemented only when needed; 2) fitness to drive should be assessed using validated instruments; 3) the use of processes that automatically initiate driving competency examinations following a diagnosis of dementia should be explored; and 4) restrictions should be delicately tailored to a range of driving competence levels, and assistive incentives compensating for lost driving privileges should be provided. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Alzheimer's Disease IOS Press

An International Comparative Study on Driving Regulations on People with Dementia

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ios-press/an-international-comparative-study-on-driving-regulations-on-people-uJsJ8gaM04

References (20)

Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved
ISSN
1387-2877
eISSN
1875-8908
DOI
10.3233/JAD-160762
pmid
28059784
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Over 40% of people with dementia drive, with a two to five times greater accident risk than controls. This has fueled public concerns about the risk of traffic accidents by drivers with dementia (DWD). We compared driving regulations on seniors and DWD between ten European and Asia-Pacific countries to identify key implications for national strategies. Moderate to severe dementia was a reason for driver’s license revocation in all countries. However, regulations on mild dementia varied considerably, with most basing their decisions on severity, rather than simply the presence of dementia. Most used validated assessments, but responsibility for triggering the administrative process fell on drivers in some countries and on physicians in others. Administrations should consider the following when developing driving policies: 1) ideal regulations on DWD should ensure that restrictions are implemented only when needed; 2) fitness to drive should be assessed using validated instruments; 3) the use of processes that automatically initiate driving competency examinations following a diagnosis of dementia should be explored; and 4) restrictions should be delicately tailored to a range of driving competence levels, and assistive incentives compensating for lost driving privileges should be provided.

Journal

Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseIOS Press

Published: Jan 1, 2017

There are no references for this article.