Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Advances in Electrochemical Energy Devices Constructed with Tungsten Oxide-Based Nanomaterials

Advances in Electrochemical Energy Devices Constructed with Tungsten Oxide-Based Nanomaterials Review  Advances in Electrochemical Energy Devices Constructed with  Tungsten Oxide‐Based Nanomaterials  1,2 2, 1, Wenfang Han  , Qian Shi  * and Renzong Hu  *    Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials, School of Materials Science  and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China;  wenfang.han@foxmail.com    The Key Lab of Guangdong for Modern Surface Engineering Technology, National Engineering Laboratory  for Modern Materials Surface Engineering Technology, Institute of New Materials,   Guangdong Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510651, China  *  Correspondence: qianzixlf@163.com (Q.S.); msrenzonghu@scut.edu.cn (R.H.)  Abstract:  Tungsten  oxide‐based  materials  have  drawn  huge  attention  for  their  versatile  uses  to  construct various energy storage devices. Particularly, their electrochromic devices and optically‐ changing devices are intensively studied in terms of energy‐saving. Furthermore, based on close  connections in the forms of device structure and working mechanisms between these two main  applications, bifunctional devices of tungsten oxide‐based materials with energy storage and optical  change  came  into  our  view,  and  when  solar  cells  are  integrated,  multifunctional  devices  are  accessible.  In  this  article,  we  have  reviewed  the  latest  developments  of  tungsten  oxide‐based  nanostructured materials in various kinds of applications, and our focus falls on their energy‐related  uses, especially supercapacitors, lithium ion batteries, electrochromic devices, and their bifunctional  and  multifunctional  devices.  Additionally,  other  applications  such  as  photochromic  devices,  sensors, and photocatalysts of tungsten oxide‐based materials have also been mentioned. We hope  Citation: Han, W.; Shi, Q.; Hu, R.  this article can shed light on the related applications of tungsten oxide‐based materials and inspire  Advances in Electrochemical Energy  new possibilities for further uses.  Devices Constructed with Tungsten  Oxide‐Based Nanomaterials.   Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692.  Keywords:  tungsten  oxides;  energy  storage  devices;  electrochromic  devices;  multifunctional  https://doi.org/10.3390/  devices  nano11030692  Academic Editor: Byoung‐Suhk Kim  1. Introduction  Received: 10 February 2021  Energy  exhaustion  and  environment  deterioration  has  caused  more  and  more  Accepted: 4 March 2021  scientific and public concern. To slow down the speed of resources running out and to  Published: 10 March 2021  ameliorate our living condition, turning to other inexhaustible energies including solar,  wind,  and  tidal  energy  and  employing  high‐efficiency  devices  to  save  energy  have  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays  neutral with regard to jurisdictional  naturally  become  very  important.  Under  the  uncontrollable  weather  conditions,  it  is  claims in published maps and  obviously challenging to get reliable and stable energy supply merely from inexhaustible  institutional affiliations.  energies. Therefore, those energy converting systems have to be used in conjunction with  high‐efficiency energy storage devices to store the converted energy [1,2]. As is known to  us, supercapacitors [3,4] and lithium ion batteries [5] are two types of widely used efficient  energy storage devices (ESDs). Moreover, electrochromic devices (ECDs) [6–8] are a well‐ Copyright: © 2021 by the authors.  known high‐efficient application through controlling sunlight intensity and the amount  Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.  of heat crossing it by changing transmittance.   This article is an open access article  Supercapacitors  (SC)  are  one  promising  energy  storage  device  for  its  unique  distributed under the terms and  advantages like high power density, ultra‐long cycling life (over 10  times), fast charging  conditions of the Creative Commons  speed (within tens of seconds), and outstanding performance under low temperature [9].  Attribution (CC BY) license  There are two main types of SCs, electrical double‐layer capacitors and pseudo‐capacitors  (http://creativecommons.org/licenses [3]. The former works basing on the centralization and decentralization of charge at the  /by/4.0/).  Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030692  www.mdpi.com/journal/nanomaterials  Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  2  of  42  interface between electrode and electrolyte, while the latter operates mainly relying on  Faradic  reactions  with  their  double  layer  capacitance  making  a  relatively  small  contribution to total capacitance [10]. Typically, the capacitance of pseudo‐capacitors is  higher  than  that  of  electrical  double‐layer  capacitors  [11].  Lithium  ion  battery  (LIB)  is  universally  applied  in  portable  electronic  products  and  electric  vehicles  for  their  high  energy density [12]. Now, the typical anode material in LIBs is graphite owing to its low  cost, stable electrochemical properties, and good structural stability. Its theoretical specific  −1 capacity, 372 mA h g , however, is relatively low as energy consuming needs continually  expand, thus limiting the further use of LIBs. Transitional oxide materials, such as tin  oxides  [13],  cobalt  oxides  [14],  and  tungsten  oxides  [15]  are  considered  potential  alternatives to replace graphite owing to their higher specific capacity.   Electrochromic  (EC)  materials  can  change  their  optical  parameters  including  reflectance, refractive index, transmission, and emissivity when applied with a relatively  low voltage (even smaller than 1 V) or an electric field [7], and this process is reversible  when the polarity of the voltage or the electric field reverses. Because they possess this  special property, ECDs are welcomed in smart windows, anti‐dizziness rearview mirrors,  display applications, and aerospace and military fields [16]. In particular, because energy  consumption in buildings accounts for 40% of the global energy consumption [17], when  they are  used as  smart  windows, a  large amount  of  energy  can be  saved  due to their  adjustable transmittance of sunlight. It has also been reported [18] that EC smart windows  were superior to photovoltaic devices on energy savings. Moreover, in view of the fact  that the color changing processes of ECDs also relate to ion insertion and extraction, an  ECD can be considered as a transparent ESD.  The  above  three  kinds  of  devices  share  similar  device  structure  and  operating  principle. Furthermore, many transitional metal oxides, like MoO3 [19–21], MnO2 [22–24],  and WO3 [15,25], can perform as the electrode material in these devices. Among them,  tungsten  oxides  have  large  energy  storage  capacity  that  enable  it  to  function  as  an  electrode  in  ESDs,  including  SCs  and  LIBs,  and  it  is  also  the  most  widely  researched  material in the EC field. When used as the electrode in SC, because the valence of W can  −1 be changed between +2 and +6, its theoretical specific capacity is 1112 F g  [26], much  higher than the normally used  double‐layer capacitor’s carbon electrode  material, and  −1 when as the anode in LIB, its theoretical specific capacity is 693 mA h g , nearly double  that of graphite. In addition, they are also endowed with other advantages including high  density, low cost, environmental friendliness, and nontoxicity. As in the EC field, the first  EC phenomenon was found in tungsten oxide by Deb in the sixties [27]. Tungsten oxides  are preferred for their short switching time, impressive color change, and electrochemical  stability.  Considering  that  ESDs  and  ECDs  have  several  correlations,  tungsten  oxide  electrochromic  energy  storage  devices  [28,29],  whether  it  be  electrochromic  supercapacitors  (ECSCs)  or  electrochromic  batteries  (ECBs),  have  also  attracted  much  attention. We can get direct information about their working condition from color signals,  bringing us great convenience and safety, or we can see it as a transparent battery and  make good use of the energy stored in it, reducing electricity consumption. Moreover,  these bifunctional devices can have more possibilities by integrating other parts, such as  solar cells, so that self‐powered systems are achieved [30,31]. Further, it can output power  generated by the solar cells to effectively use the energy. In view of the versatile uses of  tungsten  oxide‐based  materials  (Figure  1),  there  are  many  studies  on  them  and  some  researchers have reviewed their developments in one or two specific fields, like R. Buch  [32] in electrochromic, Dong [33] in photocatalysts, and V. Hariharan [34] in sensors. Yet,  reviews focused on their comprehensive applications are still very rare. In this review,  firstly (Section 2), we give a comprehensive introduction of the structures and uses of  tungsten  oxides,  especially  in  energy  storage  devices,  including  tungsten  oxide‐based  SCs, LIBs and ECs. Basic mechanisms and improving methods about tungsten oxides‐ based  SCs  and  LIBs  have  been  discussed  (Section  3),  following  with  the  material  and    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  3  of  42  nanostructure  design  of  tungsten  oxides  for  EC  applications  (Sections  4  and  5).  Particularly, when used as an electrode in ECDs, their performances in near infrared (NIR)  areas  have  been  introduced.  Furthermore,  considering  several  connections  like  device  structures,  working  principles,  and  materials  involved,  between  ESDs  and  ECDs,  tungsten  oxide‐based  bifunctional  devices  are  included  in  this  part.  Moreover,  we  mentioned the integration of solar cells in those bifunctional devices (Section 6). Finally,  we  provide  a  simple  introduction  to  other  applications  including  photochromism,  photocatalyst, and gas sensors of tungsten oxide‐based materials (Section 7), ending with  a perspective on new functions and novel applications for smart, flexible, and especially  self‐powering tungsten oxide‐based devices.  Figure 1. Applications of tungsten oxide‐based materials for electronic devices.  2. Energy Storage Mechanism of Tungsten Oxides  2.1. The Crystal Structure of Tungsten Oxides  In  light  of  the  fact  that  tungsten  trioxide  (WO3)  is  the  most  widely  used  of  the  tungsten oxides, we will mainly concentrate on WO3‐based materials. The perfect WO3 is  a kind of ReO3 type cubic structured material in which octahedral WO6 links each other  by  corner‐sharing  [25].  In  a  WO6  octahedron,  the  W  atom  lies  at  the  center  and  the  remaining  six  O  atoms  form  the  octahedral  framework.  As  temperature  and  pressure  change, the WO6 octahedron will tilt and rotate at certain angles, leading to the formation  of  several  different  phases:  tetragonal  phase,  orthorhombic  phase,  monoclinic  phase,  triclinic phase, and cubic phase [35–37]. Figure 2a shows the phase transformation of WO3  as temperature changes. Within WO3, there are sites and tunnels between octahedrons so  + + + that atoms with small diameters such as H , Li , and K  can transfer into WO3 and be  3, hexagonal phase, that can be obtained from  stored. There is also another phase of WO the hydrate‐losing process of hydrated tungsten oxides [38]. As shown in Figure 2b,c, in  the  a‐b  plane  of  this  phase,  there  are  trigonal  cavities  and  hexagonal  windows.  After  stacking  of  the  WO6  octahedron,  trigonal  and  hexagonal  tunnels  along  the  c  axel  are    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  4  of  42  formed [39,40]. These tunnels are conducive to the fast transfer of ions and electrons so  the electrochemical activity of hexagonal tungsten oxides is better than the WO3 of other  phases. The most common phases of tungsten trioxide are monoclinic phase (m‐WO3),  hexagon phase (h‐WO3), and cubic phase (c‐WO3).  Figure  2.  (a)  Tilt  patterns  and  stability  temperature  domains  of  the  different  polymorphs  of  WO3.  Reproduced  with  permission from [41]. Copyright IUCr Journals, 2000. The structures of hexagon phase h‐WO3 shown along (b) [001] plane  and (c) [100] plane. Reproduced with permission from [40]. Copyright American Chemical Society, 2009.  Oxygen  deficiencies  are  very  common  in  the  naturally  existing  WO3,  causing  the  existence of substoichiometric tungsten oxides, WO3‐x (0 < x <1), in which the valence of  W  might  be  +3,  +4,  or  +5  [42].  Among  them,  W18O49,  W20O58,  and  W24O68  are  the  most  common and the oxygen deficiencies within them can promote their conductivity. This  characteristic renders WO3 an n‐type semiconductor whose electric conductivity can be  adjusted by controlling the amount of O vacancy in it [43–45].  Tungsten  oxides  made  from  liquid‐related  methods  are  often  hydrated  tungsten  oxides before heat treatment, WO3∙xH2O, mainly including WO3∙0.33H2O, WO3∙0.5H2O,  WO3∙H2O, and WO3∙2H2O. The structure of WO3∙xH2O is largely decided by the value of  x. For example, the structure of WO3∙H2O is that H2O lies in the gap between the layers of  WO6 octahedrons [46,47], and the structure of WO3∙2H2O is that in addition to the same  kind of H2O molecule in WO3∙H2O, another type of H2O molecule directly links to the  tungsten atom at the bottom or top of the octahedron [48]. This structure is good for easy  transport  of  ions  and  electrons,  especially  protons  by  means  of  the  hydrogen  bond    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  5  of  42  network within them. Usually, hydrated tungsten oxides have much better conductivity  than pure tungsten oxide, translating into enhanced electrochemical performance [47].   2.2. Phase Transformation in Tungsten Oxides Toward Energy Storage  As we mentioned above, SCs and LIBs are two typical ESDs, and ECDs can be seen  as ESDs too. Here, we give a rough introduction and comparison between their working  mechanisms  and  requirements  of  tungsten  oxide  electrodes.  Figure  3  depicts  their  similarities and differences in terms of structures and mechanisms. SCs consist of five  main parts, two electrodes, electrolyte, and current collectors at both electrodes (Figure  3a) [4]. As for pseudo‐capacitors, they mainly rely on fast Faradic reactions on the interface  between electrode and the electrolyte. Take WO3 as an example. When used as electrode  material for pseudo‐capacitors, WO3 works according to Equation (1) [49–51]:   + − WO3 + xM  + xe  = MxWO3  (1) where M can be H, Li, Na, K, and other atoms or groups with small volumes. Different  from  tungsten  oxides  with  other  phases,  h‐WO3,  except  for  this  Faradic  reaction,  has  another way of energy‐storage by placing atoms in tunnels and cavities within its inner  structure [52].  Figure 3. Structures and mechanisms of tungsten oxides working in (a) supercapacitor (SC), (b) lithium ion battery (LIB),  and (c) electrochromic device (ECD). (d) Physical image of the color changing process of WO3.  LIB also shares the five‐layer sandwich structure (Figure 3b). It works depending on  Li   ions’  movement  between  cathode  and  anode.  Compared  with  that  of  pseudo‐ capacitors, the time needed for the charging and discharging process of LIBs is usually  much longer because the redox reactions happen not only at the surface of the electrode  but also in its deep bulk. Crystalline WO3 follows the conversion mechanism when as  anode material in LIB, as presented in Equations (2) and (3) [15]. From the equations, we  −1 also get the theoretical capacity of WO3, 695mA h g , when every W atom accommodates  6 Li . Nevertheless, it is a double‐edged sword because tungsten oxides suffer from large  volume change at the same time, causing structural collapses and fast capacity decreases  during cycling. Additionally, their low conductivity results in poor rate performance. As  shown in Figure 4, the morphology and phase changes in the WO3 made by magnetron  sputtering after initially fully discharged (at 0.01 V) and charged (at 4.0 V) have also been  explored  by  scanning  electron  microscopy  (SEM)  and  transition  electron  microscopy  (TEM), revealing a large volume change of phase variation [15].     Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  6  of  42  +  − WO3 (crystalline) + 6Li + 6e      W+3Li2O (initial discharging cycle)  (2) +  − W + 3Li2O      WO3(nanocrystalline) + 6Li + 6e   (3) Figure 4. (a) Initial discharge and charge curves of WO3 thin film anode. (b) SEM image of as‐deposited WO3 thin film; (c)  SEM and (d) selected‐area diffraction (SAED) images of WO3 thin film after initially discharged to 0.01 V; (e) SEM and (f)  SAED images of WO3 thin film after first charged to 4.0 V. Adapted with permission from [15]. Copyright Elsevier, 2010.  Usually,  as  shown  in  Figure  3c,  to  assemble  a  classic  ECD,  five  components  are  needed, namely electrochromic layer, ion storage (IS) layer, counter electrode (CE) layer,  and two transparent conducting (TC) layers. When the EC layer is WO3, the CE layer is  usually  anode  EC  materials  such  as  nickel  oxide  [53,54],  manganese  dioxide  [55],  vanadium  pentoxide  [56],  prussian  blue  [57,58],  and  some  organic  material  like  polyaniline (PANI) [59], etc., for they also present specific color change when the applied  voltage changes. Their colors can have a synergy effect to strengthen the color of the ECD,  or color superposition effect with the color of WO3 to enable the ECD to have multiple  colors. For instance, when nickel oxide works as the CE layer, it turns brown when WO3  is colored, hence the color of ECD is deepened. When PANI performs the CE layer, the  EC device can have four different colors (light green, green, light blue, and dark blue) as  voltage regulates [59]. Sometimes, pure indium tin oxide (ITO) film [54,60] or fluorine  doped tin oxide (FTO) film [61] can serve as CE layer as well, because they also have a  large capacity of ions, leaving the ECD composed of four functional layers. However, it  has been reported that an ECD with only single EC layer of tungsten oxide has relatively  poorer EC performances than those of a complementary one [62,63].  WO3 is a cathodic EC material. Its color change from colorless to blue appears as a  result  of  the  insertion  of  ions  and  electrons  when  a  negative  voltage  is  applied.  This  process  is  reversible  as  the  applied  voltage  turns  positive.  Thus,  we  can  see  ECDs  as  transparent ESDs. It has also been reported that these color changes happen owing to the  change  of band gap induced  by the insertion and extraction of ions [64,65]. Figure 3d  displays  the  optical  image  of  the  color  changing  process  of  WO3.  This  process  can  be  implied as following [66]:  + − WO3 (bleached state) + xM  + xe  = MxWO3 (colored state)  (4) + + + + where M  can be H , Li , K , et al.   As introduced above, it is found that the electrochemical reactions of WO3 in ECDs  are  similar  to  those  in  SCs  and  LIBs,  which  is  very  helpful  for  the  development  of    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  7  of  42  integrated devices from WO3‐based ESD and ECD. These three kinds of devices share the  same sandwich structure. However, their different working mechanisms call for different  requirements  for  tungsten  oxide‐based  electrodes.  Nevertheless,  for  all  three  kinds  of  devices, to get fast Faradic reactions, large specific surface area and good electrochemical  conductivity of the tungsten oxides electrode are necessary.  3. Energy Storage Devices Based on Tungsten Oxides  3.1. WO3 Electrode Materials of Supercapacitors  −1 WO3, with a theoretical capacitance of 1112 F g , is promising as an electrode material  for pseudo‐capacitors, but it also has drawbacks like unpleasant conductivity, poor rate  performance, and less‐satisfying cycling stability. The main improving methods can be  divided into two parts, getting nanostructured single‐phased tungsten oxide and getting  multi‐phased structures consisting of tungsten oxides with other materials such as carbon  material, transitional oxides, and organic materials. Table 1 lists tungsten oxides as anode  in SCs and their synthesizing methods and electrochemical performances, indicating that  most of the WO3 nanostructures for the SCs were prepared by hydrothermal processes.     Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  8  of  42  Table 1. Electrochemical performances of different tungsten oxides‐based electrodes in supercapacitors from literatures.  Electrochemical Performances    Products and Structures  Synthesis Method  Potential Window, Reference  Maximum Specific  Cycling Condition, Cycles,  Electrode, Electrolyte  Capacity  Capacity Retained  + −2 −2 −1 WO3 nanofibers [67]  Hydrothermal −0.65–0 V vs. Ag/AgCl, H   2 mA cm , 1.72 F cm   10 mV s , 6000 cycles, 79.1%  Hydrothermal +  −2 −2 WO3‐x nanorods [68]  annealing in  −10 V vs. SCE, 5 M LiCl  1 mA cm , 1.83 F cm   ‐‐‐‐, 10,000 cycles, 74.8%  hydrogen atmosphere  Alcohol‐thermal  −1.0–0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 0.5M  ‐‐‐, 10,000 cycles, almost no  −2 −2 WO3 nanosheets [69]  5 mA cm , 0.659 F cm   process  Na2SO4  decrease  −1 2.5 A g , 6000 cycles, 85.11%  −2 −2 −0.65–0.05V vs. Ag/AgCl, 0.5  3 mA cm , 2.58 F cm   WO3 nanotubes [70]  Hydrothermal  (decreased from 496.4 to 422.5  −1 −1 M H2SO4  1 A g , 615.7 F g   −1 F g )  −2 −2 −2 Furball‐like WO3  2 mA cm , 8.35 F cm   2 mA cm , 10,000 cycles,  Hydrothermal −0.3–0.4 V vs. SCE, 2 M H2SO4  −1 microspheres [50]  (=708.0 F g )  93.4%   Single phase  −2 −2  −1 WO3  −0.6–0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 2 M  10 A cm , 5.21 F cm 3 A g , 2000 cycles, nearly  WO3 nanorods array [71]  Hydrothermal  −1 −1 H2SO4  1 A g , 521 F g   100%   nanostructure −1 s  100 mV s , 2000 CV cycles,  −1 −1 h‐WO3 nanorods [72]  Hydrothermal −0.7–0.2V vs. SCE, 1 M H2SO4  5 mV s , 538 F g   85%  −1 −1 0.35 A g , 694 F g ;  −1 h‐WO3 nanorods [73]  Hydrothermal −0.5–0 V vs. SCE, 1 M H2SO4  50 mV s , 2000 cycles, 87%   −1 −1 0.93 A g , 484 F g   −0.4–0.6 V vs. SCE, 0.1 M  −1 −1 WO3 Nanowires [74]  Solvothermal  1 A g , 465 F g ‐‐‐‐, 2000 cycles, 97.7%  H2SO4  −1 −1 −1 W18O49 Nanowires [75]  Solvothermal −0.4–0.4 V vs. SCE, 1 M H2SO4  1 A g , 588.33 F g   1 A g , 5000 cycles, 88%   h‐WO3 nanoflake arrays  1.0–1.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1 M  −1 −1 Hydrothermal  0.5 A g , 538 F g ‐‐‐‐, 5000 cycles, 95.5%  [51]  Na2SO4  −1 −1 −1 WO3 nanospheres [76]  Hydrothermal  SCE, 2 M H2SO4  0.5 A g , 797.05 F g   5 A g , 2000 cycles, 100.47%    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  9  of  42  Frisbee‐like h‐ −0.6–0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1M  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal  0.5 A g , 391 F g   10 A g , 2000 cycles, 100%  WO3*0.28H2O [77]  2SO4  3% Pd‐doped WO3  −0.7–0.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1 M  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal  0.5 A g , 33.34 F g   1 A g , 1100 cycles, 86.95%  nanobricks [78]  Na2SO4  Cactus‐like WO3  0.0–0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1 M  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal  0.5 A g , 485 F g   1 A g , 5000 cycles, 93%   microspheres [79]  Na2SO4  Cactus‐like WO3  −1 −1 Hydrothermal −0.6–0.2 V vs. SCE, 2 M H2SO4  5 mV s , 970.26 F g   ‐‐‐‐, ‐‐‐‐, ‐‐‐‐  microspheres [80]  −1 −1 −0.3–0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 0.5 M  0.37 A g , 605.5 F g ;  −1 Pancake‐like h‐WO3 [52]  Hydrothermal  50 mV s , 4000 cycles, 110.2%  −1 −1 H2SO4  7.5 A g , 276.0 F g   Electrochemical  −3 −3 −3 WO3 nanochannels [81]  −0.8–0.5 V, 1 M Na2SO4  2 A cm , 397 F cm   10 A cm , 3500 cycles, 114%   anodization  Flower‐like hierarchical  −1 −1 1 A g , 244 F g ;  −1 WO 4 A g 3∙H2O/reduced  Hydrothermal −0.4–0.1 V vs. SCE, 1 M H2SO4  , 900 cycles, 97%   −1 −1 10 A g , 78 F g   graphene oxide (rGO) [82]  Feather duster‐like carbon  −1 −1 One‐step  −1–−0.3 V vs. Hg/HgSO4, 0.5 M  0.5 A g  496 F g ;  −1 nanotube (CNT)@WO3  100 mV s , 8000 cycles, 196.3%  −1 −1 solvothermal  H2SO4  10 A g , 407 F g   [83]  Multi‐walled carbon  −2 −1 2 mA cm , 429.6 F g   −1 nanotubes‐tungsten  Hydrothermal −0.6–0 V vs. SCE, 1 M LiClO4  100 mV s , 5000 cycles, 94.3%  −2 (1.55 F cm )  trioxide [49]  WO3‐carbon  composites  WO3‐rGO nanoflowers  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal −0.4–0.3 V, 0.5 M H2SO4  1 A g , 495 F g   1 A g , 1000 cycles, 87.5%  [84]  WO3 nanoparticles and  −0.3–0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 2 M  −1 −1 −1 nanowires in carbon  ‐‐‐‐  5 mV s , 609 F g   50 mV s , 1000 cycles, 98%   H2SO4  aerogel [85]  −1 WO3 nanoparticles in  Solvent immersion +  −0.3–0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 2 M  500 mV s , 3000 cycles, 96%  −1 −1 5 mV s , 1055 F g   −1 carbon aerogel [86]  calcination  H2SO4  50 mV s , 1000 cycling, 101%    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  10  of  42  −1 −1 Binder‐free and additive‐ −0.6–0.6 V vs. SCE, 1 M  5 mV s , 609 F g   −1 Hydrothermal  100 mV s , 2000 cycles, 89%   −2 −1 less WO3‐MnO2 [87]  Na2SO4  2 mA cm , 540 F g   WO3*H2O/MnO2  −0.1–0.9 V vs. SCE, 0.5 M  −1 −1 −1 Anodic deposition  0.5 A g , 363 F g   2 A g , 5000 cycles, 93.8%  nanosheets [88]  Na2SO4  WO3–V2O5  Microwave assisted  −1 WO3‐ KOH electrolyte  ‐‐‐‐, 173 F g   ‐‐‐‐, 5000 cycles, 126%   nanocomposites [89]  wet chemical route  transition  oxide  2D WO3/TiO2  Atomic layer  0.0–0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1 M  −1 −1 −1 1 A g , 625.53 F g   6 A g , 2000 cycles, 97.98%  composites  heterojunction [90]  deposition (ALD)  H2SO4  TiO2 nanoparticles‐ Two‐step atomic layer  −1 −1 0.0–0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1 M  1.5 A g , 342.5 F g   −1 functionalized 2D WO3  deposition process +  6 A g , 2000 cycles, 94.7%   −1 −1 H2SO4  30 A g , 285.3 F g   film [91]  post‐annealing  Template assisted  −1 −1 Porous WO3@CuO [92]  0.0–0.5 V vs. SCE, 6 M KOH  1 A g , 284 F g ‐‐‐‐, 1500 cycles, 85.2%  method  −1 −1 Electrochemical  −0.3–0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl, (in 3  1.4 A g , 615 F g   PEDOT/WO ‐‐‐‐, ‐‐‐‐,‐‐‐‐  3 [93]  −1 −1 deposition  M NaCl), 0.5 M H2SO4  10 A g , 308 F g   WO3‐organic  materials  In situ oxidative  5000 cycles, no significant  −1 −1 composites  2 A g , 586 F g ;  WO3@PPy [94]  polymerization  −0.8–0.0 V vs. SCE, 2 M KOH  changes in resistive property  −1 20 A g , 78% retained  process  and morphology    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  11  of  42  3.1.1. Single Phase WO3 Nanostructures   It is well known that nanostructured materials have larger specific surface area by  fining the size of materials, which makes them fully exposed to the electrolyte. The inner  active materials can be very accessible to ions and electrons so that redox reactions can be  accelerated. WO3‐based nanostructures, including quantum dots [95] (Figure 5a) and nano  particles,  nanofibers  [67],  nanorods  [68,  72,73],  nanotubes  [70],  nanochannels  [81]  and  nanowires  [74,75],  nanoflakes  [51],  nanoplates  and  nanosheets  [69]  (Figure  5c),  nanospheres  [76],  and  nanoflowers  have  all  been  researched.  Cong  et  al.  [95]  demonstrated that the WO3 quantum dots have better reversibility according to the more  symmetric charge‐discharge curve (Figure 5b) and more excellent rate performance. In  particular,  the  WO3  nanosheets  made  by  Yin  et  al. [69]  can  retain  a  capacity retention  almost  100%  after  10,000  cycles  (Figure  5d).  Huang  et  al.  [96]  got  WO3  samples  with  different morphology by hydrothermal method: nanorods, nanoplates, and microspheres  assembled of numerous nanorods. Among them, the ball cactus‐like WO3 microspheres  had larger specific surface area and more tunnels across these nanorods, translating into  lower equivalent series resistance (Rs) and excellent cycling stability, showing the best  capacitive performance.  Figure 5. (a) High‐resolution TEM image of as‐prepared monodispersed tungsten oxide spherical  quantum dots (QDs) with average sizes of 1.6 nm; (b) galvanostatic charge/discharge curves for  QDs and bulk materials under currents of 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 mA within potential from ‐0.5 to  0.2 V. Adapted with permission from [95]. Copyright John Wiley and Sons, 2014. High resolution  SEM image (c) and cycling stability (d) of WO3 nanosheets. Adapted with permission from [69].  Copyright Elsevier, 2018.  Apart from the aforementioned nanostructures, there are also other more complex  and interesting morphologies assembled by smaller nano‐units. For example, Shao et al.  [77] prepared frisbee‐like WO3∙nH2O microstructure assembled with numerous nanorods  (Figure 6a,b). Thanks to this special micro/nano structure, it had high specific capacity of  −1 −1 −1 −1 391 F g  at 0.5 A g  and good rate capacity of 298 F g  under 10 A g . After 2000 charge‐ discharge  cycles,  its  capacitance  retention  is  around  100%  (Figure  6c).  By  doping  Pd,  Gupta et al. [78] changed the morphology from nanosheets‐assembled cabbage pure WO3  into nanobricks‐assembled cauliflower Pd‐doped WO3, achieving larger surface area. He    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  12  of  42  et al. [50] fabricated a special furball‐like microsphere, of which the core was assembled  by a large number of nanorods and the shell was many other fluffy nanorods connecting  each core, resulting in a porous 3D structure network. Notably, when used as the electrode  in  SC,  even  after  10,000  charge‐discharge  cycles,  93.4%  of  its  initial  capacitance  was  maintained. In addition, WO3 3D nanorods array [71], cactus‐like microspheres hierarchy  3D structure assembled by numerous nanorods [79,80], mesoporous pancake‐like h‐WO3  [52], and WO3∙H2O flower‐like hierarchical architecture composed of nanosheets [82] have  also been reported, showing much enhanced performance in comparison to most WO3.  −1 Figure 6. (a) Schematic illustration of the formation, (b) FE‐SEM image, (c) charge‐discharge curves at 0.5 A g , and (c)  −1 cycling test at 10 A g  of the frisbee‐shaped crystalline h‐WO3∙0.28H2O. Adapted with permission from [77]. Copyright  Elsevier, 2018.   3.1.2. Multi‐Phased Tungsten Oxide Nanocomposites  Combining WO3 with other materials into composite is another direct way to achieve  better  performances  in  terms  of  good  conductivity,  high  capacitance,  and  excellent  stability. These composites obtained may possess the strengths of a single component and  it is much easier to get a special structure that will further optimize its performances.   Carbon materials have been frequently chosen for their attractive conductivity and  low cost. Additionally, they are also used as an electrode in double‐layer capacitors. The  combination of double‐layer capacitor material with pseudo‐capacity material can have  strengthened stability, capacitance, and rate performance. Di et al. [83] fabricated a feather  duster‐like  carbon  nanotube  (CNT)@WO3  composite,  in  which  WO3  nanosheet  grows  uniformly on the surface of CNT. After 8000 cycles of repeating cyclic voltammetry (CV)  −1 test at 100 mV s , this composite still retained 96.3% of its initial capacitance. Through a  two‐step  hydrothermal  method,  Shinde  et  al.  [49]  made  a  composite  in  which  multi‐ walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) uniformly grew on the carbon cloth substrate and  with WO3 nanorods growing on the MWCNTs. The prepared 3D structure had a large  surface area and good structural stability. Chu et al. [84] synthesized WO3 nanoflower,  well‐coated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets. The capacity of WO3 and  −1 −1 −1 WO3‐rGO composite were 127 F g  and 495 F g  respectively at current density of 1 A g ,  −1 and when the current density was 5 A g , capacity of the composite was as high as 401 F  −1 g .  These  improvements  were  down  to  the  shorter  ion  diffusion  paths  and  3D  nanostructure  of  the  composite.  Liu  et  al.  [85]  embedded  WO3  hybrid  nanowires  and  −1 nanoparticles in carbon aerogel and the electrode also showed a high capacity of 609 F g .    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  13  of  42  Later, they used the same method dispersing size‐selected WO3 nanoparticles in carbon  aerogel and the results were also very pleasing [86].   Transition  oxide  materials  such  as  V2O5,  MnO2,  CuO,  and  TiO2  are  other  typical  electrode materials for pseudo‐capacitors owing to their high capacitance and stability,  and  they  are  often  used  to  form  a  composite  with  WO3.  Shinde  et  al.  [87]  got  a  −1 nanostructured composite of WO3 and MnO2, which had high capacity of 540 F g  at 2  −2 mA cm  and good stability with 89% retention of initial capacitance after 2000 CV tests.  Yuan’s group [88] also prepared nano‐WO3*H2O/MnO2 composite with high capacity of  −1 −1 363 F g  at 0.5 A g . Periasamy et al. [89] reported a rod‐shaped WO3‐V2O5 composite  prepared  by  microwave‐assisted  wet‐chemical  method.  When  in  KOH  electrolyte,  its  capacity was higher than pure WO3 by some distance. Moreover, it was noteworthy that  after 5000 long cycles, the composite showed excellent capacity retention of 126% and had  Coulombic efficiency of 100% up to 5000 cycles. In addition, WO3/TiO2 composites [90,91]  and WO3@CuO composites [92] have been researched.   As  well  as  carbon  materials  and  transition  oxide  materials,  organic  materials,  especially  conductive  polymers,  such  as  PANI,  poly‐3,4‐ethylenedioxithiophene  (PEDOT), and poly‐pyrrole (PPy), are also preferred to combine with WO3 for their high  conductivity, low cost, and easy fabrication. Zhuzhelskii’s group [93] dispersed WO3 in  PEDOT. The porous PEDOT matrix ensured fast ion and electron transfer, thus promoting  the  electrochemical  performance.  Similarly,  Das  et  al.  [94]  fabricated  a  WO3@PPy  composite, in which WO3 nanostick is the core and PPy capsulated WO3. Owing to the  high  conductivity  of  PPy  and the  specific  structure,  shorter  diffusion  path  length  and  greater stability were realized.  3.2. Tungsten Oxide‐Based Materials as Anodes in Lithium Ion Battery  As mentioned before, when used as anode material in LIB, tungsten oxides suffer  from structural collapses and fast capacity decreases during the charge‐discharge cycling  owing to the large volume change. Additionally, their low conductivity results in poor  rate performance. So far, as listed in Table 2, some effective methods have been offered to  improve  the  electrochemical  performances  of  tungsten  oxides.  When  O  vacancies  are  introduced into tungsten oxides, its conductivity may be largely improved, and changing  vacancy concentration to get increased conductivity has been tried. Nanostructures are  not  only adopted  in SCs but  also in  LIBs.  Moreover,  adding  carbon  materials  such  as  graphite, reduced graphite, and carbon nanotubes into tungsten oxide to get complex is  also often adopted due to their high conductivity and structural stability.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  14  of  42  Table 2. Electrochemical performances of different tungsten oxide‐based electrodes in lithium battery from the literature.  Electrochemical Performances  Synthesis  Initial    Products and Structures  Voltage Window, Current Density,  Current Density/(mA/g), Cycles,  Method  Efficienc Capacity (Initial/Second)  Capacity Retained  y  −1 m‐WO3‐x [97]  Template method  53%  0–2.5V, ‐‐‐,748 mA h g  (1st)  ‐‐‐,‐‐‐, ‐‐‐  Non‐ 100 mA/g, 150 cycles, 954 mA h  stochiometric  Thermal  −1 −1 0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 1760 mA h g   N‐WOx [98]  52.2%  −1 g   tungsten  annealing  −1 (1st); 817 mA h g  (2nd)  −1 −1 10 A g , 4000 cycles, 228 mA h g   oxides  −1 −1 Nanogranular WO3 with excess  Magnetron  0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 778.8 mA h g   −1 ‐‐‐  1 A g , 500 cycles, 217% retained  oxygen [99]  sputtering  (1st)  −1 −1 0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 1121.4 mA h g   −1 100 mA g , 200 cycles, 900 mA h  WO3 Nanotubes [70]  Hydrothermal  77.8%  (1st)  −1 g   −1 −1 WO3 nanowires [100]  Hydrothermal  55.3%  0–3.0V, 0.1C, 954 mA h g  (1st)  0.1 C, 100 cycles, 552 mA h g   Nanostructure d tungsten  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal +  0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 2086.4 mA h g   100 mA g , 100 cycles, 720.5 mA  oxides  Flower‐like h‐WO3 [101]  ‐‐‐  −1 calcination  (1st)  h g   Soft template  −1 −1 WO3 hollow nanospheres [102]  74.0%  0–3.0V, 0.2 C, 1054 mA h g  (1st)  0.2 C, 100 cycles, 294 mA h g   assisted method  Carbon‐ Hydrothermal +  3D sandwich‐type architecture  −1 tungsten  ultrasonic  1800 mA g , 500 cycles, 397 mA h  −1 −1 with 2D WO3 nanoplatelets and 2D  71.8%  0–3.0V, 72 mA g , 1262 mA h g  (1st)  −1 oxides  stirring + thermal  g GS [103]  composites  treatment    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  15  of  42  WO3 nanoplates and graphene  −1 Hydrothermal +  400 mA g , 50 cycles, 455 mA h  nanosheets 2D nanocomposites  ‐‐‐  ‐‐‐, ‐‐‐, ‐‐‐  −1 heating process  g  (64.3% retained)  [104]  Bamboo‐like WO3 nanorods  −1 Hydrothermal +  80 mA/g, 100 cycles, 828 mA h g   −1 anchored on 3D nitrogen‐doped  64.5%  0–3.0V, 1280 mA h g  (1st)  heating process  (73.8% retained)  graphene frameworks [105]  −1 −1 −1 WO3 nanosheet@rGO square  0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 1143 mA h g   100 mA g , 150 cycles, 1005.7 mA  Hydrothermal  87.9%  particles [106]  (1st)  h/g  h‐WO3 nanorods embedded into  Ultrasonic  −1 −1 −1 0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 1030 mA h g   1500 mA g , 200 cycles, 196 mA h  nitrogen, sulfur co‐doped rGO  processing +  ‐‐‐  −1 −1 (1st), 816.3 mA h g  (2nd)  g   nanosheets (54 wt %) [107]  hydrothermal  WO3 particles deposited on 3D  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal +  0–3.0V, 50 mA g , 1120 mA h g  (1st), 150 mA g , 100 cycles, 487 mA h  macroporous rGO frameworks  57.23%  −1 −1 freeze‐drying  719 mA h g  (2nd)  g  (~99% retained)  [108]  Evaporation  −1 −1 Ordered mesoporous carbon/WO3  0–3.0V, 100 A g , 1275 mA h g  (1st),  100 mA/g, 100 cycles, 440 mA h  induced self‐ 56.2%  −1 −1 [109]  712 mA h g  (2nd)  g   assembly  −1 −1 −1 Cauliflower‐like WO3 decorated  Hydrothermal +  0–3.0V, 50 mA g , 750 mA h g  (1st)  50 mA/g, 50 cycles, 650 mA h g   67%  −1 with carbon [110]  firing  and 500 mA h g  (2nd)  (~Li5.5WO3)    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  16  of  42  −1 Template  0–3.0V, C/20, 10,791 mA h g  (1st),  −1 Carbon‐coated 3D WO3 [111]  60.1%  ‐‐‐, 500 cycles, 253 mA h g   −1 assisted process  649mA h g  (2nd)  −1 −1 −1 WO3*0.33H2O@C nanoparticles  Low temperature  0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 1543 mA h g   100 mA g , 200 cycles, 816 mA h  46.1%  −1 [112]  combustion   (1st)  g   −1 −1 −1 Acid‐assisted  0–3.0V, 200 mA g , 1866 mA h g   200 mA g , 100 cycles, 662 mA h  Ultrathin WO3−x/C nanosheets [113]  39.4%  −1 −1 one‐pot process  (1st), 893 mA h g  (2nd)  g     Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  17  of  42  3.2.1. Non‐Stoichiometric Tungsten Oxides  As introduced above, substoichiometric tungsten oxides are common in the natural  world. O vacancies within them have a positive effect on the transport of electrons. In  addition, WO3 is an n‐type semiconductor, whose conductivity mainly depends on the  concentration  of  free  electrons  in  their  conduction  bands  or,  in  other  words,  the  concentration of donor within it [114]. By adjusting the ratio of W and O within tungsten  oxides, the concentration of vacancies is changed accordingly, and its conductivity can  drastically increase  [115].  Thus,  substoichiometric  tungsten  oxides  such  as  W18O49  and  W20O58  and  tungsten  oxides  with  naturally  existing  O  vacancies  are  preferred.  For  example, Yoon et al. [97] prepared a mesoporous m‐WO3‐x electrode. Though its initial  −1 Coulombic efficiency is only 53%, its reversible capacity reached 748 mA h g . Moreover,  −1 its electrical conductivity of 1.76 S cm  is also very competitive to mesoporous carbon  −1 materials (3.0 S cm ). Li et al. [116] increased the density of O vacancy in tungsten oxide  by annealing WO3 in N2 environment. The introduced O vacancy remarkably enhanced  the  conductivity  of  tungsten  oxide,  giving  rise  to  excellent  rate  performance  and  reversibility of the electrode.   Appropriate  O  vacancies  concentration  can  translate  into  improved  conductivity  while excess O vacancies may be self‐defeating. Sometimes we can also fill the O vacancy  with other atoms that have similar diameter to O atom. Cui et al. [98] refilled O vacancies  with N atom in WOx (Figure 7a), transforming it into ultrafine disordered clusters (Figure  7b). The introduction of N offered many redox sites and facilitated the electrochemical  kinetics, thus getting superior high‐rate performance (Figure 7c). Aside from introducing  O  vacancies  into  tungsten  oxides,  excess  O  in  tungsten  oxides  is  also  helpful  because  excess O can result in distortion of tunnels within tungsten oxides. Inamdar et al. [99]  obtained tungsten oxide with excess O by adjusting the ratio of Ar to O2 in radiofrequency  (RF) magnetron sputtering process. Results showed that the charge transfer resistance of  WOx under the gas ratio of 7:3 was tested to be 215 Ω, much lower compared with 370.8  Ω  when  the gas is  pure  Ar.  They attributed this  to the  increased  donor  concentration  induced by excess O in tungsten oxide. It is worth noting that the performance of tungsten  oxide with excess O under high current density was also impressive.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  18  of  42  Figure 7. (a) Schematic illustration of the synthesis process for WOx and N‐WOx; (b) high‐magnification high angle annular  dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF‐STEM) image of N‐WOx; (c) rate performance of WOx, N‐ −1 −1 WOx, and WO3 between 0.1 A g  to 10 A g . Adapted with permission from [98]. Copyright John Wiley and Sons, 2019.  3.2.2. Nano‐Structured Tungsten Oxides  Through  the  sol‐gel  method,  hydrothermal  method,  and  template  method,  nano‐ structured tungsten oxides can be easily obtained. Wu et al. [70] made WO3 nanotube  bundles  by  one‐step  hydrothermal  and  post‐annealing  process.  Its  initial  specific  −1 discharge  capacity  and  initial  Coulombic  efficiency  were  871.9  mA  h  g   and  77.8%,  respectively. Lim et al. [100] prepared WO3 nanocrystals and nanowires. Both samples  −1 showed high initial capacity of 867 and 954 mA h g  at 0.1C. For instance, after 100 cycles,  −1 the specific discharge capacity of WO3 nanowires retained 552 mA h g , and its average  Coulombic  efficiency  was  97.2%  during  2–100  cycles.  Yang  et  al.  [101]  synthesized  hierarchical  flower‐like  WO3  using  HCOOH  as  structure‐directing  agent  in  the  hydrothermal method (Figure 8a). Every flower petal consisted of numerous nanorods  −1 −1 (Figure 8b). At a current density of 100 mA g , its reversible capacity was 766 mA h g   −1 after 50 cycles and still remained at 720 mA h g  even after 100 cycles. Additionally, under  −1 −1 current density of 500 mA h g , its capacity was as high as 576.8 mA h g . All the results  demonstrated good cycling and rate performance for the hierarchical flower‐like WO3.  Sasidharan  et  al.  [102]  used  poly(styrene‐b‐[3‐(methacryloylamino)  propyl]  trimethylammonium  chloride‐b‐ethylene  oxide)  micelles  (PS‐PMAPTAC‐PEO)  as  the  template  to  produce  WO3  hollow  nanospheres.  The  whole  triblock  copolymer  is  composed of PS as its core, PMAPTAC as its shell and PEO as its corona. PMAPTAC can  2+ effectively  bind  with  WO4   cations.  After  the  following  calcinations,  the  polymeric  template is completely removed and the WO3 hollow nanosphere can be produced.     Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  19  of  42  Figure  8.  (a)  Schematic  illustration  of  the  formation  of  hierarchical  flower‐like  WO3∙0.33H2O;  (b)  SEM  image  of  WO3∙0.33H2O. Adapted with permission from [101]. Copyright Society of Chemistry, 2011. (c) Schematic illustration of the  formation of 3D hierarchical sandwich‐type tungsten trioxide nanoplatelets and graphene (TTNPs‐GS); (d) SEM overall  −1 appearance of single TTNPs‐GS; (e) long cycling stability at 1080 mA g  for 1000 cycles of TTNPs‐GS. Adapted with  permission from [103]. Copyright Elsevier, 2016.   3.2.3. Tungsten Oxide‐Carbon Composites  Introducing carbon materials into tungsten oxide to get composite can have several  advantages. One is that the composite can integrate the advantages of both tungsten oxide  and carbon material. The other is that it is more possible to form facile structures with  high structure stability. Graphene is a flat monolayer based on single carbon atoms layer  in a honeycomb lattice. This specific 2D structure gives it a super high theoretical specific  2 −1 surface area (2675 m  g ) [117] and offers high thermal and electronic conductivity. Zeng  et al. [106] synthesized hierarchical sandwich composite consisting of WO3 nanoplatelets  and graphene (Figure 8c). They added WO3*H2O nanoplatelets into the well‐dispersed  graphene oxide solution and then stirred the solution to form homogeneous suspension.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  20  of  42  Following that was the vacuum filtration process. After WO3*H2O nanoplatelets‐GO was  peeled  from  the  membrane,  it  then  underwent  heat  treatment  and  finally  the  WO3  nanoplatelets and graphene were obtained (Figure 8d). WO3 was embedded uniformly in  the interlayer of graphene so that the electrode had stable cycling performance since the  volume expansion of WO3 can be effectively relieved during cycling. At current density  −1 −1 of 1080 mA g , its reversible capacity was kept at around 615 mA h g  after 1000 cycles  (Figure  8e).  Kim  et  al.  [104]  reported  a  2D  nanocomposite  consisting  of  graphene  −1 nanosheets with WO3 nanoplates well scattered on it. After 50 cycles at 80 mA g , its  −1 −1 capacity was 688.8 mA h g  compared with 555.2 mA h g  of pure WO3. Gu et al. [105]  produced  bamboo‐like  WO3  nanorods  anchored  on  the  N‐doped  3D  graphene  frameworks.  This  composite  can  effectively  bear  the  volume  change  and  it  provided  higher conductivity for superior high‐rate capability   Reduced graphene oxide (rGO), usually obtained by reducing graphene oxide [118],  is widely used to achieve better electrochemical performances of tungsten oxides. Dang  et al. [106] successfully embedded WO3 nanoplates in a rGO matrix with a hydrothermal  −1 method followed by a heating treatment. Surprisingly, after 150 cycles under 100 mA g ,  −1 −1 its discharge capacity remained at 1005.7 mA h g , nearly twice that (565 mA h g ) of  pure WO3. The main reasons for this improvement can be ascribed to the fact that rGO  can not only offer easier access for ions and electrons but also largely buffer the damage  to its structure during cycling. Huang et al. [107] produced h‐WO3 nanorods embedded in  −1 the rGO matrix doped with N and S. At a current density of 100 mA g , the composite  −1 possessed a specific discharge capacity of 1030.3 mA h g  at the first cycle and was down  −1 slightly to 816 mA h g  in the second cycle. Moreover, at a high current density of 1500  −1 −1 mA g , its specific discharge capacity was averaged at 196.1 mA h g  over 200 cycles.  Park  et  al.  [108]  dispersed  WO3  particles  on  3D  macroporous  rGO  frameworks.  This  special structure and rGO’s good conductivity jointly improved its rate capability and  cycling stability.  Mesoporous carbon material is another kind of carbon material with high electrical  and thermal conductivity, highly porous structure, and large specific surface area [119].  Wang et al. [109] dispersed ultrasmall WO3 nanocrystals into mesoporous carbon matrix.  During the preparing process, the W species were limited by the carbon matrix, making  2 −1 the particle size of WO3 around 3 nm and high surface area of 157 m  g  for the composite.  −1 After 100 cycles at current density of 100 mA g , its specific discharge capacity was 440  −1 mA h g . Kim et al. [120] also achieved a nanocomposite in which WOx nanoparticles were  uniformly embedded in the mesoporous carbon matrix. Its main improvement was the  lower  polarization  during  the  delithiation  process  owing  to  the  high  conductivity  of  mesoporous carbon matrix and shorter lithium on diffusion pathway.  Aside from the above‐mentioned carbon materials, amorphous carbon materials are  also often used to achieve better electrochemical performance. For example, Yoon et al.  [110]  coated  cauliflower‐like  WO3  with  a  thin  layer  of  carbon  (Figure  9a–c),  which  strengthened the electrochemical correlation between active WO3 and current collector  and buffered the volume change as well. It showed much better cycling stability and rate  performance than the pure WO3 (Figure 9d). Herdt et al. [111] made WO3 nanorod arrays  encapsulated in a thin layer of carbon. After 200 cycles of charge‐discharge at C/20, the  vertical arrangement of nanorods were maintained, indicating the outstanding structural  stability  of  this  composite.  In  addition,  Liu  et  al.  [112]  obtained  a  WO3*0.33H2O@C  composite in which amorphous carbon was coated around WO3*0.33H2O. Interestingly,  in his study, an appropriate amount of carbon coating can have positive effects while it  can be self‐defeating when the amount of carbon is in excess because it decreased the  crystallinity  of  WO3∙0.33H2O  and  sacrificed  the  capacity  of  the  composite  as  well.  Furthermore,  Bao  et  al.  [113]  reported  that  the  ultrathin  WO3‐x  nanoplate  doped  with  carbon also showed excellent electrochemical performance.     Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  21  of  42  Figure 9. (a) Schematic illustration of the synthetic procedure, (b,c) SEM images for cauliflower‐like carbon‐coated WO3;  (d) comparison of cycling performances of cauliflower‐like WO3 and cauliflower‐like carbon‐coated WO3. Adapted with  permission from [110]. Copyright Elsevier, 2014.  4. Electrochromic Applications  4.1. Tungsten Oxides as EC Electrode in Visible Light Area  Previous works about WO3 mostly concentrated on improving its EC performances  in  visible  light  spectrum  area,  with  EC  performances  in  the  near  infrared  (NIR)  and  infrared (IR) spectrum area neglected. Their objects focused on getting WO3 EC films with  wider  optical  modulation  amplitudes,  shorter  response  times,  and  higher  coloration  efficiency  in  the  visible  light  area.  To  achieve  these,  efforts  involving  getting  nanostructured tungsten oxides, porous structured tungsten oxides, and doped tungsten  oxides were widely made.   For example, tungsten oxide nanorods were produced by Khoo’s group [121] and its  bleaching response time was significantly shortened to 4.5 s. Tungsten oxide nanobrick  was  synthesized  by  Kondalkar  et  al.  [122],  possessing  fast  switching  response  with  coloration time and bleaching time of 6.9 and 9.7 s, respectively. Bhosale et al. [123] got  WO3  nanoflowers  film  on  the  HCl‐etched  ITO  substrate,  its  coloration  efficiency  and  cycling stability had also been highly enhanced. Moreover, tungsten oxide quantum‐dots,  [124]  nanowire  arrays  [125,126],  nanobundles  [127],  nanosheets  [128],  nanoflakes  [60],  nanotrees [129,130], and nanoparticle‐nanorod mixed structure [131] have been produced  and tested to have enhanced EC performances.  Doping  tungsten  oxides  with  an  appropriate  amount  of  other  elements  can  have  constructive  effects  on  EC  performances  because  the  introduced  deficiencies,  morphology, and structure changes of the film adjust tungsten oxides’ crystallization and  offer more ion storage sites. Peng et al. [132] got Ti‐doped WO3 thin films that had less  decay  after  200  CV  cycles  than  pure  WO3.  Koo  et  al.  [133]  added  Fe  into  WO3  film.  Compared  with  the  switching  time  of  11.7  and  14.6  s  for  coloring  and  bleaching,  respectively, of bare WO3, those were 7.2 and 2.2 s for 5% Fe‐doped WO3. WO3 films doped  with C [134], N [135], P [136], Ni [126,137], Mo [138,139], Co [140], Sb [141], Ag [142], Au  [143], Gd [144], Tb [145], SiO2 [146], TiO2 [147], V2O5 [148], etc., have been reported before.  Their positive effects on WO3 EC films are summarized in Figure 10.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  22  of  42  Figure 10. Improvements of WO3 film doped with different materials.  4.2. Tungsten Oxides as EC Electrode in NIR Area  Research shows that WO3 thin films have good control of the transmittance of not  only  visible  light  but  also  NIR  and  IR  light  so  the  temperature  can  be  dynamically  modulated, since IR light is the main resource of heat from the sun [36,48,62,149]. Jian et  al.  [150]  reported  that  the  WO3/PEDOT:  PSS  (poly  (3,4‐ethylenedioxythiophene):poly  (styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS).) smart window can effectively reduce the heat across it.  They detected the temperature of the back side of a small chamber that was assembled  with an EC window as its front side (Figure 11a–c). When a halogen lamp worked as a  radiation resource, it turned out that the temperature of the back side of the chamber was  3.3 °C lower as the EC window was darkened compared to the value as the EC window  was bleached, demonstrating the EC film can effectively block heat (Figure 11d). Li et al.  [151]  made  1D  W18O49  nanomaterials  for  NIR  shielding.  These  films  all  had  high  transmittance in the visible light area. However, they did not explore the transmittance  change  during  the  color‐changing  process.  Liu  et  al.  [62]  made  a  flexible  ECD  with  transmission modulation of 63% between 760 and 1600 nm while they did not dig into the  relationship between the transmittance of visible light and NIR light.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  23  of  42  Figure 11. (a) Experiment setup for measurement of the capability of WO3/PH1000‐based ECD on the modulation of solar  heat;  the  thermal‐imaging  photography  of  the  chamber  under  (b)  bleached  state  and  (c)  darkened  state;  (d)  the  temperature  values  of  EC  window  (T1)  and  the  back  side  of  the  chamber  (T2)  under  bleached  and  darkened  states.   from [150]. Copyright Elsevier, 2018.   Adapted with permission 4.2.1. Inverse Opal‐Structured Tungsten Oxides  Inverse opal (IO) structure is a kind of 3D layered porous structure. It is favorable for  its large specific surface area and artificially‐ordered periodic layered configuration. This  structure is often achieved by the template‐assisted method, in which the template used  is opal structure. After the material is deposited on the template, the template is removed,  and the IO structure is obtained. Its large specific surface area was a result of the porosity  obtained  after  the  removal  of  template  material  so  that  electrolyte  penetration  can  be  bettered and the transmission of both electrons and ions are accelerated [146,147]. Owing  to the periodicity and uniformity of the template, the final product also has a periodic and  uniform structure, thus light reflection and refraction can be enhanced and it is beneficial  for effective reduction of visible and NIR light transmittance [146,148,149].  Yang et al. [152] produced an ordered microporous tungsten oxide IO film using PS  with different diameters as the template, followed by the process of removing PS through  immersing the sample into tetrahydrofuran (THF), following which the porous tungsten  oxide film was obtained (Figure 12a,b). Compared with the dense tungsten oxide film, this  porous film showed high optical density and coloration efficiency in the NIR area (Figure  12c,d).  They also  found that smaller  diameter  of the  porous and  higher integration  of  ordered  porous  structure  can  translate  into  better  EC  performances.  Later,  a  uniform  SnO2‐WO3 core‐shell IO structure was reported by Nguyen et al. [153], aiming at good  control  of  the  transmission  of  NIR  radiation  without  reduction  in  the  transmission  of  visible light. They firstly got the SnO2 IO structure on the ITO coated base after removing  PS. Following that was the electrodeposition of WO3. Finally, the specific core‐shell SnO2‐ WO3  IO  structure  was  successfully  obtained.  This  EC  film  displayed  high  visible  transparency of 70.3%, 67.1% at the wavelength of 400 nm at colored state, and blocked  62% of the NIR radiation at the same time. Later, adopting a similar method, Ling et al.  [154]  also  made  a  TiO2–WO3  core–shell  IO  structure,  which  displayed  well  improved  electrochromic performance in the NIR region as well.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  24  of  42  Figure 12. (a) SEM patterns of polystyrene (PS) template and (b) ordered macroporous WO3 films;  (c) optical density and (d) coloration efficiency of WO3 films and ordered macroporous films.  Adapted with permission from [152]. Copyright Elsevier, 2012.   4.2.2. Dynamic Control of Visible and NIR Light of Tungsten Oxide ECDs  Different from the aforementioned studies that realized mere transmittance control  of visible or NIR light, there were reports about dynamic transmittance control of both at  the same time. In other words, when these materials are adopted in EC windows, three  modes can be achieved, namely bright mode when both the transmittance of visible and  NIR light are relatively high; cool mode when the transmittance of visible light is high  while that of NIR light is relatively low; and dark mode when transmittance of both of  them  is  low  [155].  Zhang  et  al.  [155]  synthesized  oxygen‐deficient  tungsten  oxide  nanowires  that  was  able  to  control  the  transmittance  of  NIR  and  visible  light  independently. The film showed bright mode when the potential applied on active film  was 4.0 V, cool mode when the potential was between 2.8 and 2.6 V, and dark mode when  the  potential  was  2.0  V  (Figure  13a–d).  Reports  have  shown  that  amorphous  and  polycrystalline WO3 have different responses of light; that is, the light absorption peak of  amorphous WO3 is more shifted into blue than that of crystalline WO3. Lia et al. [151]  prepared WO3 films with hybrid phases to adjust the transmittance of visible and NIR  light. It is reported that the WO3 flexible ECD they made had three different modes for the  absorption  of  light  in  response  to  the  applied  voltage  because  an  amorphous  and  a  hexagonal phase of WO3 were both observed in the film. When the applied potential was  lower than 1.1 V, the response of the NIR area was more active since the hexagonal portion  of WO3 was at play, while under higher voltages, the response of visible area active for  the amorphous portion was reduced (Figure 13e,f).    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  25  of  42  Figure 13. Optical transmittance spectra of the bulk m‐WO3 film (a) and m‐WO3‐x nanowires film  (b); (c) solar irradiance spectra of m‐WO3‐x nanowires films at 4, 2.8, 2.6 and 2 V; (d) physical  photos of m‐WO3‐x nanowires films on ITO glasses at 4 V, 2.8 V, 2.6 V, and 2 V (vs. Li /Li).  Adapted with permission from [155]. Copyright Royal Society of Chemistry, 2014. (e) Visible‐NIR  spectra showing the change in absorbance when a voltage is applied on the device, between the on  (i.e., negative voltage, reduced tungsten oxide) and the off (i.e., positive voltage, oxidized tungsten  oxide) states at 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, 1.1, 1.3, 1.5, 1.7, and 1.9 V; (f) zoom of the spectra obtained with lower  voltages. Adapted with permission from [156]. Copyright American Chemical Society, 2012.  5. Electrochromic Energy Storage Devices (ECESDs)  As mentioned above, tungsten oxide is not only one of the candidates of electrode  material in ESDs, including LIBs and SCs, but also an excellent material for ECDs. One  device integrating these two functions has come into reality [157,158]. The idea of this  integration rests chiefly on the following arguments. Firstly, ESDs share almost the same  structure with ECDs, the sandwich structure [7,159]. Secondly, the working mechanisms  of these two types of devices are also very similar. They both run relying on the redox  reactions of ions in the electrolyte and active electrodes [160]. Thirdly, in the integrated  device, tungsten oxide materials can be the electrode of the energy storage part and EC  part  at  the  same  time  [161,162].  Of  course,  aside  from  tungsten  oxides,  many  other  materials, especially some transitional metal oxides and conductive polymers, can be used  as the active material in an integrated device as well. For example, bifunctional devices  based on nickel oxide [163], vanadium pentoxide [164], and PANI [165,166] have all been  reported before. These bifunctional devices can show us dynamic color signals, of which  we can make good use to monitor how the device is running and to judge whether the  device needs charging in case of energy cut‐off. For another use, the energy stored in ECDs  can be further used. Another relation is that the close charging and discharging time of  SCs and switching time of EC devices also links them together. Consequently, integration  of ECDs and SCs is more common compared with the integration of ECDs and batteries.  However, in some situations where switching time does not matter that much, like smart  windows and smart sunglasses, integrated ECBs can still have their place. Furthermore,  as researchers are making dedicated efforts towards fast charging techniques of batteries,  this gap is being filled in. In the following subsection, we will discuss tungsten oxides  ECESDs  from  two  main  angles:  research  on  single  tungsten  oxide  electrode  and  exploration on complete ECSCs containing tungsten oxides as an electrode.        Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  26  of  42  5.1. Tungsten Oxides Based ECESDs  Approaches to enhance bifunctional performances of tungsten oxides electrode are  very  similar  to  those  that  improve  electrochromic  performance  and  energy  storage  performances.  They  are  merely  getting  porous  nanostructure,  doping,  and  integrating  tungsten oxide with other materials, especially organic materials (see Tables 1–3). Figure  14  sketches  the  main  modification  methods  adopted  by  researchers.  Most  often,  these  methods are not adopted alone but two or three methods are adopted at the same time.  Table 3 presents the electrochemical and EC performances of tungsten‐based bifunctional  electrodes.  Figure 14. Main modification methods of tungsten oxide‐based materials applied in electrochemical applications.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  27  of  42  Table 3. Performance of tungsten oxide‐based electrochromic energy storage electrodes from literatures.  Electro‐ Electrochromic Performances  Chromic  Products and  Energy Storage  Optical  Color  Method  Energy  Cycling Performances  Switching  Structures  Capacity (C)  Transmittance  Efficiency/( Storage  Time (tc, tb)/s  Modulation (▲T)  cm /C)  Type  1000 cycles, ▲T 83.7% retained  WO3 nanosheets [167]  Hydrothermal  ECSC  64.5% (633 nm)  6.6, 3.8  48.9  14.9 mF/cm   C 84.5% retained  WO3∙H2O nanosheet  Hydrothermal  ECSC  79.0% (633 nm)  10.1, 6.1  42.6  43.30 mF/cm   2000 cycles, ▲T 87.8% retained  [168]  Oxygen‐rich  Oblique‐angle  −1 −1 ECSC  82% (630 nm) ‐‐‐, ‐‐‐  ~170  0.25 A g , 228 F g   2000 cycles, C 75% retained  nanograin WO3 [169]  sputtering  Mesoporous WO3 film  −1 Sol‐gel  ECB  75.6% (633 nm)  2.4, 1.2  79.7  75.3 m A h g   ‐‐‐‐‐‐  [161]  Nb‐doped WO3 film  1000 cycles, ▲T 76.2% retained, C  −1 Sol‐gel  ECB  61.7% (633 nm)  3.6, 2.1  49.7  74.4 m A h g   [170]  75.8% retained  Mo‐doped WO3  56.7% (750 nm),  3.2, 2.6 (750  123.5 (750  3500 cycles, ▲T 57.3% retained;  −1 Hydrothermal  ECB  55.89 m A h g   nanowire arrays [171]  83.0% (1600 nm)  nm)  nm)  4 A/g, 5500 cycles, C 38.2% retained  0.25 mA/cm , 117.1  4000 s, ▲T no obvious change  Amorphous Mo‐ Electrodeposition  ECSC  83.3% (633 nm)  2.1, 2.0  86.1  mF/cm  (334.6 m F  doped WO3 films [162]  −1 1500 cycles, C 83% retained  g )    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  28  of  42  PANI/WO3  Electropolymeriz 1000 cycles, charge density did not  ECSC  35.3% (633 nm)  13.6, 9.9  98.4  5 mV/s, 0.025 F/cm   nanocomposite [172]  ation + annealing  change too much  Color changes:  brownish green‐ WO3/PANI  0.02 mA/cm , 4.1  Chemical bath  ECSC  transparent‐light  ‐‐‐, ‐‐‐  ‐‐‐  800 cycles, C 38% retained  nanocomposite [173]  mF/cm   green‐brownish  green  Solvothermal +  Urchin‐like  −1 electropolymeriza ECB  45% (700nm)  1.9, 1.5  ‐‐‐  ‐‐‐, 831 mA h g   1200 cycles, 516 mA h/g  WO3@PANI [174]  tion  Honeycombed porous  Hydrothermal +  poly(5‐ 26% (505nm); 46%  electrochemical  ECSC  ‐‐‐, ‐‐‐  137 ‐‐‐, 34.1 mF/cm   5000 cycles, C 93% retained  formylindole)/WO (745nm)  3  polymerization  nanocomposites [175]    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  29  of  42  Nanostructures  can  significantly  facilitate  the  electrochemical  activities  of  the  electrode. For example, by hydrothermal method, He et al. [167] made different tungsten  oxide  nanostructures  including  nanospindles,  nanopetals,  nanosheets,  and  nanobricks.  Among  them,  nanosheets  had  better  EC  performance  of  wider  optical  contrast,  faster  switching speed, higher coloration efficiency and capacitive performance of greater areal  capacitance  owing  to  its  significantly  increased  active  sites,  and  facilitated  Li   ions  diffusion  by the large  surface area  and  porous  structure. Soon after,  their  group  [168]  achieved WO3∙H2O nanosheets by a one‐step citric acid‐assisted hydrothermal method  with  no  need  for  a  seed  layer  under  a  relatively  low  temperature  of  90  °C.  The  film  possessed large optical modulation of 79.0% at 633 nm and high areal capacitance of 43.30  −2 mF  cm .  When  the  film  was  fully  charged,  its  color  turned  blue.  Wang  et  al.  [161]  fabricated a mesoporous WO3 film by a template assisted sol‐gel method. It had faster  switching time and higher storage capacity compared with microporous WO3 film owing  to the reduced diffusion length and more exposed active sites in the mesoporous WO3  film. Later, their group [170] also made Nb‐doped WO3 mesoporous cathode film by a sol‐ gel method. The results showed that slight doping of Nb enables the film to have wider  optical modulation range, shorter switching speed, and higher capacitance because the  introduction of the Nb element was accompanied by the introduction of O vacancy which  increased  the  conductivity  of  the  electrode.  Other  studies  [162,171]  reported  that  Mo‐ doped  WO3  film  had  amorphous  and  porous  structure,  and  was  able  to  offer  more  channels for fast ion transfer and active sites for redox reaction.  Many  organic  materials  have  large  energy  storage  capacity  and  outstanding  conductivity  and  are  also  good  candidates  for  EC  materials  and  have  colorful  color  changes  when  voltage  changes.  When  inorganic  and  organic  materials  are  integrated  together, some synergistic effects will occur. As an inorganic material, tungsten oxide has  high electrochemical stability and long cycling life span but poor conductivity. When the  former  organic  materials  integrate  with  tungsten  oxides,  the  final  performance  of  the  composite  can  be  improved  and  the  weaknesses  of  the  single  component  can  be  attenuated. For example, the single‐color display problem of tungsten oxide can be solved.  One popular integrating idea is adding a material that can form donor‐acceptor systems  with tungsten oxide based on tungsten trioxide being an n‐type semiconductor. It has  been reported that this kind of donor‐acceptor pair can have a strong combining force and  it follows that the stability of the composite is highly strong so that the composite may  have long life span [176]. On the other hand, the transport of ions and electrons will be  facilitated.  In  addition,  owing  to  the  introduction  of  the  organic  material,  the  voltage  window of the composite can also be widened. Many researchers have designed novel  donor‐acceptor  pairs.  Wei  et  al.  [172]  electropolymerized  PANI  onto  the  surface  of  tungsten oxide to form nanocomposite. They observed an obvious reduction of oxide peak  currents in the CV curves of the nanocomposite compared to pure PANI owing to the  donor‐acceptor system. Results showed that not only did the nanocomposite have higher  2 −1 2 −1 color efficiency (98.4 cm  C ) than pure tungsten oxide film (36.3 cm  C ) and pure PANI  2 −1 film  (50.0  cm   C ),  but  also  that  its  cycling  performance  was  much  more  stable.  Additionally, the potential window of the nanocomposite is wider than that of the pure  PANI. Similarly, Nwanya et al. [173] also mentioned the slight reduction in CV curves of  the WO3/PANI composite, which led to a more reversible redox reaction of the composite.  Zhang et al. [174] used urchin‐like WO3@PANI composite and showed that the composite  electrode had better cycling stability than pure WO3 and maintained a reversible capacity  −1 of 516 mA h g  after 1200 charge‐discharge cycles (Figure 15a,c). Furthermore, the colors  of the composite were enriched, showing purple, green, yellow, gray, to blue as voltage  changed (Figure 15b). Other organic materials have also been added to form this similar  system. Guo’s group prepared the composite of WO3 and poly (indole‐5‐carboxylic acid)  (P5ICA),  where  P5ICA  is  a  p‐doped  material  [158],  and  nanocomposites  of  WO3  and  poly(5‐  formylindole)  (P5FIn)  where  P5FIn  acted  as  the  p‐doped  semiconductor  [175].  Both composite electrodes showed high capacitance and excellent cycling stability.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  30  of  42  Figure 15. (a) The galvanostatic charge‐discharge profiles of the urchin‐like WO3@PANI electrode at current density of 0.2  −1 A  g ;  the photographs of (b) WO3 and  WO3@PANI under different  voltages; (c) the durability  test  of the  urchin‐like  WO3@PANI composite film for 1200 cycles at a wavelength. Adapted with permission from [174]. Copyright Springer  Nature, 2010. (d) Optical density variation with respect to the charge density at 633 nm. Adapted with permission from  [177]. Copyright John Wiley and Sons, 2015. (e) Basic structure and mechanism of the in situ monitoring system composed  of PANI//WO3 ECSCs and CsPbBr3 perovskite photodetector. Adapted with permission from [178]. Copyright John Wiley  and Sons, 2019.   5.2. Quantitative Judgement of Energy Level Function of Tungsten Oxide Based ECESDs  Full  tungsten  oxide‐based  bifunctional  devices  provide  a  wider  voltage  window,  possess  larger  capacity  and  have  richer  colors  if  an  appropriate  counter  electrode  is  selected. Similar to tungsten oxide‐based ECDs, the counter electrode of the device needs  to  be  transparent.  In  order  to  get  higher  capacitance,  a  counter  electrode  with  large  capacitance is preferred. There have been reports [179,180] about the basic introduction of  ECESDs, therefore, here, we just focus on an interesting characteristic of these devices.  There is a relation between energy storage level (ESL) of the tungsten oxide‐based  bifunctional device and its color, which is why we can get a direct qualitative message of  the device’s state. Yet, in order to get precise judgement about the energy storage state,  exploration of the accurate relationship between optical parameters and electrochemical  parameters or getting help from other detectors is needed. We know that the more charges  inserted into the  EC film, the  deeper  the  color  displayed  on  the tungsten  oxide‐based  bifunctional device and the higher ESL it has. It follows that we can get the qualitative  monitoring by the relationship of transmittance and ESL. Coloration efficiency (CE) is the  bridge between optical parameters and electrochemical parameters. Their relationship is  expressed by the following equation [181,182]:  CE = (log (Tb/Tc))/Q  (5) where Q is the inserted charge density, Tb and Tc are transmittances of bleached state (fully  discharged state) and colored state (fully charged state), respectively.  Because the CE of a device is almost fixed, we can get rough qualitative information  of ESL through the relation of Q and log (Tb/TESL), as in the reports of Cai’s group [177]  (Figure 15d), Bi’s group [183], and He’s group [167]. They painted the curve of optical  density and charge density, though the curve is often used to calculate CE. At the same  time,  it  reflected  the  rough  correspondence  between  optical  parameters  and  electrochemical parameters. Guo et al. [158] further changed the form of the formula into  a more direct expression:    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  31  of  42  CE × Qt × ESL = log (T0/TESL)  (6) where Qt is the total charge that can be stored in the device, T0 is the transmittance of the  device  fully  discharged,  and  TESL  is  the  real‐time  transmittance  of  the  device.  They  achieved quantitative monitoring of device by getting the linear link of ESL and the optical  density at the wavelength of 600 nm. Moreover, Sun et al. [178] successfully achieved the  in‐situ monitoring of the ESL of bifunctional device constantly and accurately with the  help  of  an  inorganic  CsPbBr3  perovskite  photodetector,  based  on  the  PANI//WO3  bifunctional  ECESD  they  reported  earlier  (Figure  15e).  This  photodetector  detects  according to the change of response current to a green laser with the wavelength of 520  nm penetrated through the bifunctional device. It was so sensitive that even a voltage  difference as small as 47.2 mV (charge variation of 0.33 mC) could be detected.  6. Solar Cell and Tungsten Oxide‐Based EC Integrated Multifunctional Devices  The  perfect  use  of  tungsten  oxide‐based  bifunctional  ECESDs  is  the  use  of  smart  windows,  as  it  can  control  the  brightness  and  temperature  in  the  room  under  a  comfortable state by changing its transmittance of sunlight [184]. In addition, they can  serve as a power to drive small electrical appliance like bulbs. Based on the position of  this device, the introduction of a photovoltaic solar cell is natural and feasible. This idea  is  backed  by  the  following  reasons.  Firstly,  the  open  circuit  voltage  of  the  solar  cells  matches  the  relevantly  low  driving  voltage  of  the  tungsten  oxide‐based  bifunctional  device well [30,140]. Secondly, their positions in a building are not exclusive so that they  can operate free of the influence of each other, thus achieving highly efficient energy use  [185].  Generally, the introduction of a solar self‐powering part may have two main different  forms. One is that the ECESD and the sunlight conversion device are separate and they  are connected through wires outside the device. For example, Zhong’s group [59], Bi’s  group [31] (Figure 16a,b), and Xie’s group [55] connected the tungsten oxide‐based ECESD  with silicon solar cell, Xia’s group [166] with perovskite solar cell, and Xie’s group [186]  with dye‐sensitized solar cells to achieve a self‐powering system. Results showed that the  bifunctional device can be fully charged without external power. Then, they can output  energy in many forms including lighting up an LED bulb and the whole process can be  continuously monitored by the color on the bifunctional device. Xu et al. [184] designed a  new  structure  of  the  integrated  system  in  which  a  tungsten  oxide‐based  bifunctional  device played as the glass and the fiber‐shaped dye‐sensitized solar cells served as the  frame of the window so that space can be effectively used (Figure 17a). The shining point  of  this  new  system  is  that  the  numbers  of  the  solar  cells  can  be  changed  and  when  converting,  they  are  free  of  the  incidence  angle  since  the  frame  was  designed  in  a  cylindrical configuration.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  32  of  42  Figure 16. Integration of electrochromic energy storing device (ECESD) with silicon‐based solar  cells. (a) The circuit diagram of the smart operating system; (b) from left to right, ECESD is  charging by solar cell, one ECESD can independently drive an LCD screen and two ECESDs in  series can lighten a red LED. Adapted with permission from [31]. Copyright American Chemical  Society, 2017.   Figure 17. (a) Schematic diagram of the integrated system. Adapted with permission from [184].  Copyright Elsevier, 2019. (b) Schematic of charging routes for W18O49/PANI‐EC battery. Adapted  with permission from [187]. Copyright Elsevier, 2018.   In  addition  to  merely  powering  the  bifunctional  device,  the  whole  self‐powering  smart window system can modulate its transmittance automatically in response to the  changing weather condition. That is to say, when it is sunny, the solar cell can generate  enough power to turn the window into dark state so that most of the sunlight is blocked  to keep the room with a comfortable atmosphere and when it is cloudy, the generated    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  33  of  42  power is not enough for the window to turn dark and light can partly penetrate through  so that the room is still bright. This process was achieved in a report by Yun et al. [188]  who took the solar cell as an automatic smart controller to modulate the transmittance of  the tungsten‐based bifunctional device according to the weather.  The other type is that one device has three functions at the same time, namely solar‐ electricity conversion, EC and energy storage and powering, with no need for external  wires.  The  EC  part  and  PV  part  share  the  same  electrolyte  and  typically,  this  kind  of  integrated method has to sacrifice a certain area of the window. For example, Zhang et al.  [30] designed a trifunctional device, photoelectrochromic device (PECD), in which WO3  and TiO2 were both used as the anode and Pt was used as the counter electrode (Figure  18a,b). When the device is open circuit and exposed to sunlight, dye molecules in the  electrolyte  are  excited  and  electron‐hole  pairs  are  generated.  Then,  the  electrons  are  2 and later diffused to the ITO‐PET substrate and  injected into the conduction band of TiO then WO3, so WO3 film turns blue and the sunlight is blocked by the device as a result.  The colored device can discharge when connected with electric applications. Based on  tungsten oxide and PANI as the cathode and Al as the anode, Chang et al. [187] developed  a multifunctional device that can be powered through two methods, by sunlight and by  being exposed to the air (Figure 17b). Compared to the charging method without sunlight  radiation, the time needed for the device to be fully charged is six times shorter.  Figure 18. (a) Schematic diagrams of the trifunctional device; (b) photograph of the enlarged  photoelectrochromic device (PECD) at the bleached state. Adapted with permission from [30].   7. Other Applications of Tungsten Oxides‐Based Materials  Tungsten oxide is also an outstanding material in the photochromism field. When  light is shed on tungsten oxide, electron‐hole pairs are generated, leading to the change of  optical absorption of them. What reflects directly to us is their color changes, and they can  be applied as displays,  smart windows, and optical signal processing. Wei et al. [189]  indicated intrinsic WO3 with color change between yellow and blue when exposed to UV  illumination.  Zhang  et  al.  [190]  also  synthesized  tungsten  oxide@poly(N‐isopropyla‐  crylamide) composite spheres that had excellent response speed and impressed coloration  efficiency. Finally, Wang et al. [191] have a comprehensive review about tungsten oxides‐ based photochromic materials.  The bandgap of WO3 in bulk is around 2.6 eV [192], so that it can absorb light with  wavelengths up to 475 nm, indicating that it is a superior photocatalyst in the visible light  area compared with TiO2 of which the band gap is 3.2 eV [33]. Currently, tungsten oxide‐ based materials as photocatalysts, are widely applied in CO2 photoreduction [193], air  purification [194],  and other fields. Specifically, in the photoelectrochemical cell (PEC)    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  34  of  42  water‐splitting field, tungsten oxides are also widely used. For example, J. Fu et al. [195]  produced  2D/2D  WO3/g‐C3N4  and  it  showed  good  H2‐production  activity.  Moreover,  owing to its relative lower band gap, tungsten oxides are often applied to composite with  TiO2 to expand the photoresponse of the composite into the visible light range [196,197].  For example, the composite of WO3/TiO2 made by Castro et al. [197] has a bandgap energy  of 3.23 eV, which is between the values of pristine TiO2 and WO3, resulting in better light  absorption at the visible range and higher efficiency of water splitting.  Another useful application of tungsten oxides is as gas sensors. As mentioned above,  WO3 is a kind of n‐type semiconductor of which the conductivity largely depends on the  electrons within it. When it touches reductive gas, its conductivity will increase, while  when it is exposed to oxidative gas, it decreases. By having the data of the conductivity  changes, we can realize the detection of specific gases, like H2, H2S [198], CO, NH3 [199],  NOx [200,201], and some organic gases [202,203]. For instance, Liang et al. [203] produced  ultra‐thin WO3 nanosheets with dominant {002} crystal facets that have been proven to  have improved xylene‐sensing performance. Ji et al. [199] reported that tightly arranged  nanosheet‐assembled  flower‐like  WO3  nanostructures  showed  better  NH3‐sensing  performances compared with tightly arranged WO3 nanostructures.  8. Summary and Outlook  In summary, tungsten oxides are attractive for their numerous possibilities in various  fields,  particularly  in  energy  storage  like  LIBs,  SCs,  and  electrochromisms.  Tungsten  oxide‐based multifunctional devices have also been widely explored based on the links  between ESDs and ECDs. Furthermore, integration of solar converting system is a very  effective way to realize a green application. Despite that the fact that much effort has been  made in the research of tungsten oxides, there are many challenges to deal with. When  tungsten  oxides  are  used  as  the  electrode  in  ESDs,  low  specific  capacity,  poor  electric  conductivity,  and  unsatisfied  cycling  stability  still  need  to  be  improved.  Furthermore,  research about the tungsten oxide‐based full ESDs are still rare. When they are applied in  ECDs,  their  performance  in  the  NIR  area  needs  more  attention.  The  bifunctional  applications  mentioned  in  this  article  also  have  weaknesses  like  single  color,  narrow  voltage window, and low capacity, restricting their application to real uses. Apart from  the aforementioned integration with solar cells, tungsten oxide‐based devices call for new  functions. For novel applications, such as flexible devices and self‐powering methods by  air or electrochemical reactions that have been reported before, improvements are still  needed.  Author Contributions: W.H.: Conceptualization, Investigation, Writing—original draft  preparation, Visualization, Writing—Review and Editing, Q.S.: Writing—Review and Editing,  R.H.: Investigation, Writing—original draft preparation, Writing—Review and Editing. All  authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos.  52071144, 51621001, 51822104 and 51831009).  Data Availability Statement: All authors ensure that data shared are in accordance with consent  provided by participants on the use of confidential data.  Acknowledgments: This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of  China (Nos. 52071144, 51621001, 51822104 and 51831009).  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Divya, K.; Østergaard, J. Battery energy storage technology for power systems—An overview. Electr. Power Syst. Res. 2009, 79,  511–520, doi:10.1016/j.epsr.2008.09.017.  2. Amrouche, S.O.; Rekioua, D.; Bacha, S. Overview of energy storage in renewable energy systems. Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 2016,  41, 20914–20927, doi:10.1016/j.ijhydene.2016.06.243.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  35  of  42  3. González, A.; Goikolea, E.; Barrena, J.A.; Mysyk, R. Review on supercapacitors: Technologies and materials. Renew. Sustain.  Energy Rev. 2016, 58, 1189–1206, doi:10.1016/j.rser.2015.12.249.  4. Baptista,  J.M.;  Sagu,  J.S.;  Kg,  U.W.;  Lobato,  K.  State‐of‐the‐art  materials  for  high  power  and  high  energy  supercapacitors:  Performance metrics and obstacles for the transition from lab to industrial scale—A critical approach. Chem. Eng. J. 2019, 374,  1153–1179, doi:10.1016/j.cej.2019.05.207.  5. Goodenough,  J.B.;  Park,  K.‐S.  The  Li‐Ion  Rechargeable  Battery:  A  Perspective.  J.  Am.  Chem.  Soc.  2013,  135,  1167–1176,  doi:10.1021/ja3091438.  6. Deb, S. Opportunities and challenges of electrochromic phenomena in transition metal oxides. Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 1992,  25, 327–338, doi:10.1016/0927‐0248(92)90077‐3.  7. Granqvist, C. Handbook of Inorganic Electrochromic Materials; Elsevier Science: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1995.  8. Granqvist, C.G. Oxide electrochromics: An introduction to devices and materials. Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 2012, 99, 1–13,  doi:10.1016/j.solmat.2011.08.021.  9. Poonam; Sharma, K.; Arora, A.; Tripathi, S. Review of supercapacitors: Materials and devices. J. Energy Storage 2019, 21, 801– 825, doi:10.1016/j.est.2019.01.010.  10. Conway, B.E. Electrochemical Supercapacitors: Scientific Fundamentals and Technological Applications; Plenum Press: New York, NY,  USA, 1999.  11. Shukla, A.; Banerjee, A.; Ravikumar, M.; Jalajakshi, A. Electrochemical capacitors: Technical challenges and prognosis for future  markets. Electrochimica Acta 2012, 84, 165–173, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2012.03.059.  12. Etacheri, V.; Marom, R.; Elazari, R.; Salitra, G.; Aurbach, D. Challenges in the development of advanced Li‐ion batteries: A  review. Energy Environ. Sci. 2011, 4, 3243–3262, doi:10.1039/c1ee01598b.  13. Hu, R.; Liu, H.; Zeng, M.; Liu, J.; Zhu, M. Progress on Sn‐based thin‐film anode materials for lithium‐ion batteries. Chin. Sci.  Bull. 2012, 57, 4119–4130, doi:10.1007/s11434‐012‐5303‐z.  14. Hu, R.; Zhang, H.; Bu, Y.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, B.; Yang, C. Porous Co3O4 nanofibers surface‐modified by reduced graphene oxide  as a durable, high‐rate anode for lithiumion battery. Electrochim. Acta 2017, 228, 241–250, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2017.01.067.  15. Li, W.‐J.; Fu, Z.‐W. Nanostructured WO3 thin film as a new anode material for lithium‐ion batteries. Appl. Surf. Sci. 2010, 256,  2447–2452, doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2009.10.085.  16. Monk, P.; Mortimer, R.; Rosseinsky, D. Electrochromism and Electrochromic Devices; Cambridge University Press: New York, NY,  USA, 2007.  17. Pérez‐Lombard, L.; Ortiz, J.; Pout, C. A review on buildings energy consumption information. Energy Build. 2008, 40, 394–398,  doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2007.03.007.  18. Azens, A.; Granqvist, C.G. Electrochromic smart windows: Energy efficiency and device aspects. J. Solid State Electrochem. 2003,  7, 64–68, doi:10.1007/s10008‐002‐0313‐4.  19. Tang, W.; Liu, L.; Tian, S.; Li, L.; Yue, Y.; Wu, Y.; Zhu, K. Aqueous supercapacitors of high energy density based on MoO3  nanoplates as anode material. Chem. Commun. 2011, 47, 10058–10060, doi:10.1039/c1cc13474d.  20. Cheng, X.; Li, Y.; Sang, L.; Ma, J.; Shi, H.; Liu, X.; Lu, J.; Zhang, Y. Boosting the electrochemical performance of MoO3 anode for  long‐life  lithium  ion  batteries:  Dominated  by  an  ultrathin  TiO2  passivation  layer.  Electrochim.  Acta  2018,  269,  241–249,  doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2018.03.009.  21. Zheng, L.; Xu, Y.; Jin, D.; Xie, Y. Novel Metastable Hexagonal MoO3Nanobelts: Synthesis, Photochromic, and Electrochromic  Properties. Chem. Mater. 2009, 21, 5681–5690, doi:10.1021/cm9023887.  22. Liu, K.‐Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, W.; Zheng, H.; Su, G. Charge‐discharge process of MnO2 supercapacitor. Trans. Nonferrous Met.  Soc. China 2007, 17, 649–653, doi:10.1016/s1003‐6326(07)60150‐2.  23. Chen, J.; Wang, Y.; He, X.; Xu, S.; Fang, M.; Zhao, X.; Shang, Y. Electrochemical properties of MnO 2 nanorods as anode materials  for lithium ion batteries. Electrochim. Acta 2014, 142, 152–156, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2014.07.089.  24. Sakai, N.; Ebina, Y.; Takada, K.; Sasaki, T. Electrochromic Films Composed of MnO[sub 2] Nanosheets with Controlled Optical  Density and High Coloration Efficiency. J. Electrochem. Soc. 2005, 152, E384–E389, doi:10.1149/1.2104227.  25. Granqvist, C. Electrochromic tungsten oxide films: Review of progress 1993–1998. Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 2000, 60, 201–262,  doi:10.1016/s0927‐0248(99)00088‐4.  26. Zhu,  M.; Meng,  W.; Huang, Y.; Zhi, C. Proton‐Insertion‐Enhanced  Pseudocapacitance Based on the Assembly  Structure of  Tungsten Oxide. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2014, 6, 18901–18910, doi:10.1021/am504756u.  27. Deb, S.K. A Novel Electrophotographic System. Appl. Opt. 1969, 8, 192–195, doi:10.1364/ao.8.s1.000192.  28. Yun,  T.G.;  Park,  M.;  Kim,  D.‐H.;  Kim,  D.;  Cheong,  J.Y.;  Bae,  J.G.;  Han,  S.M.;  Kim,  I.‐D.  All‐Transparent  Stretchable  Electrochromic Supercapacitor Wearable Patch Device. ACS Nano 2019, 13, 3141–3150, doi:10.1021/acsnano.8b08560.  29. Cannavale, A.; Manca, M.; Malara, F.; De Marco, L.; Cingolani, R.; Gigli, G. Highly efficient smart photovoltachromic devices  with tailored electrolyte composition. Energy Environ. Sci. 2011, 4, 2567–2574, doi:10.1039/c1ee01231b.  30. Zhang,  D.;  Sun,  B.;  Huang,  H.;  Gan,  Y.;  Xia,  Y.;  Liang,  C.;  Zhang,  W.;  Zhang,  J.  A  Solar‐Driven  Flexible  Electrochromic  Supercapacitor. Materials 2020, 13, 1206, doi:10.3390/ma13051206.  31. Bi, Z.; Li, X.; Chen, Y.; He, X.; Xu, X.; Gao, X. Large‐Scale Multifunctional Electrochromic‐Energy Storage Device Based on  Tungsten  Trioxide  Monohydrate  Nanosheets  and  Prussian  White.  ACS  Appl.  Mater.  Interfaces  2017,  9,  29872–29880,  doi:10.1021/acsami.7b08656.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  36  of  42  32. Buch,  V.R.;  Chawla,  A.K.;  Rawal,  S.K.  Review  on  electrochromic  property  for  WO3  thin  films  using  different  deposition  techniques. Mater. Today Proc. 2016, 3, 1429–1437, doi:10.1016/j.matpr.2016.04.025.  33. Dong,  P.;  Hou,  G.;  Xi,  X.;  Shao,  R.;  Dong,  F.  WO3‐based  photocatalysts:  Morphology  control,  activity  enhancement  and  multifunctional applications. Environ. Sci. Nano 2017, 4, 539–557, doi:10.1039/c6en00478d.  34. Hariharan, V.; Gnanavel, B.; Sathiyapriya, R.; Aroulmoji, V. A Review on Tungsten Oxide (WO3) and their Derivatives for  Sensor Applications. Int. J. Adv. Sci. Eng. 2019, 5, 1163–1168, doi:10.29294/ijase.5.4.2019.1163‐1168.  35. Vogt, T.; Woodward, P.M.; A.; Hunter, B.; Vogt, T. The High‐Temperature Phases of WO3. J. Solid State Chem. 1999, 144, 209– 215, doi:10.1006/jssc.1999.8173.  36. Rao, M. Structure and properties of WO3 thin films for electrochromic device application. J. Non‐Oxide Glas. 2013, 5, 1–8.  in WO3 Thin Films.  37. Ramana, C.V.; Utsunomiya, S.; Ewing, R.C.; Julien, C.; Becker, U. Structural Stability and Phase Transitions  J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 10430–10435, doi:10.1021/jp056664i.  38. Gerand, B.; Nowogrocki, G.; Guenot, J.; Figlarz, M. Structural study of a new hexagonal form of tungsten trioxide. J. Solid State  Chem. 1979, 29, 429–434, doi:10.1016/0022‐4596(79)90199‐3.  39. Sun, W.; Yeung, M.T.; Lech, A.T.; Lin, C.‐W.; Lee, C.; Li, T.; Duan, X.; Zhou, J.; Kaner, R.B. High Surface Area Tunnels in  Hexagonal WO3. Nano Lett. 2015, 15, 4834–4838, doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b02013.  40. Balaji, S.; Djaoued, Y.; Albert, A.‐S.; Ferguson, R.Z.; Brüning, R. Hexagonal Tungsten Oxide Based Electrochromic Devices:  Spectroscopic Evidence for the Li Ion Occupancy of Four‐Coordinated Square Windows. Chem. Mater. 2009, 21, 1381–1389,  doi:10.1021/cm8034455.  41. Roussel, P.; Labbé, P.; Groult, D. Symmetry and twins in the monophosphate tungsten bronze series (PO2)4(WO3)2m (2 ≤ m ≤  14). Acta Crystallogr. Sect. B Struct. Sci. 2000, 56, 377–391, doi:10.1107/s0108768199016195.  42. Zhang, L.; Wang, H.; Liu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Yan, H. Nonstoichiometric tungsten oxide: Structure, synthesis, and applications. J.  Mater. Sci. Mater. Electron. 2019, 31, 861–873, doi:10.1007/s10854‐019‐02596‐z.  43. Makarov,  V.;  Trontelj,  M.  Sintering  and  electrical  conductivity  of  doped  WO3.  J.  Eur.  Ceram.  Soc.  1996,  16,  791–794,  doi:10.1016/0955‐2219(95)00204‐9.  44. Sahle, W.; Nygren, M. Electrical conductivity and high resolution electron microscopy studies of WO3−x crystals with 0 ≤ x ≤  0.28. J. Solid State Chem. 1983, 48, 154–160, doi:10.1016/0022‐4596(83)90070‐1.  45. Liao, C.‐C.; Chen, F.‐R.; Kai, J.‐J. Annealing effect on electrochromic properties of tungsten oxide nanowires. Sol. Energy Mater.  Sol. Cells 2007, 91, 1258–1266, doi:10.1016/j.solmat.2007.04.014.  46. Augustyn, V.; Gogotsi, Y. 2D Materials with Nanoconfined Fluids for Electrochemical Energy Storage. Joule 2017, 1, 443–452,  doi:10.1016/j.joule.2017.09.008.  47. Judeinstein, P.; Livage, J. Role of the water content on the electrochromic properties of WO3, thin films. Mater. Sci. Eng. B 1989,  3, 129–132, doi:10.1016/0921‐5107(89)90191‐8.  48. Liang, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhou, Y.; Xie, J.; Zhang, X.; Guan, M.; Pan, B.; Xie, Y. High‐performance flexible electrochromic device based  on  facile  semiconductor‐to‐metal  transition  realized  by  WO3∙2H2O  ultrathin  nanosheets.  Sci.  Rep.  2013,  3,  e01936,  doi:10.1038/srep01936.  49. Shinde,  P.A.; Seo, Y.; Ray, C.; Jun, S.C.  Direct growth  of WO3 nanostructures  on  multi‐walled carbon nanotubes  for high‐ performance  flexible  all‐solid‐state  asymmetric  supercapacitor.  Electrochim.  Acta  2019,  308,  231–242,  doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2019.03.159.  50. He, X.; Wang, X.; Sun, B.; Wan, J.; Wang, Y.; He, D.; Suo, H.; Zhao, C. Synthesis of three‐dimensional hierarchical furball‐like  tungsten  trioxide  microspheres  for  high  performance  supercapacitor  electrodes.  RSC  Adv.  2020,  10,  13437–13441,  doi:10.1039/c9ra10995a.  51. Zheng, F.; Wang, J.; Liu, W.; Zhou, J.; Li, H.; Yu, Y.; Hu, P.; Yan, W.; Liu, Y.; Li, R.; et al. Novel diverse‐structured h‐WO3  nanoflake  arrays  as  electrode  materials  for  high  performance  supercapacitors.  Electrochim.  Acta  2020,  334,  135641,  doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2020.135641.  52. Jia, J.; Liu, X.; Mi, R.; Liu, N.; Xiong, Z.; Yuan, L.; Wang, C.; Sheng, G.; Cao, L.; Zhou, X.; et al. Self‐assembled pancake‐like  hexagonal  tungsten  oxide  with  ordered  mesopores  for  supercapacitors.  J.  Mater.  Chem.  A  2018,  6,  15330–15339,  doi:10.1039/c8ta05292a.  53. Li, C.; Hsieh, J.; Su, T.; Wu, P. Experimental study on property and electrochromic function of stacked WO3/Ta2O5/NiO films  by sputtering. Thin Solid Films 2018, 660, 373–379, doi:10.1016/j.tsf.2018.06.041.  54. Chen, P.‐W.; Chang, C.‐T.; Ko, T.‐F.; Hsu, S.‐C.; Li, K.‐D.; Wu, J.‐Y. Fast response of complementary electrochromic device based  on WO3/NiO electrodes. Sci. Rep. 2020, 10, 1–12, doi:10.1038/s41598‐020‐65191‐x.  55. Xie, S.; Chen, Y.; Bi, Z.; Jia, S.; Guo, X.; Gao, X.; Li, X. Energy storage smart window with transparent‐to‐dark electrochromic  behavior and improved pseudocapacitive performance. Chem. Eng. J. 2019, 370, 1459–1466, doi:10.1016/j.cej.2019.03.242.  56. Mjejri, I.; Gaudon, M.; Rougier, A. Mo addition for improved electrochromic properties of V2O5 thick films. Sol. Energy Mater.  Sol. Cells 2019, 198, 19–25, doi:10.1016/j.solmat.2019.04.010.  57. Wang,  K.;  Zhang,  H.;  Chen,  G.;  Tian,  T.;  Tao,  K.;  Liang,  L.;  Gao,  J.;  Cao,  H.  Long‐term‐stable  WO3‐PB  complementary  electrochromic devices. J. Alloys Compd. 2021, 861, 158534, doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2020.158534.  58. Pham, N.S.; Seo, Y.H.; Park, E.; Nguyen, T.D.D.; Shin, I.‐S. Implementation of high‐performance electrochromic device based  on  all‐solution‐fabricated  Prussian  blue  and  tungsten  trioxide  thin  film.  Electrochim.  Acta  2020,  353,  136446,  doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2020.136446.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  37  of  42  59. Zhong, Y.; Chai, Z.; Liang, Z.; Sun, P.; Xie, W.; Zhao, C.; Mai, W. Electrochromic Asymmetric Supercapacitor Windows Enable  Direct  Determination  of  Energy  Status  by  the  Naked  Eye.  ACS  Appl.  Mater.  Interfaces  2017,  9,  34085–34092,  doi:10.1021/acsami.7b10334.  60. Sun, S.; Lu, T.; Chang, X.; Hu, X.; Dong, L.; Yin, Y. Flexible electrochromic device based on WO3∙H2O nanoflakes synthesized  by a facile sonochemical method. Mater. Lett. 2016, 185, 319–322, doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2016.08.154.  61. Ma,  D.;  Li,  T.;  Xu,  Z.;  Wang,  L.;  Wang,  J.  Electrochromic  devices  based  on  tungsten  oxide  films  with  honeycomb‐like  nanostructures and nanoribbons array. Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 2018, 177, 51–56, doi:10.1016/j.solmat.2017.06.009.  62. Liu, Q.; Dong, G.; Xiao, Y.; Gao, F.; Wang, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S.; Zuo, H.; Diao, X. An all‐thin‐film inorganic electrochromic  device monolithically fabricated on flexible PET/ITO substrate by magnetron sputtering. Mater. Lett. 2015, 142, 232–234, doi:  10.1016/j.matlet.2014.11.151.  63. Yue, Y.; Li, H.; Li, K.; Wang, J.; Wang, H.; Zhang, Q.; Li, Y.; Chen, P. High‐performance complementary electrochromic device  based  on  WO  3 ∙0.33H  2  O/PEDOT  and  prussian  blue  electrodes.  J.  Phys.  Chem.  Solids  2017,  110,  284–289,  doi:10.1016/j.jpcs.2017.06.022.  64. Hashimoto, S.; Matsuoka, H. Mechanism of electrochromism for amorphous WO3thin films. J. Appl. Phys. 1991, 69, 933–937,  doi:10.1063/1.347335.  65. Hersh,  H.N.;  Kramer,  W.E.;  McGee,  J.H.  Mechanism  of  electrochromism  in  WO3.  Appl.  Phys.  Lett.  1975,  27,  646–648,  doi:10.1063/1.88346.  66. Qiu,  D.;  Ji,  H.;  Zhang,  X.;  Zhang,  H.;  Cao,  H.;  Chen,  G.;  Tian,  T.;  Chen,  Z.;  Guo,  X.;  Liang,  L.;  et  al.  Electrochromism  of  Nanocrystal‐in‐Glass  Tungsten  Oxide  Thin  Films  under  Various  Conduction  Cations.  Inorg.  Chem.  2019,  58,  2089–2098,  doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.8b03178.  67. Yao, S.; Zheng, X.; Zhang, X.; Xiao, H.; Qu, F.; Wu, X. Facile synthesis of flexible WO3 nanofibers as supercapacitor electrodes.  Mater. Lett. 2017, 186, 94–97, doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2016.09.085.  68. Wang, R.; Lu, Y.; Zhou, L.; Han, Y.; Ye, J.; Xu, W.; Lu, X.; Lu, Y. Oxygen‐deficient tungsten oxide nanorods with high crystallinity:  Promising stable anode for asymmetric supercapacitors. Electrochim. Acta 2018, 283, 639–645, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2018.06.188.  69. Yin, Z.; Bu, Y.; Ren, J.; Chen, S.; Zhao, D.; Zou, Y.; Shen, S.; Yang, D. Triggering superior sodium ion adsorption on (2 0 0) facet  of  mesoporous  WO3  nanosheet  arrays  for  enhanced  supercapacitance.  Chem.  Eng.  J.  2018,  345,  165–173,  doi:10.1016/j.cej.2018.03.100.  70. Wu, X.; Yao, S. Flexible electrode materials based on WO3 nanotube bundles for high performance energy storage devices. Nano  Energy 2017, 42, 143–150, doi:10.1016/j.nanoen.2017.10.058.  71. Gao, L.; Wang, X.; Xie, Z.; Song, W.; Wang, L.; Wu, X.; Qu, F.; Chen, D.; Shen, G. High‐performance energy‐storage devices  based on WO3 nanowire arrays/carbon cloth integrated electrodes. J. Mater. Chem. A 2013, 1, 7167–7173, doi:10.1039/c3ta10831g.  72. Shinde,  P.A.;  Lokhande,  A.C.;  Patil,  A.M.;  Lokhande,  C.D.  Facile  synthesis  of  self‐assembled  WO3  nanorods  for  high‐ performance electrochemical capacitor. J. Alloys Compd. 2019, 770, 1130–1137, doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2018.08.194.  73. Shinde,  P.A.;  Lokhande,  A.C.;  Chodankar,  N.R.;  Patil,  A.M.;  Kim,  J.H.;  Lokhande,  C.D.  Temperature  dependent  surface  morphological modifications of hexagonal WO3 thin films for high performance supercapacitor application. Electrochim. Acta  2017, 224, 397–404, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2016.12.066.  74. Nayak,  A.K.;  Das,  A.K.;  Pradhan,  D.  High  Performance  Solid‐State  Asymmetric  Supercapacitor  using  Green  Synthesized  Graphene–WO3 Nanowires Nanocomposite. ACS Sustain. Chem. Eng. 2017, 5, 10128–10138, doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b02135.  75. Jung, J.; Kim, H. W 18 O 49 nanowires assembled on carbon felt for application to supercapacitors. Appl. Surf. Sci. 2018, 433,  750–755, doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2017.10.109.  76. Xu, J.; Ding, T.; Wang, J.; Zhang, J.; Wang, S.; Chen, C.; Fang, Y.; Wu, Z.; Huo, K.; Dai, J. Tungsten Oxide Nanofibers Self‐ assembled Mesoscopic Microspheres as High‐performance Electrodes for Supercapacitor. Electrochim. Acta 2015, 174, 728–734,  doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2015.06.044.  77. Shao, Z.; Fan, X.; Liu, X.; Yang, Z.; Wang, L.; Chen, Z.; Zhang, W. Hierarchical micro/nanostructured WO3 with structural water  for high‐performance pseudocapacitors. J. Alloys Compd. 2018, 765, 489–496, doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2018.06.192.  78. Gupta, S.P.; Patil, V.B.; Tarwal, N.L.; Bhame, S.D.; Gosavi, S.W.; Mulla, I.S.; Late, D.J.; Suryavanshi, S.S.; Walke, P.S. Enhanced  energy density and stability of self‐assembled cauliflower of Pd doped monoclinic WO3 nanostructure supercapacitor. Mater.  Chem. Phys. 2019, 225, 192–199, doi:10.1016/j.matchemphys.2018.12.077.  79. Zheng, F.; Gong, H.; Li, Z.; Yang, W.; Xu, J.; Hu, P.; Li, Y.; Gong, Y.; Zhen, Q. Tertiary structure of cactus‐like WO 3 spheres self‐ assembled  on  Cu  foil  for  supercapacitive  electrode  materials.  J.  Alloys  Compd.  2017,  712,  345–354,  doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2017.04.094.  80. Ji, S.‐H.; Chodankar, N.R.; Kim, D.‐H. Aqueous asymmetric supercapacitor based on RuO2‐WO3 electrodes. Electrochim. Acta  2019, 325, 134879, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2019.134879.  81. Upadhyay, K.K.; Altomare, M.; Eugénio, S.; Schmuki, P.; Silva, T.M.; Montemor, M.F. On the Supercapacitive Behaviour of  Anodic Porous WO3‐Based Negative Electrodes. Electrochim. Acta 2017, 232, 192–201, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2017.02.131.  82. Ma, L.; Zhou, X.; Xu, L.; Xu, X.; Zhang, L.; Ye, C.; Luo, J.; Chen, W. Hydrothermal preparation and supercapacitive performance    flower‐like  WO3∙H2O/reduced  graphene  oxide  composite.  Colloids  Surf.  A  Physicochem.  Eng.  Asp.  2015,  481,  609–615,  of doi:10.1016/j.colsurfa.2015.06.040.  83. Di,  J.;  Xu,  H.;  Gai,  X.;  Yang,  R.;  Zheng,  H.  One‐step  solvothermal  synthesis  of  feather  duster‐like  CNT@WO3  as  high‐ performance electrode for supercapacitor. Mater. Lett. 2019, 246, 129–132, doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2019.03.070.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  38  of  42  84. Chu, J.; Lu, D.; Wang, X.; Wang, X.; Xiong, S. WO3 nanoflower coated with graphene nanosheet: Synergetic energy storage  composite electrode for supercapacitor application. J. Alloys Compd. 2017, 702, 568–572, doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2017.01.226.  85. Liu, X.; Sheng, G.; Zhong, M.; Zhou, X. Hybrid nanowires and nanoparticles of WO3 in a carbon aerogel for supercapacitor  applications. Nanoscale 2018, 10, 4209–4217, doi:10.1039/c7nr07191d.  86. Liu, X.; Sheng, G.; Zhong, M.; Zhou, X. Dispersed and size‐selected WO3 nanoparticles in carbon aerogel for supercapacitor  applications. Mater. Des. 2018, 141, 220–229, doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2017.12.038.  87. Shinde, P.A.; Lokhande, V.C.; Patil, A.M.; Ji, T.; Lokhande, C.D. Single‐step hydrothermal synthesis of WO3‐MnO2 composite  as  an  active  material  for  all‐solid‐state  flexible  asymmetric  supercapacitor.  Int.  J.  Hydrogen  Energy  2018,  43,  2869–2880,  doi:10.1016/j.ijhydene.2017.12.093.  88. Yuan, C.; Lin, H.; Lu, H.; Xing, E.; Zhang, Y.; Xie, B. Anodic deposition and capacitive property of nano‐WO3∙H2O/MnO2  composite as supercapacitor electrode material. Mater. Lett. 2015, 148, 167–170, doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2015.01.146.  89. Periasamy, P.; Krishnakumar, T.; Sandhiya, M.; Sathish, M.; Chavali, M.; Siril, P.F.; Devarajan, V. Preparation and comparison  of hybridized WO3–V2O5 nanocomposites electrochemical supercapacitor performance in KOH and H2SO4 electrolyte. Mater.  Lett. 2019, 236, 702–705, doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2018.11.050.  90. Hai,  Z.;  Akbari,  M.K.;  Xue,  C.;  Xu,  H.;  Solano,  E.;  Detavernier,  C.;  Hu,  J.;  Zhuiykov,  S.  Atomically‐thin  WO  3  /TiO  2  heterojunction  for  supercapacitor  electrodes  developed  by  atomic  layer  deposition.  Compos.  Commun.  2017,  5,  31–35,  doi:10.1016/j.coco.2017.06.001.  91. Hai, Z.; Akbari, M.K.; Wei, Z.; Xue, C.; Xu, H.; Hu, J.; Hyde, L.; Zhuiykov, S. TiO 2 nanoparticles‐functionalized two‐dimensional  WO 3 for high‐performance supercapacitors developed by facile two‐step ALD process. Mater. Today Commun. 2017, 12, 55–62,  doi:10.1016/j.mtcomm.2017.06.006.  92. Tian, J.; Lin, B.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, X.; Yang, H. Porous WO 3 @CuO composites derived from polyoxometalates@metal organic  frameworks for supercapacitor. Mater. Lett. 2017, 206, 91–94, doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2017.06.116.  93. Zhuzhelskii, D.; Tolstopjatova, E.; Eliseeva, S.; Ivanov, A.; Miao, S.; Kondratiev, V. Electrochemical properties of PEDOT/WO3  composite  films  for  high  performance  supercapacitor  application.  Electrochim.  Acta  2019,  299,  182–190,  doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2019.01.007.  94. Das, A.K.; Paria, S.; Maitra, A.; Halder, L.; Bera, A.; Bera, R.; Si, S.K.; De, A.; Ojha, S.; Bera, S.; et al. Highly Rate Capable  Nanoflower‐like  NiSe  and  WO3@PPy  Composite  Electrode  Materials  toward  High  Energy  Density  Flexible  All‐Solid‐State  Asymmetric Supercapacitor. ACS Appl. Electron. Mater. 2019, 1, 977–990, doi:10.1021/acsaelm.9b00164.  95. Cong, S.; Tian, Y.; Li, Q.; Zhao, Z.; Geng, F. Single‐Crystalline Tungsten Oxide Quantum Dots for Fast Pseudocapacitor and  Electrochromic Applications. Adv. Mater. 2014, 26, 4260–4267, doi:10.1002/adma.201400447.  96. Huang, Y.; Li, Y.; Zhang, G.; Liu, W.; Li, D.; Chen, R.; Zheng, F.; Ni, H. Simple synthesis of 1D, 2D and 3D WO3 nanostructures  on  stainless  steel  substrate  for  high‐performance  supercapacitors.  J.  Alloys  Compd.  2019,  778,  603–611,  doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2018.11.212.  97. Yoon, S.; Jo, C.; Noh, S.Y.; Lee, C.W.; Song, J.H.; Lee, J. Development of a high‐performance anode for lithium‐ion batteries  using novel ordered mesoporous tungsten oxide materials with high electrical conductivity. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2011, 13,  11060–11066, doi:10.1039/c1cp20940j.  98. Cui, Y.; Xiao, K.; Bedford, N.M.; Lu, X.; Yun, J.; Amal, R.; Wang, D. Refilling Nitrogen to Oxygen Vacancies in Ultrafine Tungsten  Oxide Clusters for Superior Lithium Storage. Adv. Energy Mater. 2019, 9, 1–9, doi:10.1002/aenm.201902148.  99. Inamdar, A.I.; Chavan, H.; Ahmed, A.T.A.; Cho, S.; Kim, J.; Jo, Y.; Pawar, S.M.; Park, Y.; Kim, H.; Im, H. Nanograin tungsten  oxide with excess oxygen as a highly reversible anode material for high‐performance Li‐ion batteries. Mater. Lett. 2018, 215, 233– 237, doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2017.12.109.  100. Lim, Y. R.; Ko, Y.; Park, J.; Cho, W.I.; Lim, S.A.; Cha, E. Morphology‐controlled WO3 and WS2 nanocrystals for improved cycling  perfor‐mance of lithium ion batteries. J. Electrochem. Sci. Technol. 2019, 10, 89–97, doi:10.5229/JECST.2019.10.1.89.  101. Yang, J.;Xu, L.; Yan, S.; Zheng, W. Formation of tungsten trioxide with hierarchical architectures arranged by tiny nanorods for  lithium‐ion batteries. RSC Adv. 2016, 6, 18071–18076, doi:10.1039/C5RA26645A.  102. Sasidharan, M.; Gunawardhana, N.; Yoshio, M.; Nakashima, K. WO3 hollow nanospheres for high‐lithium storage capacity and  good cyclability. Nano Energy 2012, 1, 503–508, doi:10.1016/j.nanoen.2012.03.003.  103. Zeng, F.; Ren, Y.; Chen, L.; Yang, Y.; Li, Q.; Gu, G. Hierarchical sandwich‐type tungsten trioxide nanoplatelets/graphene anode  for  high‐performance  lithium‐ion  batteries  with  long  cycle  life.  Electrochim.  Acta  2016,  190,  964–971,  doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2015.12.109.  104. Kim, D.‐M.; Kim, S.‐J.; Lee, Y.‐W.; Kwak, D.‐H.; Park, H.‐C.; Kim, M.‐C.; Hwang, B.‐M.; Lee, S.; Choi, J.‐H.; Hong, S.; et al. Two‐ dimensional nanocomposites based on tungsten oxide nanoplates and graphene nanosheets for high‐performance lithium‐ion  batteries. Electrochim. Acta 2015, 163, 132–139, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2015.02.121.  105. Gu, X.; Wu, F.; Lei, B.; Wang, J.; Chen, Z.; Xie, K.; Song, Y.; Sun, D.; Sun, L.; Zhou, H.; et al. Three‐dimensional nitrogen‐doped  graphene frameworks anchored with bamboo‐like tungsten oxide nanorods as high performance anode materials for lithium  ion batteries. J. Power Sources 2016, 320, 231–238, doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2016.04.103.  ‐step hydrothermal  106. Dang, W.; Wang, W.; Yang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Huang, J.; Fang, X.; Wu, L.; Rong, Z.; Chen, X.; Li, X.; et al. One synthesis  of  2D  WO3  nanoplates@  graphene  nanocomposite  with  superior  anode  performance  for  lithium‐ion  battery.  Electrochim. Acta 2019, 313, 99–108, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2019.04.184.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  39  of  42  107. Huang, Y.; Lu, R.; Wang, M.; Sakamoto, J.; Poudeu, P.F. Hexagonal‐WO3 nanorods encapsulated in nitrogen and sulfur co‐ doped reduced graphene oxide as a high‐performance anode material for lithium ion batteries. J. Solid State Chem. 2020, 282,  121068, doi:10.1016/j.jssc.2019.121068.  108. Park,  S.K.;  Lee,  H.J.;  Lee,  M.H.;  Park,  H.S.  Hierarchically  structured  reduced  graphene  oxide/WO3  frameworks  for  an  application into lithium‐ion battery anodes. Chem. Eng. J. 2015, 281, 724–729, doi:10.1016/j.cej.2015.07.009.  109. Wang, C.; Zhao, Y.; Zhou, L.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, W.; Zhao, Z.; Hozzein, W.N.; Alharbi, H.M.S.; Li, W.; Zhao, D. Mesoporous carbon  matrix confinement synthesis of ultrasmall WO3 nanocrystals for lithium‐ion batteries. J. Mater. Chem. A 2018, 6, 21550–21557,  doi:10.1039/c8ta07145d.  110. Yoon, S.; Woo, S.‐G.; Jung, K.‐N.; Song, H. Conductive surface modification of cauliflower‐like WO3 and its electrochemical  properties for lithium‐ion batteries. J. Alloys Compd. 2014, 613, 187–192, doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2014.06.010.  111. Herdt, T.; Deckenbach, D.; Bruns, M.; Schneider, J.J. Tungsten oxide nanorod architectures as 3D anodes in binder‐free lithium‐ ion batteries. Nanoscale 2018, 11, 598–610, doi:10.1039/c8nr07636g.  112. Liu, Z.; Li, P.; Wan, Q.; Zhang, D.; Volinsky, A.A.; Qu, X. Low‐temperature combustion synthesis of hexagonal WO3∙0.33H2O@C  as anode material for lithium‐ion batteries. J. Alloys Compd. 2017, 701, 215–221, doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2017.01.089.  113. Bao, K.; Mao, W.; Liu, G.; Ye, L.; Xie, H.; Ji, S.; Wang, D.; Chen, C.; Li, Y. Preparation and electrochemical characterization of  ultrathin WO3−x /C nanosheets as anode materials in lithium‐ion batteries. Nano Res. 2016, 10, 1903–1911, doi:10.1007/s12274‐ 016‐1373‐6.  114. Aguir, K.; Lemire, C.; Lollman, D. Electrical properties of reactively sputtered WO3 thin films as ozone gas sensor. Sensors  Actuators B Chem. 2002, 84, 1–5, doi:10.1016/s0925‐4005(02)00003‐5.  115. Sun, Y.; Wang, W.; Qin, J.; Zhao, D.; Mao, B.; Xiao, Y.; Cao, M. Oxygen vacancy‐rich mesoporous W18O49 nanobelts with  ultrahigh  initial  Coulombic  efficiency  toward  high‐performance  lithium  storage.  Electrochim.  Acta  2016,  187,  329–339,  doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2015.11.064.  116. Li, W.; Sasaki, A.; Oozu, H.; Aoki, K.; Kakushima, K.; Kataoka, Y.; Nishiyama, A.; Sugii, N.; Wakabayashi, H.; Tsutsui, K.; et al.  Improvement of charge/discharge performance for lithium‐ion batteries with tungsten trioxide electrodes. Microelectron. Reliab.  2015, 55, 402–406, doi:10.1016/j.microrel.2014.11.002.  117. Pumera, M. Graphene‐based nanomaterials for energy storage. Energy Environ. Sci. 2010, 4, 668–674, doi:10.1039/c0ee00295j.  118. Ghosh  T.;  Oh,  W.  Review  on  Reduced  Graphene  Oxide  by  Chemical  Exfoliation  Method  and  its  Simpler  Alternative  of  Ultrasonication and Heat Treatment Method for Obtaining Graphene. J. Photocatal. Sci. 2012, 3, 17–23.  119. Liang, C.; Li, Z.; Dai, S. Mesoporous Carbon Materials: Synthesis and Modification. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2008, 47, 3696–3717,  doi:10.1002/anie.200702046.  120. Kim, H.‐S.; Ryu, J.H.; Kim, J.; Hwang, K.; Kang, H.; Oh, S.M.; Son, H.; Yoon, S. Ordered mesoporous tungsten oxide–carbon  nanocomposite for use as a highly reversible negative electrode in lithium‐ion batteries. J. Alloys. Compd. 2020, 832, 154816,  doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2020.154816.  121. Khoo, E.; Lee, P.S.; Ma, J. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of WO3 nanorods for electrochromic application. J. Eur. Ceram. Soc.  2010, 30, 1139–1144, doi:10.1016/j.jeurceramsoc.2009.05.014.  122. Kondalkar,  V.V.;  Kharade,  R.R.;  Mali,  S.S.;  Mane,  R.;  Patil,  P.;  Choudhury,  S.;  Bhosale,  P.  Nanobrick‐like  WO3  thin  films:  Hydrothermal  synthesis  and  electrochromic  application.  Superlattices  Microstruct.  2014,  73,  290–295,  doi:10.1016/j.spmi.2014.05.039.  123. Bhosale,  N.Y.;  Mali,  S.S.;  Hong,  C.K.;  Kadam,  A.V.  Hydrothermal  synthesis  of  WO3  nanoflowers  on  etched ITO and  their  electrochromic properties. Electrochim. Acta 2017, 246, 1112–1120, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2017.06.142.  124. Yao, Y.; Zhao, Q.; Wei, W.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, Y.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, Z.; Gao, Y. WO3 quantum‐dots electrochromism. Nano Energy  2020, 68, 104350, doi:10.1016/j.nanoen.2019.104350.  125. Zhang, J.; Tu, J.‐P.; Xia, X.‐H.; Wang, X.‐L.; Gu, C.‐D. Hydrothermally synthesized WO3 nanowire arrays with highly improved  electrochromic performance. J. Mater. Chem. 2011, 21, 5492–5498, doi:10.1039/c0jm04361c.  126. Zhou, J.; Wei, Y.; Luo, G.; Zheng, J.; Xu, C. Electrochromic properties of vertically aligned Ni‐doped WO3 nanostructure films  and their application in complementary electrochromic devices. J. Mater. Chem. C 2016, 4, 1613–1622, doi:10.1039/c5tc03750f.  127. Chang, X.; Sun, S.; Li, Z.; Xu, X.; Qiu, Y. Assembly of tungsten oxide nanobundles and their electrochromic properties. Appl.  Surf. Sci. 2011, 257, 5726–5730, doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2011.01.085.  128. Azam,  A.;  Kim,  J.;  Park,  J.;  Novak,  T.G.;  Tiwari,  A.P.;  Song,  S.H.;  Kim,  B.;  Jeon,  S.  Two‐Dimensional  WO3  Nanosheets  Chemically  Converted  from  Layered  WS2  for  High‐Performance  Electrochromic  Devices.  Nano  Lett.  2018,  18,  5646–5651,  doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.8b02150.  129. Zhang, J.; Wang, X.; Xia, X.; Gu, C.; Tu, J. Electrochromic behavior of WO3 nanotree films prepared by hydrothermal oxidation.  Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 2011, 95, 2107–2112, doi:10.1016/j.solmat.2011.03.008.  130. Li, Y.; McMaster, W.A.; Wei, H.; Chen, D.; Caruso, R.A. Enhanced Electrochromic Properties of WO3Nanotree‐like Structures  Synthesized via a Two‐Step Solvothermal Process Showing Promise for Electrochromic Window Application. ACS Appl. Nano  Mater. 2018, 1, 2552–2558, doi:10.1021/acsanm.8b00190.  131. Jiao, Z.; Wang, J.; Ke, L.; Liu, X.; Demir, H.V.; Yang, M.F.; Sun, X.W. Electrochromic properties of nanostructured tungsten  trioxide (hydrate) films and their applications in a complementary electrochromic device. Electrochim. Acta 2012, 63, 153–160,  doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2011.12.069.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  40  of  42  132. Peng, M.‐D.; Zhang, Y.‐Z.; Song, L.‐X.; Wu, L.‐N.; Hu, X.‐F.; Zhang, Y.‐L. Electrochemical stability properties of titanium‐doped  WO3 electrochromic thin films. Surf. Eng. 2016, 33, 305–309, doi:10.1080/02670844.2016.1255405.  133. Koo, B.‐R.; Kim, K.‐H.; Ahn, H.‐J. Switching electrochromic performance improvement enabled by highly developed mesopores  and oxygen vacancy defects of Fe‐doped WO3 films. Appl. Surf. Sci. 2018, 453, 238–244, doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2018.05.094.  134. Lee, C.‐T.; Chiang, D.; Chiu, P.‐K.; Chang, C.‐M.; Jaing, C.‐C.; Ou, S.‐L.; Kao, K.‐S. WO3 Electrochromic Thin Films Doped with  Carbon. IEEE Trans. Magn. 2014, 50, 1–4, doi:10.1109/tmag.2013.2294867.  135. Atak, G.; Pehlivan, I.B.; Montero, J.; Primetzhofer, D.; Granqvist, C.G.; Niklasson, G.A. Electrochromism of nitrogen‐doped  tungsten oxide thin films. Mater. Today Proc. 2020, 33, 2434–2439, doi:10.1016/j.matpr.2020.01.332.  136. Bon‐Ryul, K.; Kim, K.‐H.; Ahn, H.‐J. Novel tunneled phosphorus‐doped WO3 films achieved using ignited red phosphorus for  stable and fast switching electrochromic performances. Nanoscale 2019, 11, 3318–3325, doi:10.1039/c8nr08793h.  137. Li, Z.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y. Optical and electrochemical properties of Ni doped WO 3 ‐MoO 3 films prepared by sol‐gel process.  Proc. SPIE 2007, 6722, 1–5, doi: 10.1117/12.783686.  138. De León, J.O.‐R.; Acosta, D.; Pal, U.; Castañeda, L. Improving electrochromic behavior of spray pyrolised WO3 thin solid films  by Mo doping. Electrochim. Acta 2011, 56, 2599–2605, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2010.11.038.  139. Madhavi,  V.;  Kumar,  P.J.;  Kondaiah,  P.;  Hussain,  O.M.;  Uthanna,  S.  Effect  of  molybdenum  doping  on  the  electrochromic  properties of tungsten oxide thin films by RF magnetron sputtering. Ionics 2014, 20, 1737–1745, doi:10.1007/s11581‐014‐1073‐8.  140. Shen,  K.;  Sheng,  K.;  Wang,  Z.;  Zheng,  J.;  Xu,  C.  Cobalt  ions  doped  tungsten  oxide  nanowires  achieved  vertically  aligned  nanostructure with enhanced electrochromic properties. Appl. Surf. Sci. 2020, 501, 144003, doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2019.144003.  141. Mukherjee, R.; Sahay, P. Improved electrochromic performance in sprayed WO 3 thin films upon Sb doping. J. Alloys Compd.  2016, 660, 336–341, doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2015.11.138.  142. Najafi‐Ashtiani, H.; Bahari, A.; Gholipour, S. Investigation of coloration efficiency for tungsten oxide–silver nanocomposite thin  films with different surface morphologies. J. Mater. Sci. Mater. Electron. 2018, 29, 5820–5829, doi:10.1007/s10854‐018‐8554‐x.  143. Alsawafta, M.; Golestani, Y.M.; Phonemac, T.; Badilescu, S.; Stancovski, V.; Truong, V.‐V. Electrochromic Properties of Sol‐Gel  Synthesized  Macroporous  Tungsten  Oxide  Films  Doped  with  Gold  Nanoparticles.  J.  Electrochem.  Soc.  2014,  161,  276–283,  doi:10.1149/2.012405jes.  144. Yin, Y.; Lan, C.; Hu, S.; Li, C. Effect of Gd‐doping on electrochromic properties of sputter deposited WO3 films. J. Alloys Compd.  2018, 739, 623–631, doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2017.12.290.  145. Shen, L.; Zheng, J.; Xu, C. Enhanced electrochromic switches and tunable green fluorescence based on terbium ion doped WO3  films. Nanoscale 2019, 11, 23049–23057, doi:10.1039/c9nr06125h.  146. Zhang, G.; Lu, K.; Zhang, X.; Yuan, W.; Ning, H.; Tao, R.; Liu, X.; Yao, R.; Peng, J. Enhanced Transmittance Modulation of SiO2‐ Doped  Crystalline  WO3  Films  Prepared  from  a  Polyethylene  Oxide  (PEO)  Template.  Coatings  2018,  8,  228,  doi:10.3390/coatings8070228.  147. Han, J.; Ko, K.‐W.; Sarwar, S.; Lee, M.‐S.; Park, S.; Hong, S.; Han, C.‐H. Enhanced electrochromic properties of TiO2 nanocrystal  embedded amorphous WO3 films. Electrochim. Acta 2018, 278, 396–404, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2018.05.026.  148. Meenakshi,  M.;  Gowthami,  V.;  Perumal,  P.;  Sivakumar,  R.;  Sanjeeviraja,  C.  Influence  of  Dopant  Concentration  on  the  Electrochromic Properties of Tungsten Oxide Thin Films. Electrochim. Acta 2015, 174, 302–314, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2015.05.187.  149. Ding, J.; Liu, Z.; Wei, A.; Chen, T.; Zhang, H. Study of electrochromic characteristics in the near‐infrared region of electrochromic  devices  based  on  solution‐processed  amorphous  WO3  films.  Mater.  Sci.  Semicond.  Process.  2018,  88,  73–78,  doi:10.1016/j.mssp.2018.07.034.  150. Chang‐Jian, C.‐W.; Cho, E.‐C.; Yen, S.‐C.; Ho, B.‐C.; Lee, K.‐C.; Huang, J.‐H.; Hsiao, Y.‐S. Facile preparation of WO 3 /PEDOT:PSS  composite for inkjet printed electrochromic window and its performance for heat shielding. Dye. Pigment. 2018, 148, 465–473,  doi:10.1016/j.dyepig.2017.09.026.  151. Li, G.; Wu, G.; Guo, C.; Wang, B. Fabrication of one‐dimensional W18O49 nanomaterial for the near infrared shielding. Mater.  Lett. 2016, 169, 227–230, doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2016.01.094.  152. Yang, L.; Ge, D.; Zhao, J.; Ding, Y.; Kong, X.; Li, Y. Improved electrochromic performance of ordered macroporous tungsten  oxide films for IR electrochromic device. Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 2012, 100, 251–257, doi:10.1016/j.solmat.2012.01.028.  153. Nguyen, T.D.; Yeo, L.P.; Kei, T.C.; Mandler, D.; Magdassi, S.; Tok, A.I.Y. Efficient Near Infrared Modulation with High Visible  Transparency  Using  SnO  2  –WO  3  Nanostructure  for  Advanced  Smart  Windows.  Adv.  Opt.  Mater.  2019,  7,  1–10,  doi:10.1002/adom.201801389.  154. Ling, H.; Yeo, L.P.; Wang, Z.; Li, X.; Mandler, D.; Magdassi, S.; Tok, A.I.Y. TiO2–WO3 core–shell inverse opal structure with  enhanced electrochromic performance in NIR region. J. Mater. Chem. C 2018, 6, 8488–8494, doi:10.1039/c8tc01954a.  155. Zhang, S.; Cao, S.; Zhang, T.; Yao, Q.; Fisher, A.C.; Lee, J.Y. Monoclinic oxygen‐deficient tungsten oxide nanowires for dynamic  and independent control of near‐infrared and visible light transmittance. Mater. Horiz. 2018, 5, 291–297, doi:10.1039/c7mh01128h.  156. Costa,  C.;  Pinheiro,  C.;  Henriques,  I.;  Laia,  C.A.T.  Inkjet  Printing  of  Sol–Gel  Synthesized  Hydrated  Tungsten  Oxide  Nanoparticles for Flexible Electrochromic Devices. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2012, 4, 1330–1340, doi:10.1021/am201606m.  157. Pan, J.; Zheng, R.; Wang, Y.; Ye, X.; Wan, Z.; Jia, C.; Weng, X.; Xie, J.; Deng, L. A high‐performance electrochromic device  assembled  with  hexagonal  WO3  and  NiO/PB  composite  nanosheet  electrodes  towards  energy  storage  smart  window.  Sol.  Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 2020, 207, 110337, doi:10.1016/j.solmat.2019.110337.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  41  of  42  158. Guo,  Q.;  Zhao,  X.;  Li,  Z.;  Wang,  B.;  Wang,  D.;  Nie,  G.  High  Performance  Multicolor  Intelligent  Supercapacitor  and  Its  Quantitative Monitoring of Energy Storage Level by Electrochromic Parameters. ACS Appl. Energy Mater. 2020, 3, 2727–2736,  doi:10.1021/acsaem.9b02392.  159. Zhang, X.; Tian, Y.; Li, W.; Dou, S.; Wang, L.; Qu, H.; Zhao, J.; Li, Y. Preparation and performances of all‐solid‐state variable  infrared emittance devices based on amorphous and crystalline WO3 electrochromic thin film. Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 2019,  200, 109916, doi: 10.1016/j.solmat.2019.109916.  160. Cho, S.I.; Lee, S.B. Fast Electrochemistry of Conductive Polymer Nanotubes: Synthesis, Mechanism, and Application. Accounts  Chem. Res. 2008, 41, 699–707, doi:10.1021/ar7002094.  161. Wang, W.‐Q.; Wang, X.‐L.; Xia, X.‐H.; Yao, Z.‐J.; Zhong, Y.; Tu, J.‐P. Enhanced electrochromic and energy storage performance  in  mesoporous  WO3  film  and  its  application  in  a  bi‐functional  smart  window.  Nanoscale  2018,  10,  8162–8169,  doi:10.1039/c8nr00790j.  162. Xie, S.; Bi, Z.; Chen, Y.; He, X.; Guo, X.; Gao, X.; Li, X. Electrodeposited Mo‐doped WO3 film with large optical modulation and  high  areal  capacitance  toward  electrochromic  energy‐storage  applications.  Appl.  Surf.  Sci.  2018,  459,  774–781,  doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2018.08.045.  163. Cai, G.; Wang, X.; Cui, M.; Darmawan, P.; Wang, J.; Eh, A.L.‐S.; Lee, P.S. Electrochromo‐supercapacitor based on direct growth  of NiO nanoparticles. Nano Energy 2015, 12, 258–267, doi:10.1016/j.nanoen.2014.12.031.  164. Wei, D.; Scherer, M.R.J.; Bower, C.; Andrew, P.; Ryhänen, T.; Steiner, U. A Nanostructured Electrochromic Supercapacitor. Nano  Lett. 2012, 12, 1857–1862, doi:10.1021/nl2042112.  165. Wang, K.; Wu, H.; Meng, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Wei, Z. Integrated energy storage and electrochromic function in one flexible device:  An energy storage smart window. Energy Environ. Sci. 2012, 5, 8384–8389, doi:10.1039/c2ee21643d.  166. Xia,  X.;  Ku,  Z.;  Zhou,  D.;  Zhong,  Y.;  Zhang,  Y.;  Wang,  Y.;  Huang,  M.J.;  Tu,  J.;  Fan,  H.J.  Perovskite  solar  cell  powered  electrochromic batteries for smart windows. Mater. Horiz. 2016, 3, 588–595, doi:10.1039/c6mh00159a.  167. He, X.; Li, X.; Bi, Z.; Chen, Y.; Xu, X.; Gao, X. Dual‐functional electrochromic and energy‐storage electrodes based on tungsten  trioxide nanostructures. J. Solid State Electrochem. 2018, 22, 2579–2586, doi:10.1007/s10008‐018‐3959‐2.  168. Bi, Z.; Li, X.; He, X.; Chen, Y.; Xu, X.; Gao, X. Integrated electrochromism and energy storage applications based on tungsten  trioxide monohydrate nanosheets by novel one‐step low temperature synthesis. Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 2018, 183, 59–65,  doi:10.1016/j.solmat.2018.04.001.  169. Inamdar, A.I.; Kim, J.; Jo, Y.; Woo, H.; Cho, S.; Pawar, S.M.; Lee, S.; Gunjakar, J.L.; Cho, Y.; Hou, B.; et al. Highly efficient electro‐ optically tunable smart‐supercapacitors using an oxygen‐excess nanograin tungsten oxide thin film. Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells  2017, 166, 78–85, doi:10.1016/j.solmat.2017.03.006.  170. Wang,  W.;  Yao,  Z.;  Wang,  X.;  Xia,  X.;  Gu,  C.;  Tu,  J.  Niobium  doped  tungsten  oxide  mesoporous  film  with  enhanced  electrochromic  and  electrochemical  energy  storage  properties.  J.  Colloid  Interface  Sci.  2019,  535,  300–307,  doi:10.1016/j.jcis.2018.10.006.  171. Zhou,  D.;  Shi,  F.;  Xie,  D.;  Wang,  D.;  Xia,  X.;  Wang,  X.;  Gu,  C.;  Tu,  J.  Bi‐functional  Mo‐doped  WO  3  nanowire  array  electrochromism‐plus electrochemical energy storage. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 2016, 465, 112–120, doi:10.1016/j.jcis.2015.11.068.  172. Wei, H.; Yan, X.; Wu, S.; Luo, Z.; Wei, S.; Guo, Z. Electropolymerized Polyaniline Stabilized Tungsten Oxide Nanocomposite  Films:  Electrochromic  Behavior  and  Electrochemical  Energy  Storage.  J.  Phys.  Chem.  C  2012,  116,  25052–25064,  doi:10.1021/jp3090777.  173. Nwanya, A.C.; Jafta, C.J.; Ejikeme, P.M.; Ugwuoke, P.E.; Reddy, M.; Osuji, R.U.; Ozoemena, K.I.; Ezema, F.I. Electrochromic and  electrochemical capacitive properties of tungsten oxide and its polyaniline nanocomposite films obtained by chemical bath  deposition method. Electrochim. Acta 2014, 128, 218–225, doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2013.10.002.  174. Zhang, K.; Li, N.; Wang, Y.; Ma, X.; Zhao, J.; Qiang, L.; Hou, S.; Ji, J.; Li, Y. Bifunctional urchin‐like WO3@PANI electrodes for  superior  electrochromic  behavior  and  lithium‐ion  battery.  J.  Mater.  Sci.  Mater.  Electron.  2018,  29,  14803–14812,  doi:10.1007/s10854‐018‐9617‐8.  175. Guo, Q.; Zhao, X.; Li, Z.; Wang, D.; Nie, G. A novel solid‐state electrochromic supercapacitor with high energy storage capacity  and cycle stability based on poly(5‐formylindole)/WO3 honeycombed porous nanocomposites. Chem. Eng. J. 2020, 384, 123370,  doi:10.1016/j.cej.2019.123370.  176. Zhang, J.; Tu, J.‐P.; Zhang, D.; Qiao, Y.‐Q.; Xia, X.‐H.; Wang, X.‐L.; Gu, C.‐D. Multicolor electrochromic polyaniline–WO3 hybrid  thin films: One‐pot molecular assembling synthesis. J. Mater. Chem. 2011, 21, 17316–17324, doi:10.1039/c1jm13069b.  177. Cai,  G.;  Darmawan,  P.;  Cui,  M.;  Wang,  J.;  Chen,  J.;  Magdassi,  S.;  Lee,  P.S.  Highly  Stable  Transparent  Conductive  Silver  Grid/PEDOT:PSS Electrodes for Integrated Bifunctional Flexible Electrochromic Supercapacitors. Adv. Energy Mater. 2016, 6, 1– 8, doi:10.1002/aenm.201501882.  178. Sun, P.; Liu, Y.; Qiu, M.; Tong, Y.; Mai, W. In Situ Monitoring Small Energy Storage Change of Electrochromic Supercapacitors  via Perovskite Photodetectors. Small Methods 2020, 4, 1–6, doi:10.1002/smtd.201900731.  179. Yang,  P.;  Sun,  P.;  Mai,  W.  Electrochromic  energy  storage  devices.  Mater.  Today  2016,  19,  394–402,  doi:10.1016/j.mattod.2015.11.007.  180. Cai,  G.;  Wang,  J.;  Lee,  P.S.  Next‐Generation  Multifunctional  Electrochromic  Devices.  Acc.  Chem.  Res.  2016,  49,  1469–1476,  doi:10.1021/acs.accounts.6b00183.  181. Cai, G.; Darmawan, P.; Cheng, X.; Lee, P.S. Inkjet Printed Large Area Multifunctional Smart Windows. Adv. Energy Mater. 2017,  7, doi:10.1002/aenm.201602598.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  42  of  42  182. Deb, S.K. Opportunities and challenges in science and technology of WO3 for electrochromic and related applications. Sol.  Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 2008, 92, 245–258, doi:10.1016/j.solmat.2007.01.026.  183. Bi,  Z.;  Li,  X.;  Chen,  Y.;  Xu,  X.;  Zhang,  S.;  Zhu,  Q.  Bi‐functional  flexible  electrodes  based  on  tungsten  trioxide/zinc  oxide  nanocomposites  for  electrochromic  and  energy  storage  applications.  Electrochimica  Acta  2017,  227,  61–68,  doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2017.01.003.  184. Xu,  Z.;  Li,  W.;  Huang,  J.;  Guo,  X.;  Liu,  Q.;  Yu,  R.;  Miao,  W.;  Zhou,  B.;  Guo,  W.;  Liu,  X.  Flexible,  controllable  and  angle‐ independent  photoelectrochromic  display  enabled  by  smart  sunlight  management.  Nano  Energy  2019,  63,  103830,  doi:10.1016/j.nanoen.2019.06.026.  185. Wang, Z.; Chiu, H.; Paolella, A.; Zaghib, K.; Demopoulos, G.P. Lithium Photo‐intercalation of CdS‐Sensitized WO 3 Anode for  Energy Storage and Photoelectrochromic Applications. ChemSusChem 2019, 12, 2220–2230, doi:10.1002/cssc.201803061.  186. Xie, Z.; Jin, X.; Chen, G.; Xu, J.; Chen, D.; Shen, G. Integrated smart electrochromic windows for energy saving and storage  applications. Chem. Commun. 2014, 50, 608–610, doi:10.1039/c3cc47950a.  187. Chang, X.; Hu, R.; Sun, S.; Liu, J.; Lei, Y.; Liu, T.; Dong, L.; Yin, Y. Sunlight‐charged electrochromic battery based on hybrid film  of tungsten oxide and polyaniline. Appl. Surf. Sci. 2018, 441, 105–112, doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2018.02.003.  188. Yun, T.G.; Kim, D.; Kim, Y.H.; Park, M.; Hyun, S.; Han, S.M. Photoresponsive Smart Coloration Electrochromic Supercapacitor.  Adv. Mater. 2017, 29, 1–10, doi:10.1002/adma.201606728.  189. Wei,  J.;  Jiao,  X.;  Wang,  T.;  Chen,  D.  The  fast  and  reversible  intrinsic  photochromic  response  of  hydrated  tungsten  oxide  nanosheets. J. Mater. Chem. C 2015, 3, 7597–7603, doi:10.1039/c5tc01350j.  190. Zhang, Q.; Wang, R.; Lu, Y.; Wu, Y.; Yuan, J.; Liu, J. Highly Efficient Photochromic Tungsten Oxide@PNIPAM Composite  Spheres with a Fast Response. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2021, 13, 4220–4229, doi:10.1021/acsami.0c20817.  191. Wang, S.; Fan, W.; Liu, Z.; Yu, A.; Jiang, X. Advances on tungsten oxide based photochromic materials: Strategies to improve  their photochromic properties. J. Mater. Chem. C 2018, 6, 191–212, doi:10.1039/c7tc04189f.  192. Bignozzi, C.A.; Caramori, S.; Cristino, V.; Argazzi, R.; Meda, L.; Tacca, A. Nanostructured photoelectrodes based on WO3:  Applications to photooxidation of aqueous electrolytes. Chem. Soc. Rev. 2013, 42, 2228–2246, doi:10.1039/c2cs35373c.  193. Jin, J.; Yu, J.; Guo, D.; Cui, C.; Ho, W. A Hierarchical Z‐Scheme CdS‐WO3Photocatalyst with Enhanced CO2Reduction Activity.  Small 2015, 11, 5262–5271, doi:10.1002/smll.201500926.  194. Balayeva,  N.O.;  Fleisch,  M.;  Bahnemann,  D.W.  Surface‐grafted  WO3/TiO2  photocatalysts:  Enhanced  visible‐light  activity  towards indoor air purification. Catal. Today 2018, 313, 63–71, doi:10.1016/j.cattod.2017.12.008.  195. Fu, J.; Xu, Q.; Low, J.; Jiang, C.; Yu, J. Ultrathin 2D/2D WO3/g‐C3N4 step‐scheme H2‐production photocatalyst. Appl. Catal. B  Environ. 2019, 243, 556–565, doi:10.1016/j.apcatb.2018.11.011.  196. Palmas,  S.;  Castresana,  P.A.;  Mais,  L.;  Vacca,  A.;  Mascia,  M.;  Ricci,  P.C.  TiO2–WO3  nanostructured  systems  for  photoelectrochemical applications. RSC Adv. 2016, 6, 101671–101682, doi:10.1039/c6ra18649a.  197. Castro,  I.;  Byzynski,  G.;  Dawson,  M.;  Ribeiro,  C.  Charge  transfer  mechanism  of  WO  3  /TiO  2  heterostructure  for  photoelectrochemical water splitting. J. Photochem. Photobiol. A Chem. 2017, 339, 95–102, doi:10.1016/j.jphotochem.2017.02.024.  198. Li, Y.; Zhou, X.; Luo, W.; Cheng, X.; Zhu, Y.; El‐Toni, A.M.; Khan, A.; Deng, Y.; Zhao, D. Pore Engineering of Mesoporous  Tungsten Oxides for Ultrasensitive Gas Sensing. Adv. Mater. Interfaces 2018, 6, 1–9, doi:10.1002/admi.201801269.  199. Ji, H.; Zeng, W.; Xu, Y.; Li, Y. Nanosheet‐assembled hierarchical WO3 flower‐like nanostructures: Hydrothermal synthesis and  NH3‐sensing properties. Mater. Lett. 2019, 250, 155–158, doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2019.05.023.  200. Evecan, D.; Zayim, E. Özkan Highly uniform electrochromic tungsten oxide thin films deposited by e‐beam evaporation for  energy saving systems. Curr. Appl. Phys. 2019, 19, 198–203, doi:10.1016/j.cap.2018.12.006.  201. Wang, C.; Sun, R.; Li, X.; Sun, Y.; Sun, P.; Liu, F.; Lu, G. Hierarchical flower‐like WO3 nanostructures and their gas sensing  properties. Sensors Actuators B Chem. 2014, 204, 224–230, doi:10.1016/j.snb.2014.07.083.  202. Zeng, W.; Li, Y.; Miao, B.; Pan, K. Hydrothermal synthesis and gas sensing properties of WO3H2O with different morphologies.  Phys. E Low‐Dimens. Syst. Nano Struct. 2014, 56, 183–188, doi:10.1016/j.physe.2013.09.005.  203. Liang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Zou, C.; Xu, K.; Luo, X.; Luo, T.; Li, J.; Yang, Q.; Shi, P.; Yuan, C. 2D ultra‐thin WO3 nanosheets with  dominant  {002} crystal  facets for high‐performance xylene  sensing  and methyl  orange  photocatalytic  degradation.  J.  Alloys  Compd. 2019, 783, 848–854, doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2018.12.384.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nanomaterials Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Advances in Electrochemical Energy Devices Constructed with Tungsten Oxide-Based Nanomaterials

Nanomaterials , Volume 11 (3) – Mar 10, 2021

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/advances-in-electrochemical-energy-devices-constructed-with-tungsten-wpGYkwM8KI

References (205)

Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2021 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2079-4991
DOI
10.3390/nano11030692
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Review  Advances in Electrochemical Energy Devices Constructed with  Tungsten Oxide‐Based Nanomaterials  1,2 2, 1, Wenfang Han  , Qian Shi  * and Renzong Hu  *    Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials, School of Materials Science  and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China;  wenfang.han@foxmail.com    The Key Lab of Guangdong for Modern Surface Engineering Technology, National Engineering Laboratory  for Modern Materials Surface Engineering Technology, Institute of New Materials,   Guangdong Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510651, China  *  Correspondence: qianzixlf@163.com (Q.S.); msrenzonghu@scut.edu.cn (R.H.)  Abstract:  Tungsten  oxide‐based  materials  have  drawn  huge  attention  for  their  versatile  uses  to  construct various energy storage devices. Particularly, their electrochromic devices and optically‐ changing devices are intensively studied in terms of energy‐saving. Furthermore, based on close  connections in the forms of device structure and working mechanisms between these two main  applications, bifunctional devices of tungsten oxide‐based materials with energy storage and optical  change  came  into  our  view,  and  when  solar  cells  are  integrated,  multifunctional  devices  are  accessible.  In  this  article,  we  have  reviewed  the  latest  developments  of  tungsten  oxide‐based  nanostructured materials in various kinds of applications, and our focus falls on their energy‐related  uses, especially supercapacitors, lithium ion batteries, electrochromic devices, and their bifunctional  and  multifunctional  devices.  Additionally,  other  applications  such  as  photochromic  devices,  sensors, and photocatalysts of tungsten oxide‐based materials have also been mentioned. We hope  Citation: Han, W.; Shi, Q.; Hu, R.  this article can shed light on the related applications of tungsten oxide‐based materials and inspire  Advances in Electrochemical Energy  new possibilities for further uses.  Devices Constructed with Tungsten  Oxide‐Based Nanomaterials.   Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692.  Keywords:  tungsten  oxides;  energy  storage  devices;  electrochromic  devices;  multifunctional  https://doi.org/10.3390/  devices  nano11030692  Academic Editor: Byoung‐Suhk Kim  1. Introduction  Received: 10 February 2021  Energy  exhaustion  and  environment  deterioration  has  caused  more  and  more  Accepted: 4 March 2021  scientific and public concern. To slow down the speed of resources running out and to  Published: 10 March 2021  ameliorate our living condition, turning to other inexhaustible energies including solar,  wind,  and  tidal  energy  and  employing  high‐efficiency  devices  to  save  energy  have  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays  neutral with regard to jurisdictional  naturally  become  very  important.  Under  the  uncontrollable  weather  conditions,  it  is  claims in published maps and  obviously challenging to get reliable and stable energy supply merely from inexhaustible  institutional affiliations.  energies. Therefore, those energy converting systems have to be used in conjunction with  high‐efficiency energy storage devices to store the converted energy [1,2]. As is known to  us, supercapacitors [3,4] and lithium ion batteries [5] are two types of widely used efficient  energy storage devices (ESDs). Moreover, electrochromic devices (ECDs) [6–8] are a well‐ Copyright: © 2021 by the authors.  known high‐efficient application through controlling sunlight intensity and the amount  Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.  of heat crossing it by changing transmittance.   This article is an open access article  Supercapacitors  (SC)  are  one  promising  energy  storage  device  for  its  unique  distributed under the terms and  advantages like high power density, ultra‐long cycling life (over 10  times), fast charging  conditions of the Creative Commons  speed (within tens of seconds), and outstanding performance under low temperature [9].  Attribution (CC BY) license  There are two main types of SCs, electrical double‐layer capacitors and pseudo‐capacitors  (http://creativecommons.org/licenses [3]. The former works basing on the centralization and decentralization of charge at the  /by/4.0/).  Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030692  www.mdpi.com/journal/nanomaterials  Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  2  of  42  interface between electrode and electrolyte, while the latter operates mainly relying on  Faradic  reactions  with  their  double  layer  capacitance  making  a  relatively  small  contribution to total capacitance [10]. Typically, the capacitance of pseudo‐capacitors is  higher  than  that  of  electrical  double‐layer  capacitors  [11].  Lithium  ion  battery  (LIB)  is  universally  applied  in  portable  electronic  products  and  electric  vehicles  for  their  high  energy density [12]. Now, the typical anode material in LIBs is graphite owing to its low  cost, stable electrochemical properties, and good structural stability. Its theoretical specific  −1 capacity, 372 mA h g , however, is relatively low as energy consuming needs continually  expand, thus limiting the further use of LIBs. Transitional oxide materials, such as tin  oxides  [13],  cobalt  oxides  [14],  and  tungsten  oxides  [15]  are  considered  potential  alternatives to replace graphite owing to their higher specific capacity.   Electrochromic  (EC)  materials  can  change  their  optical  parameters  including  reflectance, refractive index, transmission, and emissivity when applied with a relatively  low voltage (even smaller than 1 V) or an electric field [7], and this process is reversible  when the polarity of the voltage or the electric field reverses. Because they possess this  special property, ECDs are welcomed in smart windows, anti‐dizziness rearview mirrors,  display applications, and aerospace and military fields [16]. In particular, because energy  consumption in buildings accounts for 40% of the global energy consumption [17], when  they are  used as  smart  windows, a  large amount  of  energy  can be  saved  due to their  adjustable transmittance of sunlight. It has also been reported [18] that EC smart windows  were superior to photovoltaic devices on energy savings. Moreover, in view of the fact  that the color changing processes of ECDs also relate to ion insertion and extraction, an  ECD can be considered as a transparent ESD.  The  above  three  kinds  of  devices  share  similar  device  structure  and  operating  principle. Furthermore, many transitional metal oxides, like MoO3 [19–21], MnO2 [22–24],  and WO3 [15,25], can perform as the electrode material in these devices. Among them,  tungsten  oxides  have  large  energy  storage  capacity  that  enable  it  to  function  as  an  electrode  in  ESDs,  including  SCs  and  LIBs,  and  it  is  also  the  most  widely  researched  material in the EC field. When used as the electrode in SC, because the valence of W can  −1 be changed between +2 and +6, its theoretical specific capacity is 1112 F g  [26], much  higher than the normally used  double‐layer capacitor’s carbon electrode  material, and  −1 when as the anode in LIB, its theoretical specific capacity is 693 mA h g , nearly double  that of graphite. In addition, they are also endowed with other advantages including high  density, low cost, environmental friendliness, and nontoxicity. As in the EC field, the first  EC phenomenon was found in tungsten oxide by Deb in the sixties [27]. Tungsten oxides  are preferred for their short switching time, impressive color change, and electrochemical  stability.  Considering  that  ESDs  and  ECDs  have  several  correlations,  tungsten  oxide  electrochromic  energy  storage  devices  [28,29],  whether  it  be  electrochromic  supercapacitors  (ECSCs)  or  electrochromic  batteries  (ECBs),  have  also  attracted  much  attention. We can get direct information about their working condition from color signals,  bringing us great convenience and safety, or we can see it as a transparent battery and  make good use of the energy stored in it, reducing electricity consumption. Moreover,  these bifunctional devices can have more possibilities by integrating other parts, such as  solar cells, so that self‐powered systems are achieved [30,31]. Further, it can output power  generated by the solar cells to effectively use the energy. In view of the versatile uses of  tungsten  oxide‐based  materials  (Figure  1),  there  are  many  studies  on  them  and  some  researchers have reviewed their developments in one or two specific fields, like R. Buch  [32] in electrochromic, Dong [33] in photocatalysts, and V. Hariharan [34] in sensors. Yet,  reviews focused on their comprehensive applications are still very rare. In this review,  firstly (Section 2), we give a comprehensive introduction of the structures and uses of  tungsten  oxides,  especially  in  energy  storage  devices,  including  tungsten  oxide‐based  SCs, LIBs and ECs. Basic mechanisms and improving methods about tungsten oxides‐ based  SCs  and  LIBs  have  been  discussed  (Section  3),  following  with  the  material  and    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  3  of  42  nanostructure  design  of  tungsten  oxides  for  EC  applications  (Sections  4  and  5).  Particularly, when used as an electrode in ECDs, their performances in near infrared (NIR)  areas  have  been  introduced.  Furthermore,  considering  several  connections  like  device  structures,  working  principles,  and  materials  involved,  between  ESDs  and  ECDs,  tungsten  oxide‐based  bifunctional  devices  are  included  in  this  part.  Moreover,  we  mentioned the integration of solar cells in those bifunctional devices (Section 6). Finally,  we  provide  a  simple  introduction  to  other  applications  including  photochromism,  photocatalyst, and gas sensors of tungsten oxide‐based materials (Section 7), ending with  a perspective on new functions and novel applications for smart, flexible, and especially  self‐powering tungsten oxide‐based devices.  Figure 1. Applications of tungsten oxide‐based materials for electronic devices.  2. Energy Storage Mechanism of Tungsten Oxides  2.1. The Crystal Structure of Tungsten Oxides  In  light  of  the  fact  that  tungsten  trioxide  (WO3)  is  the  most  widely  used  of  the  tungsten oxides, we will mainly concentrate on WO3‐based materials. The perfect WO3 is  a kind of ReO3 type cubic structured material in which octahedral WO6 links each other  by  corner‐sharing  [25].  In  a  WO6  octahedron,  the  W  atom  lies  at  the  center  and  the  remaining  six  O  atoms  form  the  octahedral  framework.  As  temperature  and  pressure  change, the WO6 octahedron will tilt and rotate at certain angles, leading to the formation  of  several  different  phases:  tetragonal  phase,  orthorhombic  phase,  monoclinic  phase,  triclinic phase, and cubic phase [35–37]. Figure 2a shows the phase transformation of WO3  as temperature changes. Within WO3, there are sites and tunnels between octahedrons so  + + + that atoms with small diameters such as H , Li , and K  can transfer into WO3 and be  3, hexagonal phase, that can be obtained from  stored. There is also another phase of WO the hydrate‐losing process of hydrated tungsten oxides [38]. As shown in Figure 2b,c, in  the  a‐b  plane  of  this  phase,  there  are  trigonal  cavities  and  hexagonal  windows.  After  stacking  of  the  WO6  octahedron,  trigonal  and  hexagonal  tunnels  along  the  c  axel  are    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  4  of  42  formed [39,40]. These tunnels are conducive to the fast transfer of ions and electrons so  the electrochemical activity of hexagonal tungsten oxides is better than the WO3 of other  phases. The most common phases of tungsten trioxide are monoclinic phase (m‐WO3),  hexagon phase (h‐WO3), and cubic phase (c‐WO3).  Figure  2.  (a)  Tilt  patterns  and  stability  temperature  domains  of  the  different  polymorphs  of  WO3.  Reproduced  with  permission from [41]. Copyright IUCr Journals, 2000. The structures of hexagon phase h‐WO3 shown along (b) [001] plane  and (c) [100] plane. Reproduced with permission from [40]. Copyright American Chemical Society, 2009.  Oxygen  deficiencies  are  very  common  in  the  naturally  existing  WO3,  causing  the  existence of substoichiometric tungsten oxides, WO3‐x (0 < x <1), in which the valence of  W  might  be  +3,  +4,  or  +5  [42].  Among  them,  W18O49,  W20O58,  and  W24O68  are  the  most  common and the oxygen deficiencies within them can promote their conductivity. This  characteristic renders WO3 an n‐type semiconductor whose electric conductivity can be  adjusted by controlling the amount of O vacancy in it [43–45].  Tungsten  oxides  made  from  liquid‐related  methods  are  often  hydrated  tungsten  oxides before heat treatment, WO3∙xH2O, mainly including WO3∙0.33H2O, WO3∙0.5H2O,  WO3∙H2O, and WO3∙2H2O. The structure of WO3∙xH2O is largely decided by the value of  x. For example, the structure of WO3∙H2O is that H2O lies in the gap between the layers of  WO6 octahedrons [46,47], and the structure of WO3∙2H2O is that in addition to the same  kind of H2O molecule in WO3∙H2O, another type of H2O molecule directly links to the  tungsten atom at the bottom or top of the octahedron [48]. This structure is good for easy  transport  of  ions  and  electrons,  especially  protons  by  means  of  the  hydrogen  bond    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  5  of  42  network within them. Usually, hydrated tungsten oxides have much better conductivity  than pure tungsten oxide, translating into enhanced electrochemical performance [47].   2.2. Phase Transformation in Tungsten Oxides Toward Energy Storage  As we mentioned above, SCs and LIBs are two typical ESDs, and ECDs can be seen  as ESDs too. Here, we give a rough introduction and comparison between their working  mechanisms  and  requirements  of  tungsten  oxide  electrodes.  Figure  3  depicts  their  similarities and differences in terms of structures and mechanisms. SCs consist of five  main parts, two electrodes, electrolyte, and current collectors at both electrodes (Figure  3a) [4]. As for pseudo‐capacitors, they mainly rely on fast Faradic reactions on the interface  between electrode and the electrolyte. Take WO3 as an example. When used as electrode  material for pseudo‐capacitors, WO3 works according to Equation (1) [49–51]:   + − WO3 + xM  + xe  = MxWO3  (1) where M can be H, Li, Na, K, and other atoms or groups with small volumes. Different  from  tungsten  oxides  with  other  phases,  h‐WO3,  except  for  this  Faradic  reaction,  has  another way of energy‐storage by placing atoms in tunnels and cavities within its inner  structure [52].  Figure 3. Structures and mechanisms of tungsten oxides working in (a) supercapacitor (SC), (b) lithium ion battery (LIB),  and (c) electrochromic device (ECD). (d) Physical image of the color changing process of WO3.  LIB also shares the five‐layer sandwich structure (Figure 3b). It works depending on  Li   ions’  movement  between  cathode  and  anode.  Compared  with  that  of  pseudo‐ capacitors, the time needed for the charging and discharging process of LIBs is usually  much longer because the redox reactions happen not only at the surface of the electrode  but also in its deep bulk. Crystalline WO3 follows the conversion mechanism when as  anode material in LIB, as presented in Equations (2) and (3) [15]. From the equations, we  −1 also get the theoretical capacity of WO3, 695mA h g , when every W atom accommodates  6 Li . Nevertheless, it is a double‐edged sword because tungsten oxides suffer from large  volume change at the same time, causing structural collapses and fast capacity decreases  during cycling. Additionally, their low conductivity results in poor rate performance. As  shown in Figure 4, the morphology and phase changes in the WO3 made by magnetron  sputtering after initially fully discharged (at 0.01 V) and charged (at 4.0 V) have also been  explored  by  scanning  electron  microscopy  (SEM)  and  transition  electron  microscopy  (TEM), revealing a large volume change of phase variation [15].     Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  6  of  42  +  − WO3 (crystalline) + 6Li + 6e      W+3Li2O (initial discharging cycle)  (2) +  − W + 3Li2O      WO3(nanocrystalline) + 6Li + 6e   (3) Figure 4. (a) Initial discharge and charge curves of WO3 thin film anode. (b) SEM image of as‐deposited WO3 thin film; (c)  SEM and (d) selected‐area diffraction (SAED) images of WO3 thin film after initially discharged to 0.01 V; (e) SEM and (f)  SAED images of WO3 thin film after first charged to 4.0 V. Adapted with permission from [15]. Copyright Elsevier, 2010.  Usually,  as  shown  in  Figure  3c,  to  assemble  a  classic  ECD,  five  components  are  needed, namely electrochromic layer, ion storage (IS) layer, counter electrode (CE) layer,  and two transparent conducting (TC) layers. When the EC layer is WO3, the CE layer is  usually  anode  EC  materials  such  as  nickel  oxide  [53,54],  manganese  dioxide  [55],  vanadium  pentoxide  [56],  prussian  blue  [57,58],  and  some  organic  material  like  polyaniline (PANI) [59], etc., for they also present specific color change when the applied  voltage changes. Their colors can have a synergy effect to strengthen the color of the ECD,  or color superposition effect with the color of WO3 to enable the ECD to have multiple  colors. For instance, when nickel oxide works as the CE layer, it turns brown when WO3  is colored, hence the color of ECD is deepened. When PANI performs the CE layer, the  EC device can have four different colors (light green, green, light blue, and dark blue) as  voltage regulates [59]. Sometimes, pure indium tin oxide (ITO) film [54,60] or fluorine  doped tin oxide (FTO) film [61] can serve as CE layer as well, because they also have a  large capacity of ions, leaving the ECD composed of four functional layers. However, it  has been reported that an ECD with only single EC layer of tungsten oxide has relatively  poorer EC performances than those of a complementary one [62,63].  WO3 is a cathodic EC material. Its color change from colorless to blue appears as a  result  of  the  insertion  of  ions  and  electrons  when  a  negative  voltage  is  applied.  This  process  is  reversible  as  the  applied  voltage  turns  positive.  Thus,  we  can  see  ECDs  as  transparent ESDs. It has also been reported that these color changes happen owing to the  change  of band gap induced  by the insertion and extraction of ions [64,65]. Figure 3d  displays  the  optical  image  of  the  color  changing  process  of  WO3.  This  process  can  be  implied as following [66]:  + − WO3 (bleached state) + xM  + xe  = MxWO3 (colored state)  (4) + + + + where M  can be H , Li , K , et al.   As introduced above, it is found that the electrochemical reactions of WO3 in ECDs  are  similar  to  those  in  SCs  and  LIBs,  which  is  very  helpful  for  the  development  of    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  7  of  42  integrated devices from WO3‐based ESD and ECD. These three kinds of devices share the  same sandwich structure. However, their different working mechanisms call for different  requirements  for  tungsten  oxide‐based  electrodes.  Nevertheless,  for  all  three  kinds  of  devices, to get fast Faradic reactions, large specific surface area and good electrochemical  conductivity of the tungsten oxides electrode are necessary.  3. Energy Storage Devices Based on Tungsten Oxides  3.1. WO3 Electrode Materials of Supercapacitors  −1 WO3, with a theoretical capacitance of 1112 F g , is promising as an electrode material  for pseudo‐capacitors, but it also has drawbacks like unpleasant conductivity, poor rate  performance, and less‐satisfying cycling stability. The main improving methods can be  divided into two parts, getting nanostructured single‐phased tungsten oxide and getting  multi‐phased structures consisting of tungsten oxides with other materials such as carbon  material, transitional oxides, and organic materials. Table 1 lists tungsten oxides as anode  in SCs and their synthesizing methods and electrochemical performances, indicating that  most of the WO3 nanostructures for the SCs were prepared by hydrothermal processes.     Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  8  of  42  Table 1. Electrochemical performances of different tungsten oxides‐based electrodes in supercapacitors from literatures.  Electrochemical Performances    Products and Structures  Synthesis Method  Potential Window, Reference  Maximum Specific  Cycling Condition, Cycles,  Electrode, Electrolyte  Capacity  Capacity Retained  + −2 −2 −1 WO3 nanofibers [67]  Hydrothermal −0.65–0 V vs. Ag/AgCl, H   2 mA cm , 1.72 F cm   10 mV s , 6000 cycles, 79.1%  Hydrothermal +  −2 −2 WO3‐x nanorods [68]  annealing in  −10 V vs. SCE, 5 M LiCl  1 mA cm , 1.83 F cm   ‐‐‐‐, 10,000 cycles, 74.8%  hydrogen atmosphere  Alcohol‐thermal  −1.0–0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 0.5M  ‐‐‐, 10,000 cycles, almost no  −2 −2 WO3 nanosheets [69]  5 mA cm , 0.659 F cm   process  Na2SO4  decrease  −1 2.5 A g , 6000 cycles, 85.11%  −2 −2 −0.65–0.05V vs. Ag/AgCl, 0.5  3 mA cm , 2.58 F cm   WO3 nanotubes [70]  Hydrothermal  (decreased from 496.4 to 422.5  −1 −1 M H2SO4  1 A g , 615.7 F g   −1 F g )  −2 −2 −2 Furball‐like WO3  2 mA cm , 8.35 F cm   2 mA cm , 10,000 cycles,  Hydrothermal −0.3–0.4 V vs. SCE, 2 M H2SO4  −1 microspheres [50]  (=708.0 F g )  93.4%   Single phase  −2 −2  −1 WO3  −0.6–0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 2 M  10 A cm , 5.21 F cm 3 A g , 2000 cycles, nearly  WO3 nanorods array [71]  Hydrothermal  −1 −1 H2SO4  1 A g , 521 F g   100%   nanostructure −1 s  100 mV s , 2000 CV cycles,  −1 −1 h‐WO3 nanorods [72]  Hydrothermal −0.7–0.2V vs. SCE, 1 M H2SO4  5 mV s , 538 F g   85%  −1 −1 0.35 A g , 694 F g ;  −1 h‐WO3 nanorods [73]  Hydrothermal −0.5–0 V vs. SCE, 1 M H2SO4  50 mV s , 2000 cycles, 87%   −1 −1 0.93 A g , 484 F g   −0.4–0.6 V vs. SCE, 0.1 M  −1 −1 WO3 Nanowires [74]  Solvothermal  1 A g , 465 F g ‐‐‐‐, 2000 cycles, 97.7%  H2SO4  −1 −1 −1 W18O49 Nanowires [75]  Solvothermal −0.4–0.4 V vs. SCE, 1 M H2SO4  1 A g , 588.33 F g   1 A g , 5000 cycles, 88%   h‐WO3 nanoflake arrays  1.0–1.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1 M  −1 −1 Hydrothermal  0.5 A g , 538 F g ‐‐‐‐, 5000 cycles, 95.5%  [51]  Na2SO4  −1 −1 −1 WO3 nanospheres [76]  Hydrothermal  SCE, 2 M H2SO4  0.5 A g , 797.05 F g   5 A g , 2000 cycles, 100.47%    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  9  of  42  Frisbee‐like h‐ −0.6–0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1M  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal  0.5 A g , 391 F g   10 A g , 2000 cycles, 100%  WO3*0.28H2O [77]  2SO4  3% Pd‐doped WO3  −0.7–0.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1 M  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal  0.5 A g , 33.34 F g   1 A g , 1100 cycles, 86.95%  nanobricks [78]  Na2SO4  Cactus‐like WO3  0.0–0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1 M  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal  0.5 A g , 485 F g   1 A g , 5000 cycles, 93%   microspheres [79]  Na2SO4  Cactus‐like WO3  −1 −1 Hydrothermal −0.6–0.2 V vs. SCE, 2 M H2SO4  5 mV s , 970.26 F g   ‐‐‐‐, ‐‐‐‐, ‐‐‐‐  microspheres [80]  −1 −1 −0.3–0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 0.5 M  0.37 A g , 605.5 F g ;  −1 Pancake‐like h‐WO3 [52]  Hydrothermal  50 mV s , 4000 cycles, 110.2%  −1 −1 H2SO4  7.5 A g , 276.0 F g   Electrochemical  −3 −3 −3 WO3 nanochannels [81]  −0.8–0.5 V, 1 M Na2SO4  2 A cm , 397 F cm   10 A cm , 3500 cycles, 114%   anodization  Flower‐like hierarchical  −1 −1 1 A g , 244 F g ;  −1 WO 4 A g 3∙H2O/reduced  Hydrothermal −0.4–0.1 V vs. SCE, 1 M H2SO4  , 900 cycles, 97%   −1 −1 10 A g , 78 F g   graphene oxide (rGO) [82]  Feather duster‐like carbon  −1 −1 One‐step  −1–−0.3 V vs. Hg/HgSO4, 0.5 M  0.5 A g  496 F g ;  −1 nanotube (CNT)@WO3  100 mV s , 8000 cycles, 196.3%  −1 −1 solvothermal  H2SO4  10 A g , 407 F g   [83]  Multi‐walled carbon  −2 −1 2 mA cm , 429.6 F g   −1 nanotubes‐tungsten  Hydrothermal −0.6–0 V vs. SCE, 1 M LiClO4  100 mV s , 5000 cycles, 94.3%  −2 (1.55 F cm )  trioxide [49]  WO3‐carbon  composites  WO3‐rGO nanoflowers  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal −0.4–0.3 V, 0.5 M H2SO4  1 A g , 495 F g   1 A g , 1000 cycles, 87.5%  [84]  WO3 nanoparticles and  −0.3–0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 2 M  −1 −1 −1 nanowires in carbon  ‐‐‐‐  5 mV s , 609 F g   50 mV s , 1000 cycles, 98%   H2SO4  aerogel [85]  −1 WO3 nanoparticles in  Solvent immersion +  −0.3–0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 2 M  500 mV s , 3000 cycles, 96%  −1 −1 5 mV s , 1055 F g   −1 carbon aerogel [86]  calcination  H2SO4  50 mV s , 1000 cycling, 101%    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  10  of  42  −1 −1 Binder‐free and additive‐ −0.6–0.6 V vs. SCE, 1 M  5 mV s , 609 F g   −1 Hydrothermal  100 mV s , 2000 cycles, 89%   −2 −1 less WO3‐MnO2 [87]  Na2SO4  2 mA cm , 540 F g   WO3*H2O/MnO2  −0.1–0.9 V vs. SCE, 0.5 M  −1 −1 −1 Anodic deposition  0.5 A g , 363 F g   2 A g , 5000 cycles, 93.8%  nanosheets [88]  Na2SO4  WO3–V2O5  Microwave assisted  −1 WO3‐ KOH electrolyte  ‐‐‐‐, 173 F g   ‐‐‐‐, 5000 cycles, 126%   nanocomposites [89]  wet chemical route  transition  oxide  2D WO3/TiO2  Atomic layer  0.0–0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1 M  −1 −1 −1 1 A g , 625.53 F g   6 A g , 2000 cycles, 97.98%  composites  heterojunction [90]  deposition (ALD)  H2SO4  TiO2 nanoparticles‐ Two‐step atomic layer  −1 −1 0.0–0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl, 1 M  1.5 A g , 342.5 F g   −1 functionalized 2D WO3  deposition process +  6 A g , 2000 cycles, 94.7%   −1 −1 H2SO4  30 A g , 285.3 F g   film [91]  post‐annealing  Template assisted  −1 −1 Porous WO3@CuO [92]  0.0–0.5 V vs. SCE, 6 M KOH  1 A g , 284 F g ‐‐‐‐, 1500 cycles, 85.2%  method  −1 −1 Electrochemical  −0.3–0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl, (in 3  1.4 A g , 615 F g   PEDOT/WO ‐‐‐‐, ‐‐‐‐,‐‐‐‐  3 [93]  −1 −1 deposition  M NaCl), 0.5 M H2SO4  10 A g , 308 F g   WO3‐organic  materials  In situ oxidative  5000 cycles, no significant  −1 −1 composites  2 A g , 586 F g ;  WO3@PPy [94]  polymerization  −0.8–0.0 V vs. SCE, 2 M KOH  changes in resistive property  −1 20 A g , 78% retained  process  and morphology    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  11  of  42  3.1.1. Single Phase WO3 Nanostructures   It is well known that nanostructured materials have larger specific surface area by  fining the size of materials, which makes them fully exposed to the electrolyte. The inner  active materials can be very accessible to ions and electrons so that redox reactions can be  accelerated. WO3‐based nanostructures, including quantum dots [95] (Figure 5a) and nano  particles,  nanofibers  [67],  nanorods  [68,  72,73],  nanotubes  [70],  nanochannels  [81]  and  nanowires  [74,75],  nanoflakes  [51],  nanoplates  and  nanosheets  [69]  (Figure  5c),  nanospheres  [76],  and  nanoflowers  have  all  been  researched.  Cong  et  al.  [95]  demonstrated that the WO3 quantum dots have better reversibility according to the more  symmetric charge‐discharge curve (Figure 5b) and more excellent rate performance. In  particular,  the  WO3  nanosheets  made  by  Yin  et  al. [69]  can  retain  a  capacity retention  almost  100%  after  10,000  cycles  (Figure  5d).  Huang  et  al.  [96]  got  WO3  samples  with  different morphology by hydrothermal method: nanorods, nanoplates, and microspheres  assembled of numerous nanorods. Among them, the ball cactus‐like WO3 microspheres  had larger specific surface area and more tunnels across these nanorods, translating into  lower equivalent series resistance (Rs) and excellent cycling stability, showing the best  capacitive performance.  Figure 5. (a) High‐resolution TEM image of as‐prepared monodispersed tungsten oxide spherical  quantum dots (QDs) with average sizes of 1.6 nm; (b) galvanostatic charge/discharge curves for  QDs and bulk materials under currents of 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 mA within potential from ‐0.5 to  0.2 V. Adapted with permission from [95]. Copyright John Wiley and Sons, 2014. High resolution  SEM image (c) and cycling stability (d) of WO3 nanosheets. Adapted with permission from [69].  Copyright Elsevier, 2018.  Apart from the aforementioned nanostructures, there are also other more complex  and interesting morphologies assembled by smaller nano‐units. For example, Shao et al.  [77] prepared frisbee‐like WO3∙nH2O microstructure assembled with numerous nanorods  (Figure 6a,b). Thanks to this special micro/nano structure, it had high specific capacity of  −1 −1 −1 −1 391 F g  at 0.5 A g  and good rate capacity of 298 F g  under 10 A g . After 2000 charge‐ discharge  cycles,  its  capacitance  retention  is  around  100%  (Figure  6c).  By  doping  Pd,  Gupta et al. [78] changed the morphology from nanosheets‐assembled cabbage pure WO3  into nanobricks‐assembled cauliflower Pd‐doped WO3, achieving larger surface area. He    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  12  of  42  et al. [50] fabricated a special furball‐like microsphere, of which the core was assembled  by a large number of nanorods and the shell was many other fluffy nanorods connecting  each core, resulting in a porous 3D structure network. Notably, when used as the electrode  in  SC,  even  after  10,000  charge‐discharge  cycles,  93.4%  of  its  initial  capacitance  was  maintained. In addition, WO3 3D nanorods array [71], cactus‐like microspheres hierarchy  3D structure assembled by numerous nanorods [79,80], mesoporous pancake‐like h‐WO3  [52], and WO3∙H2O flower‐like hierarchical architecture composed of nanosheets [82] have  also been reported, showing much enhanced performance in comparison to most WO3.  −1 Figure 6. (a) Schematic illustration of the formation, (b) FE‐SEM image, (c) charge‐discharge curves at 0.5 A g , and (c)  −1 cycling test at 10 A g  of the frisbee‐shaped crystalline h‐WO3∙0.28H2O. Adapted with permission from [77]. Copyright  Elsevier, 2018.   3.1.2. Multi‐Phased Tungsten Oxide Nanocomposites  Combining WO3 with other materials into composite is another direct way to achieve  better  performances  in  terms  of  good  conductivity,  high  capacitance,  and  excellent  stability. These composites obtained may possess the strengths of a single component and  it is much easier to get a special structure that will further optimize its performances.   Carbon materials have been frequently chosen for their attractive conductivity and  low cost. Additionally, they are also used as an electrode in double‐layer capacitors. The  combination of double‐layer capacitor material with pseudo‐capacity material can have  strengthened stability, capacitance, and rate performance. Di et al. [83] fabricated a feather  duster‐like  carbon  nanotube  (CNT)@WO3  composite,  in  which  WO3  nanosheet  grows  uniformly on the surface of CNT. After 8000 cycles of repeating cyclic voltammetry (CV)  −1 test at 100 mV s , this composite still retained 96.3% of its initial capacitance. Through a  two‐step  hydrothermal  method,  Shinde  et  al.  [49]  made  a  composite  in  which  multi‐ walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) uniformly grew on the carbon cloth substrate and  with WO3 nanorods growing on the MWCNTs. The prepared 3D structure had a large  surface area and good structural stability. Chu et al. [84] synthesized WO3 nanoflower,  well‐coated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets. The capacity of WO3 and  −1 −1 −1 WO3‐rGO composite were 127 F g  and 495 F g  respectively at current density of 1 A g ,  −1 and when the current density was 5 A g , capacity of the composite was as high as 401 F  −1 g .  These  improvements  were  down  to  the  shorter  ion  diffusion  paths  and  3D  nanostructure  of  the  composite.  Liu  et  al.  [85]  embedded  WO3  hybrid  nanowires  and  −1 nanoparticles in carbon aerogel and the electrode also showed a high capacity of 609 F g .    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  13  of  42  Later, they used the same method dispersing size‐selected WO3 nanoparticles in carbon  aerogel and the results were also very pleasing [86].   Transition  oxide  materials  such  as  V2O5,  MnO2,  CuO,  and  TiO2  are  other  typical  electrode materials for pseudo‐capacitors owing to their high capacitance and stability,  and  they  are  often  used  to  form  a  composite  with  WO3.  Shinde  et  al.  [87]  got  a  −1 nanostructured composite of WO3 and MnO2, which had high capacity of 540 F g  at 2  −2 mA cm  and good stability with 89% retention of initial capacitance after 2000 CV tests.  Yuan’s group [88] also prepared nano‐WO3*H2O/MnO2 composite with high capacity of  −1 −1 363 F g  at 0.5 A g . Periasamy et al. [89] reported a rod‐shaped WO3‐V2O5 composite  prepared  by  microwave‐assisted  wet‐chemical  method.  When  in  KOH  electrolyte,  its  capacity was higher than pure WO3 by some distance. Moreover, it was noteworthy that  after 5000 long cycles, the composite showed excellent capacity retention of 126% and had  Coulombic efficiency of 100% up to 5000 cycles. In addition, WO3/TiO2 composites [90,91]  and WO3@CuO composites [92] have been researched.   As  well  as  carbon  materials  and  transition  oxide  materials,  organic  materials,  especially  conductive  polymers,  such  as  PANI,  poly‐3,4‐ethylenedioxithiophene  (PEDOT), and poly‐pyrrole (PPy), are also preferred to combine with WO3 for their high  conductivity, low cost, and easy fabrication. Zhuzhelskii’s group [93] dispersed WO3 in  PEDOT. The porous PEDOT matrix ensured fast ion and electron transfer, thus promoting  the  electrochemical  performance.  Similarly,  Das  et  al.  [94]  fabricated  a  WO3@PPy  composite, in which WO3 nanostick is the core and PPy capsulated WO3. Owing to the  high  conductivity  of  PPy  and the  specific  structure,  shorter  diffusion  path  length  and  greater stability were realized.  3.2. Tungsten Oxide‐Based Materials as Anodes in Lithium Ion Battery  As mentioned before, when used as anode material in LIB, tungsten oxides suffer  from structural collapses and fast capacity decreases during the charge‐discharge cycling  owing to the large volume change. Additionally, their low conductivity results in poor  rate performance. So far, as listed in Table 2, some effective methods have been offered to  improve  the  electrochemical  performances  of  tungsten  oxides.  When  O  vacancies  are  introduced into tungsten oxides, its conductivity may be largely improved, and changing  vacancy concentration to get increased conductivity has been tried. Nanostructures are  not  only adopted  in SCs but  also in  LIBs.  Moreover,  adding  carbon  materials  such  as  graphite, reduced graphite, and carbon nanotubes into tungsten oxide to get complex is  also often adopted due to their high conductivity and structural stability.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  14  of  42  Table 2. Electrochemical performances of different tungsten oxide‐based electrodes in lithium battery from the literature.  Electrochemical Performances  Synthesis  Initial    Products and Structures  Voltage Window, Current Density,  Current Density/(mA/g), Cycles,  Method  Efficienc Capacity (Initial/Second)  Capacity Retained  y  −1 m‐WO3‐x [97]  Template method  53%  0–2.5V, ‐‐‐,748 mA h g  (1st)  ‐‐‐,‐‐‐, ‐‐‐  Non‐ 100 mA/g, 150 cycles, 954 mA h  stochiometric  Thermal  −1 −1 0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 1760 mA h g   N‐WOx [98]  52.2%  −1 g   tungsten  annealing  −1 (1st); 817 mA h g  (2nd)  −1 −1 10 A g , 4000 cycles, 228 mA h g   oxides  −1 −1 Nanogranular WO3 with excess  Magnetron  0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 778.8 mA h g   −1 ‐‐‐  1 A g , 500 cycles, 217% retained  oxygen [99]  sputtering  (1st)  −1 −1 0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 1121.4 mA h g   −1 100 mA g , 200 cycles, 900 mA h  WO3 Nanotubes [70]  Hydrothermal  77.8%  (1st)  −1 g   −1 −1 WO3 nanowires [100]  Hydrothermal  55.3%  0–3.0V, 0.1C, 954 mA h g  (1st)  0.1 C, 100 cycles, 552 mA h g   Nanostructure d tungsten  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal +  0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 2086.4 mA h g   100 mA g , 100 cycles, 720.5 mA  oxides  Flower‐like h‐WO3 [101]  ‐‐‐  −1 calcination  (1st)  h g   Soft template  −1 −1 WO3 hollow nanospheres [102]  74.0%  0–3.0V, 0.2 C, 1054 mA h g  (1st)  0.2 C, 100 cycles, 294 mA h g   assisted method  Carbon‐ Hydrothermal +  3D sandwich‐type architecture  −1 tungsten  ultrasonic  1800 mA g , 500 cycles, 397 mA h  −1 −1 with 2D WO3 nanoplatelets and 2D  71.8%  0–3.0V, 72 mA g , 1262 mA h g  (1st)  −1 oxides  stirring + thermal  g GS [103]  composites  treatment    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  15  of  42  WO3 nanoplates and graphene  −1 Hydrothermal +  400 mA g , 50 cycles, 455 mA h  nanosheets 2D nanocomposites  ‐‐‐  ‐‐‐, ‐‐‐, ‐‐‐  −1 heating process  g  (64.3% retained)  [104]  Bamboo‐like WO3 nanorods  −1 Hydrothermal +  80 mA/g, 100 cycles, 828 mA h g   −1 anchored on 3D nitrogen‐doped  64.5%  0–3.0V, 1280 mA h g  (1st)  heating process  (73.8% retained)  graphene frameworks [105]  −1 −1 −1 WO3 nanosheet@rGO square  0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 1143 mA h g   100 mA g , 150 cycles, 1005.7 mA  Hydrothermal  87.9%  particles [106]  (1st)  h/g  h‐WO3 nanorods embedded into  Ultrasonic  −1 −1 −1 0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 1030 mA h g   1500 mA g , 200 cycles, 196 mA h  nitrogen, sulfur co‐doped rGO  processing +  ‐‐‐  −1 −1 (1st), 816.3 mA h g  (2nd)  g   nanosheets (54 wt %) [107]  hydrothermal  WO3 particles deposited on 3D  −1 −1 −1 Hydrothermal +  0–3.0V, 50 mA g , 1120 mA h g  (1st), 150 mA g , 100 cycles, 487 mA h  macroporous rGO frameworks  57.23%  −1 −1 freeze‐drying  719 mA h g  (2nd)  g  (~99% retained)  [108]  Evaporation  −1 −1 Ordered mesoporous carbon/WO3  0–3.0V, 100 A g , 1275 mA h g  (1st),  100 mA/g, 100 cycles, 440 mA h  induced self‐ 56.2%  −1 −1 [109]  712 mA h g  (2nd)  g   assembly  −1 −1 −1 Cauliflower‐like WO3 decorated  Hydrothermal +  0–3.0V, 50 mA g , 750 mA h g  (1st)  50 mA/g, 50 cycles, 650 mA h g   67%  −1 with carbon [110]  firing  and 500 mA h g  (2nd)  (~Li5.5WO3)    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  16  of  42  −1 Template  0–3.0V, C/20, 10,791 mA h g  (1st),  −1 Carbon‐coated 3D WO3 [111]  60.1%  ‐‐‐, 500 cycles, 253 mA h g   −1 assisted process  649mA h g  (2nd)  −1 −1 −1 WO3*0.33H2O@C nanoparticles  Low temperature  0–3.0V, 100 mA g , 1543 mA h g   100 mA g , 200 cycles, 816 mA h  46.1%  −1 [112]  combustion   (1st)  g   −1 −1 −1 Acid‐assisted  0–3.0V, 200 mA g , 1866 mA h g   200 mA g , 100 cycles, 662 mA h  Ultrathin WO3−x/C nanosheets [113]  39.4%  −1 −1 one‐pot process  (1st), 893 mA h g  (2nd)  g     Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  17  of  42  3.2.1. Non‐Stoichiometric Tungsten Oxides  As introduced above, substoichiometric tungsten oxides are common in the natural  world. O vacancies within them have a positive effect on the transport of electrons. In  addition, WO3 is an n‐type semiconductor, whose conductivity mainly depends on the  concentration  of  free  electrons  in  their  conduction  bands  or,  in  other  words,  the  concentration of donor within it [114]. By adjusting the ratio of W and O within tungsten  oxides, the concentration of vacancies is changed accordingly, and its conductivity can  drastically increase  [115].  Thus,  substoichiometric  tungsten  oxides  such  as  W18O49  and  W20O58  and  tungsten  oxides  with  naturally  existing  O  vacancies  are  preferred.  For  example, Yoon et al. [97] prepared a mesoporous m‐WO3‐x electrode. Though its initial  −1 Coulombic efficiency is only 53%, its reversible capacity reached 748 mA h g . Moreover,  −1 its electrical conductivity of 1.76 S cm  is also very competitive to mesoporous carbon  −1 materials (3.0 S cm ). Li et al. [116] increased the density of O vacancy in tungsten oxide  by annealing WO3 in N2 environment. The introduced O vacancy remarkably enhanced  the  conductivity  of  tungsten  oxide,  giving  rise  to  excellent  rate  performance  and  reversibility of the electrode.   Appropriate  O  vacancies  concentration  can  translate  into  improved  conductivity  while excess O vacancies may be self‐defeating. Sometimes we can also fill the O vacancy  with other atoms that have similar diameter to O atom. Cui et al. [98] refilled O vacancies  with N atom in WOx (Figure 7a), transforming it into ultrafine disordered clusters (Figure  7b). The introduction of N offered many redox sites and facilitated the electrochemical  kinetics, thus getting superior high‐rate performance (Figure 7c). Aside from introducing  O  vacancies  into  tungsten  oxides,  excess  O  in  tungsten  oxides  is  also  helpful  because  excess O can result in distortion of tunnels within tungsten oxides. Inamdar et al. [99]  obtained tungsten oxide with excess O by adjusting the ratio of Ar to O2 in radiofrequency  (RF) magnetron sputtering process. Results showed that the charge transfer resistance of  WOx under the gas ratio of 7:3 was tested to be 215 Ω, much lower compared with 370.8  Ω  when  the gas is  pure  Ar.  They attributed this  to the  increased  donor  concentration  induced by excess O in tungsten oxide. It is worth noting that the performance of tungsten  oxide with excess O under high current density was also impressive.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  18  of  42  Figure 7. (a) Schematic illustration of the synthesis process for WOx and N‐WOx; (b) high‐magnification high angle annular  dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF‐STEM) image of N‐WOx; (c) rate performance of WOx, N‐ −1 −1 WOx, and WO3 between 0.1 A g  to 10 A g . Adapted with permission from [98]. Copyright John Wiley and Sons, 2019.  3.2.2. Nano‐Structured Tungsten Oxides  Through  the  sol‐gel  method,  hydrothermal  method,  and  template  method,  nano‐ structured tungsten oxides can be easily obtained. Wu et al. [70] made WO3 nanotube  bundles  by  one‐step  hydrothermal  and  post‐annealing  process.  Its  initial  specific  −1 discharge  capacity  and  initial  Coulombic  efficiency  were  871.9  mA  h  g   and  77.8%,  respectively. Lim et al. [100] prepared WO3 nanocrystals and nanowires. Both samples  −1 showed high initial capacity of 867 and 954 mA h g  at 0.1C. For instance, after 100 cycles,  −1 the specific discharge capacity of WO3 nanowires retained 552 mA h g , and its average  Coulombic  efficiency  was  97.2%  during  2–100  cycles.  Yang  et  al.  [101]  synthesized  hierarchical  flower‐like  WO3  using  HCOOH  as  structure‐directing  agent  in  the  hydrothermal method (Figure 8a). Every flower petal consisted of numerous nanorods  −1 −1 (Figure 8b). At a current density of 100 mA g , its reversible capacity was 766 mA h g   −1 after 50 cycles and still remained at 720 mA h g  even after 100 cycles. Additionally, under  −1 −1 current density of 500 mA h g , its capacity was as high as 576.8 mA h g . All the results  demonstrated good cycling and rate performance for the hierarchical flower‐like WO3.  Sasidharan  et  al.  [102]  used  poly(styrene‐b‐[3‐(methacryloylamino)  propyl]  trimethylammonium  chloride‐b‐ethylene  oxide)  micelles  (PS‐PMAPTAC‐PEO)  as  the  template  to  produce  WO3  hollow  nanospheres.  The  whole  triblock  copolymer  is  composed of PS as its core, PMAPTAC as its shell and PEO as its corona. PMAPTAC can  2+ effectively  bind  with  WO4   cations.  After  the  following  calcinations,  the  polymeric  template is completely removed and the WO3 hollow nanosphere can be produced.     Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  19  of  42  Figure  8.  (a)  Schematic  illustration  of  the  formation  of  hierarchical  flower‐like  WO3∙0.33H2O;  (b)  SEM  image  of  WO3∙0.33H2O. Adapted with permission from [101]. Copyright Society of Chemistry, 2011. (c) Schematic illustration of the  formation of 3D hierarchical sandwich‐type tungsten trioxide nanoplatelets and graphene (TTNPs‐GS); (d) SEM overall  −1 appearance of single TTNPs‐GS; (e) long cycling stability at 1080 mA g  for 1000 cycles of TTNPs‐GS. Adapted with  permission from [103]. Copyright Elsevier, 2016.   3.2.3. Tungsten Oxide‐Carbon Composites  Introducing carbon materials into tungsten oxide to get composite can have several  advantages. One is that the composite can integrate the advantages of both tungsten oxide  and carbon material. The other is that it is more possible to form facile structures with  high structure stability. Graphene is a flat monolayer based on single carbon atoms layer  in a honeycomb lattice. This specific 2D structure gives it a super high theoretical specific  2 −1 surface area (2675 m  g ) [117] and offers high thermal and electronic conductivity. Zeng  et al. [106] synthesized hierarchical sandwich composite consisting of WO3 nanoplatelets  and graphene (Figure 8c). They added WO3*H2O nanoplatelets into the well‐dispersed  graphene oxide solution and then stirred the solution to form homogeneous suspension.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  20  of  42  Following that was the vacuum filtration process. After WO3*H2O nanoplatelets‐GO was  peeled  from  the  membrane,  it  then  underwent  heat  treatment  and  finally  the  WO3  nanoplatelets and graphene were obtained (Figure 8d). WO3 was embedded uniformly in  the interlayer of graphene so that the electrode had stable cycling performance since the  volume expansion of WO3 can be effectively relieved during cycling. At current density  −1 −1 of 1080 mA g , its reversible capacity was kept at around 615 mA h g  after 1000 cycles  (Figure  8e).  Kim  et  al.  [104]  reported  a  2D  nanocomposite  consisting  of  graphene  −1 nanosheets with WO3 nanoplates well scattered on it. After 50 cycles at 80 mA g , its  −1 −1 capacity was 688.8 mA h g  compared with 555.2 mA h g  of pure WO3. Gu et al. [105]  produced  bamboo‐like  WO3  nanorods  anchored  on  the  N‐doped  3D  graphene  frameworks.  This  composite  can  effectively  bear  the  volume  change  and  it  provided  higher conductivity for superior high‐rate capability   Reduced graphene oxide (rGO), usually obtained by reducing graphene oxide [118],  is widely used to achieve better electrochemical performances of tungsten oxides. Dang  et al. [106] successfully embedded WO3 nanoplates in a rGO matrix with a hydrothermal  −1 method followed by a heating treatment. Surprisingly, after 150 cycles under 100 mA g ,  −1 −1 its discharge capacity remained at 1005.7 mA h g , nearly twice that (565 mA h g ) of  pure WO3. The main reasons for this improvement can be ascribed to the fact that rGO  can not only offer easier access for ions and electrons but also largely buffer the damage  to its structure during cycling. Huang et al. [107] produced h‐WO3 nanorods embedded in  −1 the rGO matrix doped with N and S. At a current density of 100 mA g , the composite  −1 possessed a specific discharge capacity of 1030.3 mA h g  at the first cycle and was down  −1 slightly to 816 mA h g  in the second cycle. Moreover, at a high current density of 1500  −1 −1 mA g , its specific discharge capacity was averaged at 196.1 mA h g  over 200 cycles.  Park  et  al.  [108]  dispersed  WO3  particles  on  3D  macroporous  rGO  frameworks.  This  special structure and rGO’s good conductivity jointly improved its rate capability and  cycling stability.  Mesoporous carbon material is another kind of carbon material with high electrical  and thermal conductivity, highly porous structure, and large specific surface area [119].  Wang et al. [109] dispersed ultrasmall WO3 nanocrystals into mesoporous carbon matrix.  During the preparing process, the W species were limited by the carbon matrix, making  2 −1 the particle size of WO3 around 3 nm and high surface area of 157 m  g  for the composite.  −1 After 100 cycles at current density of 100 mA g , its specific discharge capacity was 440  −1 mA h g . Kim et al. [120] also achieved a nanocomposite in which WOx nanoparticles were  uniformly embedded in the mesoporous carbon matrix. Its main improvement was the  lower  polarization  during  the  delithiation  process  owing  to  the  high  conductivity  of  mesoporous carbon matrix and shorter lithium on diffusion pathway.  Aside from the above‐mentioned carbon materials, amorphous carbon materials are  also often used to achieve better electrochemical performance. For example, Yoon et al.  [110]  coated  cauliflower‐like  WO3  with  a  thin  layer  of  carbon  (Figure  9a–c),  which  strengthened the electrochemical correlation between active WO3 and current collector  and buffered the volume change as well. It showed much better cycling stability and rate  performance than the pure WO3 (Figure 9d). Herdt et al. [111] made WO3 nanorod arrays  encapsulated in a thin layer of carbon. After 200 cycles of charge‐discharge at C/20, the  vertical arrangement of nanorods were maintained, indicating the outstanding structural  stability  of  this  composite.  In  addition,  Liu  et  al.  [112]  obtained  a  WO3*0.33H2O@C  composite in which amorphous carbon was coated around WO3*0.33H2O. Interestingly,  in his study, an appropriate amount of carbon coating can have positive effects while it  can be self‐defeating when the amount of carbon is in excess because it decreased the  crystallinity  of  WO3∙0.33H2O  and  sacrificed  the  capacity  of  the  composite  as  well.  Furthermore,  Bao  et  al.  [113]  reported  that  the  ultrathin  WO3‐x  nanoplate  doped  with  carbon also showed excellent electrochemical performance.     Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  21  of  42  Figure 9. (a) Schematic illustration of the synthetic procedure, (b,c) SEM images for cauliflower‐like carbon‐coated WO3;  (d) comparison of cycling performances of cauliflower‐like WO3 and cauliflower‐like carbon‐coated WO3. Adapted with  permission from [110]. Copyright Elsevier, 2014.  4. Electrochromic Applications  4.1. Tungsten Oxides as EC Electrode in Visible Light Area  Previous works about WO3 mostly concentrated on improving its EC performances  in  visible  light  spectrum  area,  with  EC  performances  in  the  near  infrared  (NIR)  and  infrared (IR) spectrum area neglected. Their objects focused on getting WO3 EC films with  wider  optical  modulation  amplitudes,  shorter  response  times,  and  higher  coloration  efficiency  in  the  visible  light  area.  To  achieve  these,  efforts  involving  getting  nanostructured tungsten oxides, porous structured tungsten oxides, and doped tungsten  oxides were widely made.   For example, tungsten oxide nanorods were produced by Khoo’s group [121] and its  bleaching response time was significantly shortened to 4.5 s. Tungsten oxide nanobrick  was  synthesized  by  Kondalkar  et  al.  [122],  possessing  fast  switching  response  with  coloration time and bleaching time of 6.9 and 9.7 s, respectively. Bhosale et al. [123] got  WO3  nanoflowers  film  on  the  HCl‐etched  ITO  substrate,  its  coloration  efficiency  and  cycling stability had also been highly enhanced. Moreover, tungsten oxide quantum‐dots,  [124]  nanowire  arrays  [125,126],  nanobundles  [127],  nanosheets  [128],  nanoflakes  [60],  nanotrees [129,130], and nanoparticle‐nanorod mixed structure [131] have been produced  and tested to have enhanced EC performances.  Doping  tungsten  oxides  with  an  appropriate  amount  of  other  elements  can  have  constructive  effects  on  EC  performances  because  the  introduced  deficiencies,  morphology, and structure changes of the film adjust tungsten oxides’ crystallization and  offer more ion storage sites. Peng et al. [132] got Ti‐doped WO3 thin films that had less  decay  after  200  CV  cycles  than  pure  WO3.  Koo  et  al.  [133]  added  Fe  into  WO3  film.  Compared  with  the  switching  time  of  11.7  and  14.6  s  for  coloring  and  bleaching,  respectively, of bare WO3, those were 7.2 and 2.2 s for 5% Fe‐doped WO3. WO3 films doped  with C [134], N [135], P [136], Ni [126,137], Mo [138,139], Co [140], Sb [141], Ag [142], Au  [143], Gd [144], Tb [145], SiO2 [146], TiO2 [147], V2O5 [148], etc., have been reported before.  Their positive effects on WO3 EC films are summarized in Figure 10.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  22  of  42  Figure 10. Improvements of WO3 film doped with different materials.  4.2. Tungsten Oxides as EC Electrode in NIR Area  Research shows that WO3 thin films have good control of the transmittance of not  only  visible  light  but  also  NIR  and  IR  light  so  the  temperature  can  be  dynamically  modulated, since IR light is the main resource of heat from the sun [36,48,62,149]. Jian et  al.  [150]  reported  that  the  WO3/PEDOT:  PSS  (poly  (3,4‐ethylenedioxythiophene):poly  (styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS).) smart window can effectively reduce the heat across it.  They detected the temperature of the back side of a small chamber that was assembled  with an EC window as its front side (Figure 11a–c). When a halogen lamp worked as a  radiation resource, it turned out that the temperature of the back side of the chamber was  3.3 °C lower as the EC window was darkened compared to the value as the EC window  was bleached, demonstrating the EC film can effectively block heat (Figure 11d). Li et al.  [151]  made  1D  W18O49  nanomaterials  for  NIR  shielding.  These  films  all  had  high  transmittance in the visible light area. However, they did not explore the transmittance  change  during  the  color‐changing  process.  Liu  et  al.  [62]  made  a  flexible  ECD  with  transmission modulation of 63% between 760 and 1600 nm while they did not dig into the  relationship between the transmittance of visible light and NIR light.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  23  of  42  Figure 11. (a) Experiment setup for measurement of the capability of WO3/PH1000‐based ECD on the modulation of solar  heat;  the  thermal‐imaging  photography  of  the  chamber  under  (b)  bleached  state  and  (c)  darkened  state;  (d)  the  temperature  values  of  EC  window  (T1)  and  the  back  side  of  the  chamber  (T2)  under  bleached  and  darkened  states.   from [150]. Copyright Elsevier, 2018.   Adapted with permission 4.2.1. Inverse Opal‐Structured Tungsten Oxides  Inverse opal (IO) structure is a kind of 3D layered porous structure. It is favorable for  its large specific surface area and artificially‐ordered periodic layered configuration. This  structure is often achieved by the template‐assisted method, in which the template used  is opal structure. After the material is deposited on the template, the template is removed,  and the IO structure is obtained. Its large specific surface area was a result of the porosity  obtained  after  the  removal  of  template  material  so  that  electrolyte  penetration  can  be  bettered and the transmission of both electrons and ions are accelerated [146,147]. Owing  to the periodicity and uniformity of the template, the final product also has a periodic and  uniform structure, thus light reflection and refraction can be enhanced and it is beneficial  for effective reduction of visible and NIR light transmittance [146,148,149].  Yang et al. [152] produced an ordered microporous tungsten oxide IO film using PS  with different diameters as the template, followed by the process of removing PS through  immersing the sample into tetrahydrofuran (THF), following which the porous tungsten  oxide film was obtained (Figure 12a,b). Compared with the dense tungsten oxide film, this  porous film showed high optical density and coloration efficiency in the NIR area (Figure  12c,d).  They also  found that smaller  diameter  of the  porous and  higher integration  of  ordered  porous  structure  can  translate  into  better  EC  performances.  Later,  a  uniform  SnO2‐WO3 core‐shell IO structure was reported by Nguyen et al. [153], aiming at good  control  of  the  transmission  of  NIR  radiation  without  reduction  in  the  transmission  of  visible light. They firstly got the SnO2 IO structure on the ITO coated base after removing  PS. Following that was the electrodeposition of WO3. Finally, the specific core‐shell SnO2‐ WO3  IO  structure  was  successfully  obtained.  This  EC  film  displayed  high  visible  transparency of 70.3%, 67.1% at the wavelength of 400 nm at colored state, and blocked  62% of the NIR radiation at the same time. Later, adopting a similar method, Ling et al.  [154]  also  made  a  TiO2–WO3  core–shell  IO  structure,  which  displayed  well  improved  electrochromic performance in the NIR region as well.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  24  of  42  Figure 12. (a) SEM patterns of polystyrene (PS) template and (b) ordered macroporous WO3 films;  (c) optical density and (d) coloration efficiency of WO3 films and ordered macroporous films.  Adapted with permission from [152]. Copyright Elsevier, 2012.   4.2.2. Dynamic Control of Visible and NIR Light of Tungsten Oxide ECDs  Different from the aforementioned studies that realized mere transmittance control  of visible or NIR light, there were reports about dynamic transmittance control of both at  the same time. In other words, when these materials are adopted in EC windows, three  modes can be achieved, namely bright mode when both the transmittance of visible and  NIR light are relatively high; cool mode when the transmittance of visible light is high  while that of NIR light is relatively low; and dark mode when transmittance of both of  them  is  low  [155].  Zhang  et  al.  [155]  synthesized  oxygen‐deficient  tungsten  oxide  nanowires  that  was  able  to  control  the  transmittance  of  NIR  and  visible  light  independently. The film showed bright mode when the potential applied on active film  was 4.0 V, cool mode when the potential was between 2.8 and 2.6 V, and dark mode when  the  potential  was  2.0  V  (Figure  13a–d).  Reports  have  shown  that  amorphous  and  polycrystalline WO3 have different responses of light; that is, the light absorption peak of  amorphous WO3 is more shifted into blue than that of crystalline WO3. Lia et al. [151]  prepared WO3 films with hybrid phases to adjust the transmittance of visible and NIR  light. It is reported that the WO3 flexible ECD they made had three different modes for the  absorption  of  light  in  response  to  the  applied  voltage  because  an  amorphous  and  a  hexagonal phase of WO3 were both observed in the film. When the applied potential was  lower than 1.1 V, the response of the NIR area was more active since the hexagonal portion  of WO3 was at play, while under higher voltages, the response of visible area active for  the amorphous portion was reduced (Figure 13e,f).    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  25  of  42  Figure 13. Optical transmittance spectra of the bulk m‐WO3 film (a) and m‐WO3‐x nanowires film  (b); (c) solar irradiance spectra of m‐WO3‐x nanowires films at 4, 2.8, 2.6 and 2 V; (d) physical  photos of m‐WO3‐x nanowires films on ITO glasses at 4 V, 2.8 V, 2.6 V, and 2 V (vs. Li /Li).  Adapted with permission from [155]. Copyright Royal Society of Chemistry, 2014. (e) Visible‐NIR  spectra showing the change in absorbance when a voltage is applied on the device, between the on  (i.e., negative voltage, reduced tungsten oxide) and the off (i.e., positive voltage, oxidized tungsten  oxide) states at 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, 1.1, 1.3, 1.5, 1.7, and 1.9 V; (f) zoom of the spectra obtained with lower  voltages. Adapted with permission from [156]. Copyright American Chemical Society, 2012.  5. Electrochromic Energy Storage Devices (ECESDs)  As mentioned above, tungsten oxide is not only one of the candidates of electrode  material in ESDs, including LIBs and SCs, but also an excellent material for ECDs. One  device integrating these two functions has come into reality [157,158]. The idea of this  integration rests chiefly on the following arguments. Firstly, ESDs share almost the same  structure with ECDs, the sandwich structure [7,159]. Secondly, the working mechanisms  of these two types of devices are also very similar. They both run relying on the redox  reactions of ions in the electrolyte and active electrodes [160]. Thirdly, in the integrated  device, tungsten oxide materials can be the electrode of the energy storage part and EC  part  at  the  same  time  [161,162].  Of  course,  aside  from  tungsten  oxides,  many  other  materials, especially some transitional metal oxides and conductive polymers, can be used  as the active material in an integrated device as well. For example, bifunctional devices  based on nickel oxide [163], vanadium pentoxide [164], and PANI [165,166] have all been  reported before. These bifunctional devices can show us dynamic color signals, of which  we can make good use to monitor how the device is running and to judge whether the  device needs charging in case of energy cut‐off. For another use, the energy stored in ECDs  can be further used. Another relation is that the close charging and discharging time of  SCs and switching time of EC devices also links them together. Consequently, integration  of ECDs and SCs is more common compared with the integration of ECDs and batteries.  However, in some situations where switching time does not matter that much, like smart  windows and smart sunglasses, integrated ECBs can still have their place. Furthermore,  as researchers are making dedicated efforts towards fast charging techniques of batteries,  this gap is being filled in. In the following subsection, we will discuss tungsten oxides  ECESDs  from  two  main  angles:  research  on  single  tungsten  oxide  electrode  and  exploration on complete ECSCs containing tungsten oxides as an electrode.        Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  26  of  42  5.1. Tungsten Oxides Based ECESDs  Approaches to enhance bifunctional performances of tungsten oxides electrode are  very  similar  to  those  that  improve  electrochromic  performance  and  energy  storage  performances.  They  are  merely  getting  porous  nanostructure,  doping,  and  integrating  tungsten oxide with other materials, especially organic materials (see Tables 1–3). Figure  14  sketches  the  main  modification  methods  adopted  by  researchers.  Most  often,  these  methods are not adopted alone but two or three methods are adopted at the same time.  Table 3 presents the electrochemical and EC performances of tungsten‐based bifunctional  electrodes.  Figure 14. Main modification methods of tungsten oxide‐based materials applied in electrochemical applications.    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  27  of  42  Table 3. Performance of tungsten oxide‐based electrochromic energy storage electrodes from literatures.  Electro‐ Electrochromic Performances  Chromic  Products and  Energy Storage  Optical  Color  Method  Energy  Cycling Performances  Switching  Structures  Capacity (C)  Transmittance  Efficiency/( Storage  Time (tc, tb)/s  Modulation (▲T)  cm /C)  Type  1000 cycles, ▲T 83.7% retained  WO3 nanosheets [167]  Hydrothermal  ECSC  64.5% (633 nm)  6.6, 3.8  48.9  14.9 mF/cm   C 84.5% retained  WO3∙H2O nanosheet  Hydrothermal  ECSC  79.0% (633 nm)  10.1, 6.1  42.6  43.30 mF/cm   2000 cycles, ▲T 87.8% retained  [168]  Oxygen‐rich  Oblique‐angle  −1 −1 ECSC  82% (630 nm) ‐‐‐, ‐‐‐  ~170  0.25 A g , 228 F g   2000 cycles, C 75% retained  nanograin WO3 [169]  sputtering  Mesoporous WO3 film  −1 Sol‐gel  ECB  75.6% (633 nm)  2.4, 1.2  79.7  75.3 m A h g   ‐‐‐‐‐‐  [161]  Nb‐doped WO3 film  1000 cycles, ▲T 76.2% retained, C  −1 Sol‐gel  ECB  61.7% (633 nm)  3.6, 2.1  49.7  74.4 m A h g   [170]  75.8% retained  Mo‐doped WO3  56.7% (750 nm),  3.2, 2.6 (750  123.5 (750  3500 cycles, ▲T 57.3% retained;  −1 Hydrothermal  ECB  55.89 m A h g   nanowire arrays [171]  83.0% (1600 nm)  nm)  nm)  4 A/g, 5500 cycles, C 38.2% retained  0.25 mA/cm , 117.1  4000 s, ▲T no obvious change  Amorphous Mo‐ Electrodeposition  ECSC  83.3% (633 nm)  2.1, 2.0  86.1  mF/cm  (334.6 m F  doped WO3 films [162]  −1 1500 cycles, C 83% retained  g )    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  28  of  42  PANI/WO3  Electropolymeriz 1000 cycles, charge density did not  ECSC  35.3% (633 nm)  13.6, 9.9  98.4  5 mV/s, 0.025 F/cm   nanocomposite [172]  ation + annealing  change too much  Color changes:  brownish green‐ WO3/PANI  0.02 mA/cm , 4.1  Chemical bath  ECSC  transparent‐light  ‐‐‐, ‐‐‐  ‐‐‐  800 cycles, C 38% retained  nanocomposite [173]  mF/cm   green‐brownish  green  Solvothermal +  Urchin‐like  −1 electropolymeriza ECB  45% (700nm)  1.9, 1.5  ‐‐‐  ‐‐‐, 831 mA h g   1200 cycles, 516 mA h/g  WO3@PANI [174]  tion  Honeycombed porous  Hydrothermal +  poly(5‐ 26% (505nm); 46%  electrochemical  ECSC  ‐‐‐, ‐‐‐  137 ‐‐‐, 34.1 mF/cm   5000 cycles, C 93% retained  formylindole)/WO (745nm)  3  polymerization  nanocomposites [175]    Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 692  29  of  42  Nanostructures  can  significantly  facilitate  the  electrochemical  activities  of  the  electrode. For example, by hydrothermal method, He et al. [167] made different tungsten  oxide  nanostructures  including  nanospindles,  nanopetals,  nanosheets,  and  nanobricks.  Among  them,  nanosheets  had  better  EC  performance  of  wider  optical  contrast,  faster  switching speed, higher coloration efficiency and capacitive performance of greater areal  capacitance  owing  to  its  significantly  increased  active  sites,  and  facilitated  Li   ions  diffusion  by the large  surface area  and