Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Antibacterial Activity of Some Flavonoids and Organic Acids Widely Distributed in Plants

Antibacterial Activity of Some Flavonoids and Organic Acids Widely Distributed in Plants Article  Antibacterial Activity of Some Flavonoids and  Organic Acids Widely Distributed in Plants  1 2 3,   Artur Adamczak  , Marcin Ożarowski   and Tomasz M. Karpiński  *   Department of Botany, Breeding and Agricultural Technology of Medicinal Plants, Institute of Natural  Fibres and Medicinal Plants, Kolejowa 2, 62‐064 Plewiska, Poland; artur.adamczak@iwnirz.pl    Department of Biotechnology, Institute of Natural Fibres and Medicinal Plants, Wojska Polskiego 71b,   60‐630 Poznań, Poland; marcin.ozarowski@iwnirz.pl    Department of Medical Microbiology, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Wieniawskiego 3,   61‐712 Poznań, Poland  *  Correspondence: tkarpin@ump.edu.pl  Received: 21 November 2019; Accepted: 27 December 2019; Published: 31 December 2019  Abstract: Among natural substances widespread in fruits, vegetables, spices, and medicinal plants,  flavonoids and organic acids belong to the promising groups of bioactive compounds with strong  antioxidant and  anti‐inflammatory properties. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the  antibacterial activity of 13 common flavonoids (flavones, flavonols, flavanones) and 6 organic acids  (aliphatic  and  aromatic  acids).  The  minimal  inhibitory  concentrations  (MICs)  of  selected  plant  substances were determined by the micro‐dilution method using clinical strains of four species of  pathogenic  bacteria.  All  tested  compounds  showed  antimicrobial  properties,  but  their  biological  activity was moderate or relatively low. Bacterial growth was most strongly inhibited by salicylic  acid (MIC = 250–500 μg/mL). These compounds were generally more active against Gram‐negative  bacteria: Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa than Gram‐positive ones: Enterococcus faecalis  and Staphylococcus aureus. An analysis of the antibacterial effect of flavone, chrysin, apigenin, and  luteolin showed that the presence of hydroxyl groups in the phenyl rings A and B usually did not  influence  on  the  level  of  their  activity.  A  significant  increase  in  the  activity  of  the  hydroxy  derivatives of flavone was observed only for S. aureus. Similarly, the presence and position of the  sugar group in the flavone glycosides generally had no effect on the MIC values.  Keywords: kaempferol; naringin; orientin; rutin; vitexin; chlorogenic acid; citric acid; malic acid;  quinic acid; rosmarinic acid  1. Introduction  Screening biological studies of chemical compounds of natural origin allow for assessment of  their activity and determine further research stages in order to search for new therapeutic solutions  based  on  active  compounds  known  in  plants.  This  is  especially  important  during  the  observed  increasing resistance of bacteria and fungi to antibiotics. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious  threat to human health, but also to crops and animals. MDR is a growing challenge in medicine.  Recently, several multinational studies have been carried out to determine the prevalence of herbal  medicine use in infections due to pathogenic microorganisms [1,2]. It is considered that extracts of  medicinal plants can be an alternative source of resistance modifying substances [2]. It is well known  that plant extracts and other herbal products are complex mixtures containing the wide variety of  primary and secondary metabolites, and their action may be the result of the synergy of different  chemical  components.  Moreover,  these  extracts  may  show  various  mechanisms  of  biological  and  pharmacological activity, i.e., ability to bind to protein domains, modulation of the immune response,  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109; doi:10.3390/jcm9010109  www.mdpi.com/journal/jcm  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  2  of  16  mitosis, apoptosis, and signal transduction [2]. However, it should be noted that plants interact with  the environment and other organisms, therefore their chemical composition and the level of active  substances  can  be  very  diverse  [3,4].  In  addition,  the  manufacturing  process  of  herbal  medicinal  products is very complex because it encompasses non‐standardized processes like the cultivation of  plants, obtaining the vegetable raw material from various parts of the world, preparing of extract,  and producing a product in accordance with local guidelines of the good manufacturing practice.  Therefore, it can be concluded that using pure chemical compounds of natural origin would be an  interesting complementary option due to their easier therapeutic dosage, the study of mechanisms of  the pharmacological action and monitoring of their side effects.  A lot of widespread plant substances, including alkaloids, organosulfur compounds, phenolic  acids, flavonoids, carotenoids, coumarins, terpenes, tannins, and some primary metabolites (amino  acids, peptides, organic acids) exhibit antimicrobial properties [1,5–8]. Among them, flavonoids are  a promising group of bioactive substances with low systemic toxicity. Natural flavonols, flavones,  flavanones, and other compounds of this class belong to the common secondary metabolites found  in  various  fruits,  vegetables,  and  medicinal  plants  [9]  showing  strong  antioxidant  and  anti‐ inflammatory  properties  [10,11].  Dietary  polyphenols  such  as  flavonoids  and  phenolic  acids,  consumed in large quantities in foods of plant origin, exhibit a number of beneficial effects and play  an important role in the prevention of chronic and degenerative diseases. Not only their antioxidant  and  anti‐inflammatory  activities,  but  also  neuroprotective,  anticancer,  immunomodulatory,  antidiabetic,  and  anti‐adipogenic  properties  have  been  shown  [12,13].  Biological  availability  of  dietary polyphenols is low as compared with micro‐ and macronutrients. Their absorption in the  small  intestine  amounts  only  about  5–10%.  However,  recent  studies  showed  that  these  phytochemicals exhibit prebiotic properties and antimicrobial activity against pathogenic intestinal  microflora [13].  Flavonoids  selected  for  our  microbiological  tests  are  presented  in  Figure  1.  In  the  large  quantities, they occur in stems and leaves, flowers as well as fruits of the species from the families of  Apiaceae,  Asteraceae,  Betulaceae,  Brassicaceae,  Ericaceae,  Fabaceae,  Hypericaceae,  Lamiaceae,  Liliaceae, Passifloraceae, Polygonaceae, Primulaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, Rubiaceae, Rutaceae,  Scrophulariaceae,  Tiliaceae,  and  Violaceae.  Two  flavonols:  quercetin,  kaempferol,  and  flavones:  apigenin,  luteolin  belong  to  the  most  ubiquitous  plant  flavonoids  [14].  A  glycoside  form  of  quercetin—rutin  (sophorin,  rutoside)  is  present  in  the  highest  concentrations  in  buckwheat  (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench), rue (Ruta graveolens L.), flower buds of Styphnolobium japonicum (L.)  Schott (Sophora japonica L.), apricots, peaches, and citrus fruits [15,16]. Apigenin derivatives, such as  vitexin, isovitexin, and vitexin 2″‐O‐rhamnoside constitute the main bioactive compounds of leaves  and flowers of hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) [17]. The 8‐ and 6‐C‐glucosides of luteolin: orientin and  isoorientin are reported from different crop plants, including buckwheat, corn silk (Zea mays L.), acai  fruits  (Euterpe  oleracea  Mart.,  E.  precatoria  Mart.),  and  Moso  bamboo  leaves  (Phyllostachys  edulis/Carrière/J.Houz.) [18,19]. In turn, passion fruits (Passiflora spp.), skullcap roots (Scutellaria spp.)  as well as honey and propolis are the main natural sources of chrysin [20–23]. Naringin is a flavanone  glycoside isolated from grapes and citrus fruits, and it imparts a bitter taste to grapefruit juice [24].      Chrysin  Flavone  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  3  of  16      Apigenin  Luteolin      Vitexin  Orientin  Vitexin 2”‐O‐rhamnoside      Isovitexin  Isoorientin  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  4  of  16      Kaempferol  Quercetin  Naringin  Rutin  Figure 1. Chemical structures of flavonoids tested in the present research.  In addition to flavonoids, a lot of organic acids: both aliphatic and aromatic ones, especially  phenolics are the important bioactive compounds of edible and medicinal plants (Figure 2). Among  non‐aromatic, short‐chain hydroxy acids, malic, citric, and quinic acids belong to the most abundant  substances with a key role in plant metabolism and physiology. Malic and citric acids are mainly  produced in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (Krebs cycle) and, to a lesser degree, in the glyoxylate cycle,  while  quinic  acid  is  a  byproduct  of  the  shikimic  acid  pathway  [4].  High  accumulation  of  these  compounds  is  observed  in  various  berry  fruits  of  wild  and  cultivated  plants  from  the  Ericaceae,  Rosaceae, and  Grossulariaceae families,  including  cranberry (Vaccinium  macrocarpon Aiton and  V.  oxycoccos  L.),  bilberry  (V.  myrtillus  L.),  blueberry  (V.  corymbosum  L.),  blackberry  (Rubus  spp.),  raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.), black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa/Michx./Elliott), red currant (Ribes  rubrum L.), black currant (Ribes nigrum L.), and many others [25–30]. For example, the total content of  citric, malic, and quinic acids in fruits of European cranberry can reach almost 37% of dry matter [31].  Citric acid  Malic acid  Quinic acid  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  5  of  16     Chlorogenic acid  Rosmarinic acid  Salicylic acid  Figure 2. Chemical structures of organic acids tested in the present research.  Berries  are  also  a  rich  source  of  hydroxycinnamic  acids  and  their  derivatives,  including  chlorogenic (5‐O‐caffeoylquinic) and neochlorogenic (3‐O‐caffeoylquinic) acids, which are the esters  formed  between  caffeic  (3,4‐dihydroxycinnamic)  and  quinic  acids  [32,33].  A  great  amount  of  chlorogenic acid isomers has been found, among others, in yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis A.St‐Hil.),  coffee (Coffea spp.), and tea plant (Camellia sinensis/L./Kuntze) [34]. In turn, rosmarinic acid, an ester  of  caffeic  and  3,4‐dihydroxyphenyllactic  acids,  was  isolated  for  the  first  time  from  the  rosemary  leaves (Rosmarinus officinalis L.). It commonly occurs in many aromatic and medicinal plants of the  Lamiaceae  family,  especially  mint  (Mentha  spp.)  and  thyme  (Thymus  spp.)  species,  lemon  balm  (Melissa officinalis L.), common sage (Salvia officinalis L.), oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), and sweet  basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) [35–37]. Another well‐known secondary metabolite, the phytohormone  salicylic acid (SA), is a key signaling compound that participates in the plant response to pathogens,  herbivores, and abiotic stress [38]. Natural salicylates such as salicylic acid and salicin (salicyl alcohol  glucoside) were found in large amounts in the willow bark (Salix spp.), the buds of black poplar  (Populus nigra L.), elm leaves (Ulmus spp.), and meadowsweet herb (Filipendula ulmaria/L./Maxim.)  [39,40].  Our studies were focused on the estimation of antibacterial activity of selected flavonoids and  organic acids widespread in fruits, vegetables, spices, and popular medicinal plants which are very  often  used  for  the  prevention  and  treatment  of  various  diseases.  For  example,  many  herbal  preparations  utilized  as  natural  diuretics,  and  plant  extracts  with  other  main  pharmacological  activities  (i.e.,  drugs  against  cardiovascular  diseases,  sedatives,  anti‐inflammatory  agents)  exhibit  additional beneficial effects by the antimicrobial action [41,42]. Recent data show that flavonoids have  protective potential against cutaneous inflammatory reactions and affect wound healing [43,44]. In  addition, organic acids (especially citric acid) seem to be of significant importance in the antimicrobial  activity and health of the skin [45,46]. In the present studies, we tested the biological activity of chosen  flavonoids and organic acids against four widespread pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus  faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. These Gram‐positive and Gram‐negative bacteria  can  cause  many  diseases  in  humans,  including  opportunistic  infections  and  belong  to  the  most  common etiological factors of the skin and wound infections [47,48].  Microbiological screening tests included 19 plant metabolites from the various flavonoid classes:  flavones, flavonols, flavanones, and simple organic acids: aliphatic and aromatic ones. The chosen  flavonoids differed in the number of hydroxyl groups on the aromatic rings as well as the presence  and position of the sugar group, which gave the opportunity to test the effect of these parameters on  the biological activity of the natural compounds.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Chemicals  Chemicals used in this study were purchased from Merck (Sigma‐Aldrich, Supelco, Poland).  Plant compounds selected for the microbiological tests are presented in Table 1. All substances were  dissolved  in  20%  water  solution  of  dimethyl  sulfoxide  DMSO  (Sigma‐Aldrich,  Poland)  in  a  final  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  6  of  16  concentration of 1 mg/mL. Additionally, DMSO was used as a negative control, while two antibiotics,  ciprofloxacin  (Sigma,  cat.  no.  17850)  and  gentamicin  sulfate  (Sigma‐Aldrich,  cat.  no.  G1914)  as  positives.  Table 1. Plant pure substances used in the microbiological assays.  No  Merck (Sigma‐Aldrich, Supelco)  CAS No  PubChem CID  Purity  1  Apigenin  520‐36‐5  5280443  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  2  Chrysin  480‐40‐0  5281607  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  3  Flavone  525‐82‐6  10680  ≥99.0%  4  Isoorientin  4261‐42‐1  114776  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  5  Isovitexin  38953‐85‐4  162350  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  6  Kaempferol  520‐18‐3  5280863  ≥97.0% (HPLC)  7  Luteolin  491‐70‐3  5280445  ≥97.0% (HPLC)  8  Naringin  10236‐47‐2  442428  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  9  Orientin  28608‐75‐5  5281675  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  10  Quercetin  117‐39‐5  5280343  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  11  Rutin  153‐18‐4  5280805  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  12  Vitexin  3681‐93‐4  5280441  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  13  Vitexin 2″‐O‐rhamnoside  64820‐99‐1  5282151  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  14  Chlorogenic acid  327‐97‐9  1794427  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  15  Citric acid  77‐92‐9  311  ≤100%  16  Malic acid  6915‐15‐7  525  ≤100%  17  Quinic acid  77‐95‐2  6508  analytical standard  18  Rosmarinic acid  20283‐92‐5  5281792  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  19  Salicylic acid  69‐72‐7  338  ≥99.0%  2.2. Bacterial Strains and Antimicrobial Activity  In the in vitro tests, there were investigated clinical isolates of two Gram‐positive (Staphylococcus  aureus, Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram‐negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa). For  each species, four strains obtained from the collection of the Department of Medical Microbiology at  Poznań University of Medical Sciences (Poland) were tested. None of them were multidrug‐resistant.  The species of bacteria were grown at 35 °C for 24 h, in tryptone soy agar (TSA; Graso, Poland).  The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of selected plant substances were determined by  the  micro‐dilution  method  using  the  96‐well  plates  (Nest  Scientific  Biotechnology).  Studies  were  conducted  according  to  the  Clinical  and  Laboratory  Standards  Institute  (CLSI)  [49],  European  Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) recommendations [50], and as described  in our previous publications [48,51]. Primarily, 90 μL of Mueller–Hinton broth (Graso, Poland) was  placed in each well. Serial dilutions of each of the substances were performed so that concentrations in  the  range  of  15.6–1000 μg/mL  were  obtained.  In  the  initial  tests  of  antibacterial  activity  of  phytochemicals,  the  lowest  concentration  amounted  to  1.95 μg/mL  (Figure  3),  while  for  positive  controls (antibiotics) it was 0.98 μg/mL. The inoculums were adjusted to contain approximately 10   CFU/mL bacteria. 10 μL of the proper inoculums were added to the wells, obtaining concentration 10   CFU/mL. The plates were incubated at 35 °C for 24 h, then 20 μL of 1% MTT water solution (3‐(4,5‐ Dimethyl‐2‐thiazolyl)‐2,5‐diphenyl‐2H‐tetrazolium bromide, Sigma‐Aldrich) was added to the wells.  Next, the plates were incubated 2–4 h at 37 °C. This assay is based on the reduction of yellow tetrazolium  salt  (MTT)  to  a  soluble  purple  formazan  product  [48].  The  MIC  value  was  taken  as  the  lowest  concentration of the substance that inhibited any visible bacterial growth. The analyses were repeated  three times.  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  7  of  16  Figure  3.  The  minimal  inhibitory  concentrations  (MICs)  of  selected  plant  substances  against  Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain according to the micro‐dilution method.  In our investigations, we adopted the range of tested concentrations of phytochemicals for the  MICs between 15.6 and 1000 μg/mL, although some authors determine the antimicrobial activity of  natural compounds at the level of 2000–4000 μg/mL or more [52–54]. However, in our opinion, such  high values indicate a very weak effect of these substances. During the description of the results, it was  taken that the MIC = 250 μg/mL shows a relatively high antibacterial activity of plant chemicals, while  the MICs = 500 and 1000 μg/mL mean moderate and low effects, respectively.  3. Results  Our research exhibited antibacterial properties of all tested flavonoids and organic acids, but  their activity was quite diverse. These compounds were generally more active against Gram‐negative  than Gram‐positive bacteria. The following tendency of microbial sensitivity to plant substances was  observed: E. coli > P. aeruginosa > E. faecalis > S. aureus (Table 2). Salicylic acid showed the highest  biological  effect  on  all  bacterial  species  (MIC  =  250–500 μg/mL).  However,  other  chemicals  demonstrated a similar activity, especially against E. coli and P. aeruginosa (MIC = 500 μg/mL). Among  19  investigated  phytochemicals,  only  three:  kaempferol,  quercetin,  and  chlorogenic  acid  had  no  significant influence on P. aeruginosa, while up to 10 compounds were relatively inactive against S.  aureus (MIC > 1000 μg/mL). It was interesting that the individual strains of a given bacterial species  most often did not show differences in the sensitivity to one plant substance. Only salicylic acid,  rosmarinic acid, and apigenin exhibited differentiating effects on individual strains.  Table 2. Antibacterial activity of selected plant substances against Gram (+) and Gram (−) bacteria.  Tested Bacteria    Staphylococcus  Enterococcus  Pseudomonas  Plant Substance  Escherichia coli  aureus  faecalis  aeruginosa  MIC (μg/mL)  Kaempferol  >1000  >1000  500  >1000  Quercetin  >1000  >1000  500  >1000  Rutin  1000  1000  500  500  Naringin  >1000  1000  500  500  Flavone  >1000  500  500  500  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  8  of  16  Chrysin  500  1000  500  500  Apigenin  500, 1000 (3x)  1000  500  500  Vitexin  >1000  1000  500  500  Isovitexin  >1000  1000  500  500  Vitexin 2″‐O‐rhamnoside  >1000  1000  500  500  Luteolin  500  1000  500  500  Orientin  500  1000  500  500  Isoorientin  500  1000  500  500  Citric acid  >1000  1000  500  500  Malic acid  1000  1000  500  500  Quinic acid  >1000  1000  500  500  Chlorogenic acid  1000  1000  500  >1000  Rosmarinic acid  >1000  1000  500  500 (2x), 1000 (2x)  Salicylic acid  250 (2x), 500 (2x)  500  250 (3x), 500  500  Median  >1000  1000  500  500  20% DMSO (negative control)  >1000  >1000  >1000  >1000  Ciprofloxacin (positive)  <1  <1  <1  <1  Gentamicin sulfate (positive)  <1  <1–62.5  <1–3.9  <1  Although  flavonol  aglycones  kaempferol  and  quercetin  displayed  a  moderate  activity  only  against E. coli, quercetin glycoside rutin demonstrated influence on all strains tested (MIC = 500–1000  μg/mL). A similar activity level was found for the glycosides from the other classes of flavonoids:  flavanones  (naringin)  and  flavones  (vitexin,  isovitexin,  vitexin  2″‐O‐rhamnoside,  orientin,  isoorientin).  Differences  were  determined  only  in  the  case  of  S.  aureus.  Naringin,  vitexin  and  its  derivatives  showed  no  significant  activity,  while  orientin  and  isoorientin  were  clearly  stronger  antibacterial agents than rutin.  Among organic acids, the highest variability in the microbiological effect was found against S.  aureus and P. aeruginosa. Some metabolites such as citric, quinic, and rosmarinic acids for S. aureus,  and also chlorogenic acid for P. aeruginosa were relatively inactive. The aliphatic acids: citric, malic  and quinic ones showed the same level of activity within individual species of E. faecalis, E. coli, and  P. aeruginosa (MIC = 500–1000 μg/mL). In turn, phenolic compounds: chlorogenic, rosmarinic, and  salicylic acids exhibited variation within all bacterial species with the MIC values from 250 to above  1000 μg/mL.  4. Discussion  In recent years, a rapid increase in the number of studies concerning the antibacterial properties  of  plant  extracts  rich  in  phenolic  compounds,  including  flavonoids  and  phenolic  acids  has  been  observed. However, due to the enormous wealth of species and natural substances, the degree of  their examination is very diverse and still insufficient. Particularly, works on the antibacterial activity  of  individual  pure  compounds  are  relatively  few.  There  is  a  small  number  of  microbiological  investigations describing the effects of some common flavonoid glycosides such as vitexin [55–58],  isovitexin [59,60], vitexin 2″‐O‐rhamnoside [61], orientin [62,63], and isoorientin [56,60,62].  In  addition,  literature  data  are  difficult  to  compare  due  to  the  use  of  various  methods  for  assessing antibacterial activity, different solvents, and the origin and purity of test compounds, often  isolated from various plant extracts [55,57,59,60,62–65]. Antimicrobial properties of natural chemicals  were described not only by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) [33,54,57,62,64,66–72] and  by the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) [72], but also by the agar well or disc‐diffusion  methods  [59,60,63,65].  Some  authors  expressed  results  as  the  IC50  or  MIC80  values  [33,67,73].  Moreover, the plant substances were tested in various concentrations. The kind of solvent used for  the dissolution of pure compounds is the next important point in the assessment of in vitro activity.  Although  most  authors  utilized dimethyl sulfoxide,  sometimes they did not give its concentration  [59,62,63,65] or it is 100% DMSO [54], which may affect the level of antimicrobial activity of the tested  solutions. The other solvents used were, for example, acetone [67], chloroform [59], Mueller Hinton II  broth [68], and water [71]. In several cases, there was no information about dissolving procedures  [57,58,60]. In this context, there is still a need for extensive screening studies that would compare the  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  9  of  16  activity of a large number of plant metabolites against the same bacterial strains by a standardized  method.  Our investigations exhibited moderate antibacterial properties of tested flavonoids and organic  acids against clinical strains of Gram‐negative pathogens: E. coli and P. aeruginosa (MIC = 500 μg/mL).  Among 19 selected plant substances, only three: kaempferol, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid were  inactive against P. aeruginosa at all concentrations tested (15.6–1000 μg/mL). However, for up to 10  compounds,  no  significant  activity  was  found  against  the  Gram‐positive  bacteria  S.  aureus.  Additionally, another microorganism from this group E. faecalis showed low sensitivity (MIC = 1000  μg/mL) to most analyzed metabolites (Table 2). The above‐described observations confirm the results  of works which indicate a higher activity of natural plant substances, including flavonoids, against  some Gram‐negative bacteria than Gram‐positive ones, although it is usually considered that this  regularity  is  the  opposite  [48,55].  The  general  tendency  of  bacterial  sensitivity  to  selected  plant  substances was observed as follows: E. coli > P. aeruginosa > E. faecalis > S. aureus (Table 2). Some  screening studies showed the greater activity of alkaloids, flavonoids, and phenolic acids especially  against P. aeruginosa, and also E. coli than S. aureus [5,55]. However, this relationship seems to have  significant limitations and requires further detailed research. For example, all strains of S. aureus, E.  coli,  and  P.  aeruginosa  tested  by  us  had  the  same  level  of sensitivity  to  flavones  chrysin,  luteolin,  orientin, isoorientin, and some clinical isolates of them to apigenin and salicylic acid. No differences  in the inhibitory potency of bacterial growth of above‐mentioned species were previously reported,  among others, for luteolin, orientin, isoorientin [62], and in the case of S. aureus and E. coli for chrysin  [67], luteolin [74], and glycosides of quercetin hyperoside and rutin [72].  Numerous studies allow to state that in antibacterial mechanisms of flavonoids are included  mainly:  inhibition  of  synthesis  of  nucleic  acid,  inhibition  of  cytoplasmic  membrane  function  by  influence the biofilm formation, porins, permeability, and by interaction with some crucial enzymes  [6,8,75,76]. It was shown that apigenin inhibits the DNA gyrase of E. coli [77], and has inhibitory  effects on the formation of E. coli biofilm [78]. Recently, a liposomal formulation of apigenin was  examined, and it was observed increasing of its antibacterial property by the interaction of apigenin  liposomes with the membrane of tested bacteria resulted in the lysis of the bacterial cells. Comparison  of results exhibited much greater efficiency of liposomal apigenin against both Gram‐positive and  Gram‐negative bacteria: B. subtilis (MIC = 4 μg/mL), S. aureus (MIC = 8 μg/mL), and E. coli (MIC = 16  μg/mL), P. aeruginosa (MIC = 64 μg/mL) [68]. Other flavones, including apigenin C‐glucosides such  as  vitexin and isovitexin, have also  been tested in order to study their effect on bacterial surface  hydrophobicity  and  biofilm  formation  [57–59].  Das  et  al.  [58]  reported  that  vitexin  reduces  the  hydrophobicity of cell surface and membrane permeability of S. aureus at the sub‐MIC dose of 126  μg/mL.  This  flavone  down‐regulated  the  icaAB  and  agrAC  gene  expression  showing  antibiofilm  activity and bactericidal effect. In similar work, Das et al. [57] demonstrated that vitexin exerts the  MIC of 260 μg/mL against P. aeruginosa, and exhibits moderate antibiofilm activity. In turn, isovitexin  (200–500 μg/mL)  decreased  the  adhesion  of  methicillin‐sensitive  S.  aureus  ATCC  29213,  and  simultaneously increased the adhesion of two strains of E. coli [59]. Currently, it was shown that  isovitexin has the potent antibacterial properties described as the diameter of the zone of growth  inhibition (ZOI) for B. subtilis (19.5 mm), P. aeruginosa (17.5 mm), E. coli (14.1 mm), and Staphylococcus  aureus (12.8 mm). The even stronger activity was found for isoorientin (luteolin C‐glucoside), and it  was as follows: B. subtilis (20.1 mm), P. aeruginosa (19.1 mm), S. aureus (18.7 mm), and E. coli (14.8 mm)  [60].  Microbiological literature provides interesting data on the mechanism of action of two main  flavonols:  kaempferol  and  quercetin.  It  was  shown  that  quercetin  increases  the  cytoplasmic  membrane  permeability  of  S.  pyogenes  which  resulted  in  the  inhibitory  influence  on  this  Gram‐ positive bacterium at the MIC value of 128 μg/mL [79]. Moreover, in this study, the synergistic effect  of quercetin with antibiotic ceftazidime was observed. Barbieri et al. [6] concluded that this flavonol  is active not only against Gram‐positive pathogens: S. aureus, S. haemolyticus, and S. pyogenes, but also  against Gram‐negative ones: E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Additionally, Betts et al. [80] showed a strongly  inhibiting  effect  against  methicillin‐resistant  S.  aureus,  which  was  significantly  increased  in  the  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  10  of  16  presence of epigallocatechin gallate. Studies of the mechanism of antimicrobial action allowed to state  that quercetin diacyl glycosides show dual inhibition of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV [81]. In  turn, our investigations exhibited the moderate effect of these plant metabolites against E. coli (MIC  = 500 μg/mL), and lack of significant activity in the case of S. aureus (MIC > 1000 μg/mL). Research of  Chen and Huang [82] concerning quercetin and kaempferol reported inhibition of the interaction of  DNA  B  helicase  of  K.  pneumoniae  with  deoxynucleotide  triphosphates  (dNTPs).  Further  study  showed  that  the  ATPase  activity  of  this  helicase  KpDnaB  was  decreased  to  75%  and  65%  in  the  presence of quercetin and kaempferol, respectively [83]. In the next work, Huang et al. [84] observed  that  kaempferol  inhibits  the  DNA  PriA  helicase  of  S.  aureus,  and  these  results  showed  that  the  concentration of phosphate from ATP hydrolysis by this DNA helicase was decreased to 37% in the  presence of 35 μM kaempferol. Thus, it was summarized that kaempferol can bind to DNA helicase  and  then  inhibit  its  ATPase  activity  and  this  is  a  new  mechanism  of  action  for  this  chemical  compound.  According  to  the  results,  this  flavonol  may  be  taken  into  consideration  as  an  active  natural molecule in the development of new antibiotics against S. aureus [84]. Currently, Huang [73]  demonstrated the inhibitory effect of kaempferol on the activity of a dihydropyrimidinase from P.  aeruginosa with the IC50 value of 50 ± 2 μM.  Nowadays, it is believed that the structure‐activity relationship in the antimicrobial effect of  flavonoids should be further examined because it is a very large group of compounds, and many  issues have not yet been clarified. Xie et al. [75] concluded that hydroxyl groups at special positions  on the aromatic rings of flavonoids improve the antibacterial effect. Flavonoids have the C6‐C3‐C6  carbon structure consisting of two phenyl rings (A and B) and a heterocyclic ring (C). Generally, it  was  observed  that  at  least  one  hydroxyl  group  in  the  ring  A  (especially  at  C‐7)  is  vital  for  the  antibacterial  activity  of  flavones,  and  in  another  position  such  as  C‐5  and  C‐6  can  increase  this  biological effect [85]. In this context, it is interesting to compare our results regarding the antibacterial  activity of flavones with the hydroxyl groups at C‐5 and C‐7 (chrysin, apigenin, luteolin, and their  glycosides) and flavone devoid of them. Just like other chemicals from this flavonoid class, flavone  showed moderate inhibitory influence on the growth of E. coli and P. aeruginosa (MIC = 500 μg/mL).  The same level of flavone activity was found against E. faecalis, and it was the highest value among  the  flavonoids  tested.  Only  against  S.  aureus,  the  above‐mentioned  substance  was  inactive  at  concentrations  tested  (15.6–1000 μg/mL).  Furthermore,  we  observed  that  a  number  of  hydroxyl  groups at two aromatic rings do not correspond with higher antimicrobial activity of flavonoids, i.e.,  quercetin has five hydroxyl groups, but it was not active against E. faecalis, S. aureus, and P. aeruginosa.  In addition, some studies displayed a low effect of quercetin on B. subtilis, E. cloacae, E. coli, and K.  pneumoniae [86]. The structure‐activity relationships of flavonoids were discussed by Xie et al. [87],  and it was summarized that two hydroxyl substituents on C‐5 and C‐7 of ring A of quercetin, rutin,  and naringenin lead to their antibacterial activities. Moreover, it was found that the saturation of the  C2=C3 double bond (in naringin) increased the antibacterial activity. However, in our study naringin  was the most active against P. aeruginosa only in comparison with kaempferol and quercetin. On the  other side, a recent study showed that the presence of glycosyl conjugated groups to polyphenols  may reduce antibacterial activity [88]. We showed that glycosides of flavonoids (vitexin, vitexin 2″‐ O‐rhamnoside, isovitexin, orientin, isoorientin, naringin, rutin) have some antibacterial effects (Table  2). The aglycone apigenin exhibited higher activity against S. aureus in comparison with its glycosides  vitexin,  isovitexin,  and  vitexin  2″‐O‐rhamnoside,  however  the  aglycon  luteolin  had  the  same  antibacterial effects on all bacterial strains as its C‐glucosides orientin and isoorientin.  According to the literature, the level of sensitivity of the bacterial species studied by us to plant  substances is very diverse and strongly depends not only on the type of active compound but also on  the selected strains, as shown by comparative analyses in this regard [5,53]. It may also affect large  discrepancies  in  the  results  between  individual  investigations.  Some  literature  data  suggest  that  standard strains are generally much more sensitive to antibiotics and natural plant compounds than  current clinical isolates. For example, the MIC values of quercetin, apigenin, naringin, chlorogenic,  and quinic acids for E. coli ATCC 35218, P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145, S. aureus ATCC 25923, and E.  faecalis ATCC 29212 reached 2–16 μg/mL, while for the clinical strains it ranged between 32 and 128  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  11  of  16  μg/mL  or  above  this  [5].  In  turn,  research  conducted  by  Su  et  al.  [53]  showed  a  slightly  higher  sensitivity of some clinical isolates of methicillin‐resistant S. aureus to luteolin and quercetin (MIC =  31.2–62.5 μg/mL) than methicillin‐sensitive strains (MIC = 125 μg/mL). In the study of Morimoto et  al. [89], quinolone‐resistant S. aureus Mu50 was much more sensitive to apigenin (MIC = 4 μg/mL)  than quinolone‐susceptible S. aureus strain FDA 209P (MIC > 128 μg/mL). Compared to the above‐ cited works [5,89], it was interesting that apigenin and chlorogenic acid were practically inactive  (MIC > 4000 μg/mL) against all 34 strains of S. aureus tested by Su et al. [53]. Our investigations  exhibited the moderate or weak activity of these two compounds against S. aureus (MIC = 500–1000  μg/mL). A recent review of the literature [33] showed that chlorogenic acid has a broad spectrum of  antimicrobial activity, but its effect is very diverse. This phenolic acid strongly inhibited the growth  of E. faecalis (MIC = 64 μg/mL), while it was inactive against P. aeruginosa (MIC80 = 10,000 μg/mL). For  S. aureus and E. coli, its MIC values ranged from 40–80 to 10,000 μg/mL. The above data are largely  consistent  with  the  results  of  the  current  work  (Table  2).  We  exhibited  the  moderate  activity  of  chlorogenic acid against E. coli (MIC = 500 μg/mL) and confirmed the lack of significant influence of  this substance on P. aeruginosa at the concentrations tested (MIC > 1000 μg/mL).  In addition to chlorogenic acid, we also studied the biological influence of other phenolic acids:  rosmarinic  and  salicylic  ones.  In  addition,  their  antibacterial  activity  was  compared  with  some  aliphatic acids: citric, malic, and quinic. Generally, there were no clear differences in the activity of  these two groups of substances. However, the simple phenolic compound salicylic acid showed the  highest activity with the MIC values of 250–500 μg/mL. Many studies proved that rosmarinic acid  has an antimicrobial effect on Gram‐positive and Gram‐negative bacteria [65,71,90]. Sometimes, the  level  of  this  activity  was  not  high.  Recently,  Akhtar  et  al.  [65]  indicated  the  moderate  growth  inhibition zones of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa (13 mm in diameter), S. aureus (12 mm), Proteus  vulgaris  (11  mm),  and  E.  coli  (10  mm)  at  1 μg/mL  concentration  of  rosmarinic  acid.  Similarly,  Matejczyk et al. [71] observed a not very strong antibacterial effect of this phenolic acid on E. coli  (MIC > 250 μg/mL), Bacillus sp. (MIC > 500 μg/mL), S. epidermidis (MIC > 500 μg/mL), and S. pyogenes  (MIC  >  500 μg/mL)  in  comparison  with  an  antibiotic  kanamycin  (MIC  >  100 μg/mL).  In  turn,  Ekambaram et al. [69] demonstrated the MIC values of rosmarinic acid against S. aureus and MRSA  on the level of 800 and 10,000 μg/mL, respectively. Blaskovich et al. [54] carried out experimental  research and made a critical review of the antimicrobial activity of salicylic acid. Results of these  studies  demonstrated  that  salicylic  acid  was  practically  inactive  against  various  bacterial  strains,  including  B.  subtilis  ATCC  6633,  E.  faecalis  ATCC  29212,  S.  aureus,  MSSA  ATCC  25923,  and  S.  pneumoniae ATCC 33400 (MIC = 32,000 μg/mL). The antibacterial properties are relatively well known  for  small  aliphatic  molecules  tested  by  us:  citric,  malic,  and  quinic  acids  [91–93].  Investigations  concerning the effect of quinic acid on cellular functions of S. aureus demonstrated that this organic  acid could significantly decrease the intracellular pH and ATP concentration, and also reduce the  DNA content [93]. Citric acid was previously shown to have the MICs of 900 μg/mL for S. aureus and  1500 μg/mL for E. coli, and to be very effective in the treatment of chronic wound infections in a dose  of 3 g of citric acid dissolved in 100 mL of distilled water [91]. In turn, Gao et al. [85] demonstrated  no clear activity of citric and malic acids against E. coli (MIC = 1667 and 2000 μg/mL, respectively) B.  subtilis (MIC = 2000 μg/mL), and S. suis (MIC = 8000 and 6667 μg/mL). However, Jensen et al. [92]  exhibited  that  cranberry  juice  and  its  main  compounds  (citric,  malic,  quinic,  and  shikimic  acids)  reduce E. coli colonization of the bladder. These organic acids decreased bacterial levels when they  were administered together or in a combination of malic acid and citric or quinic ones. Our research  confirmed the antibacterial activity of citric, malic, and quinic acids not only against E. coli (MIC =  500 μg/mL), but also against P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis (Table 2).  5. Conclusions  Our  research  confirmed  the  antibacterial  activity  of  all  tested  plant  compounds.  With  the  exception of kaempferol and quercetin, they showed a biological effect against clinical strains of 3–4  bacterial species. Microbiological screening of flavonoids and organic acids allowed to exhibit some  interesting details and relationships. First of all, these metabolites were generally more potent against  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  12  of  16  Gram‐negative bacteria: E. coli and P. aeruginosa than Gram‐positive ones: E. faecalis and S. aureus. On  the  other  hand,  the  comparative  study  of  antibacterial  activity  of  flavone,  chrysin,  apigenin,  and  luteolin demonstrated that the presence of hydroxyl groups in the phenyl rings A (C‐5, C‐7) and B  (C‐3′, C‐4′) usually did not affect the activity level of flavones. Only in the case of S. aureus, a clear  increase in the activity of the hydroxy derivatives of flavone was observed. Similarly, the presence  and position of the sugar group in the flavone glycosides generally had no effect on the MIC values.  A comparison of our results with the literature data exhibited that the level of sensitivity of the  bacterial species to plant substances is very diverse, and strongly depends not only on the type of  active compounds but also on the strains tested. Moreover, it seems that current clinical isolates are  generally  much  less  sensitive  to  the  natural  plant  metabolites  than  standard  strains.  Numerous  standard strains have been isolated many years ago, therefore, with the currently growing resistance  of bacteria, their use for the screening microbiological tests is limited. In our investigations, we found  the  moderate  or  even  low  activity  of  flavonoids  and  organic  acids  compared  to  the  traditional  antibiotics and some plant substances. However, examples of the use of natural compounds with a  relatively low in vitro activity in the treatment of urinary tract infections, chronic wound infections,  etc. or as food additives show that widely distributed flavonoids and organic acids could find broad  practical applications.  Author  Contributions:  Conceptualization,  A.A.  and  T.M.K.;  methodology,  A.A.  and  T.M.K.;  reagents  and  investigation, A.A., M.O., and T.M.K.; visualization of chemical structures, T.M.K.; literature search, A.A., and  M.O.; writing—original draft preparation, A.A., and M.O.; writing—review and editing, A.A., and M.O. All  authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding:  This  research  was  funded  from  the  budget  of  the  Department  of  Medical  Microbiology,  Poznań  University of Medical Sciences and the Polish Multiannual Programme entitled ‘Creating the scientific basis of  the  biological  progress  and  conservation  of  plant  genetic  resources  as  a  source  of  innovation  to  support  sustainable agriculture and food security of the country’.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Chandra, H.; Bishnoi, P.; Yadav, A.; Patni, B.; Mishra, A.P.; Nautiyal, A.R. Antimicrobial resistance and the  alternative resources with special emphasis on plant‐based antimicrobials–A review. Plants 2017, 6, 16.  2. Gupta, P.D.; Birdi, T.J. Development of botanicals to combat antibiotic resistance. J. Ayur. Integr. Med. 2017,  8, 266–275.  3. Mate, A. (Ed.) Medicinal and Aromatic Plants of the World. Scientific, Production, Commercial and Utilization  Aspects; Springer Science + Business Media: Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 2015; Volume 1.  4. Zheng,  J.;  Huang,  C.;  Yang,  B.;  Kallio,  H.  Regulation  of  phytochemicals  in  fruits  and  berries  by  environmental variation—Sugars and organic acids. J. Food Biochem. 2019, 43, e12642.  5. Özçelik, B.; Kartal, M.; Orhan, I. Cytotoxicity, antiviral and antimicrobial activities of alkaloids, flavonoids,  and phenolic acids. Pharm. Biol. 2011, 49, 396–402.  6. Barbieri,  R.;  Coppo,  E.;  Marchese,  A.;  Daglia,  M.;  Sobarzo‐Sánchez,  E.;  Nabavi,  S.F.;  Nabavi,  S.M.  Phytochemicals  for  human  disease:  An  update  on  plant‐derived  compounds  antibacterial  activity.  Microbiol. Res. 2017, 196, 44–68.  7. Fialova, S.; Rendekova, K.; Mucaji, P.; Slobodnikova, L. Plant natural agents: Polyphenols, alkaloids and  essential oils as perspective solution of microbial resistance. Curr. Org. Chem. 2017, 21, 1875–1884.  8. Khameneh, B.; Iranshahy, M.; Soheili, V.; Bazzaz, B.S.F. Review on plant antimicrobials: A mechanistic  viewpoint. Antimicrob. Resist. Infect. Control. 2019, 8, 118.  9. Gutiérrez‐Grijalva, E.P.; Picos‐Salas, M.A.; Leyva‐López, N.; Criollo‐Mendoza, M.S.; Vazquez‐Olivo, G.;  Heredia,  J.B.  Flavonoids  and  phenolic  acids  from  oregano:  Occurrence,  biological  activity  and  health  benefits. Plants 2018, 7, 2.  10. Jungbauer, A.; Medjakovic, S. Anti‐inflammatory properties of culinary herbs and spices that ameliorate  the effects of metabolic syndrome. Maturitas 2012, 71, 227–239.  11. Goncalves, S.; Moreira, E.; Grosso, C.; Andrade, P.B.; Valentao, P.; Romano, A. Phenolic profile, antioxidant  activity and enzyme inhibitory activities of extracts from aromatic plants used in mediterranean diet. J.  Food Sci. Technol. 2017, 54, 219–227.  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  13  of  16  12. Mileo,  A.M.;  Nisticò,  P.;  Miccadei,  S.  Polyphenols:  Immunomodulatory  and  therapeutic  implication  in  colorectal cancer. Front. Immunol. 2019, 10, 729.  13. Singh, A.K.; Cabral, C.; Kumar, R.; Ganguly, R.; Rana, H.K.; Gupta, A.; Lauro, M.R.; Carbone, C.; Reis, F.;  Pandey, A.K. Beneficial effects of dietary polyphenols on gut microbiota and strategies to improve delivery  efficiency. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2216.  14. Wang,  M.;  Firrman,  J.;  Liu,  L.Sh.;  Yam,  K.  A  review  on  flavonoid  apigenin:  Dietary  intake,  ADME,  antimicrobial effects, and interactions with human gut microbiota. BioMed Res. Int. 2019, 2019, 7010467.  15. Chua,  L.S.  A  review  on  plant‐based  rutin  extraction  methods  and  its  pharmacological  activities.  J.  Ethnopharmacol. 2013, 150, 805–817.  16. Enogieru, A.B.; Haylett, W.; Hiss, D.Ch.; Bardien, S.; Ekpo, O.E. Rutin as a potent antioxidant: Implications  for neurodegenerative disorders. Oxid. Med. Cell Longev. 2018, 2018, 6241017.  17. Edwards, J.E.; Brown, P.N.; Talent, N.; Dickinson, T.A.; Shipley, P.R. A review of the chemistry of the genus  Crataegus. Phytochemistry 2012, 79, 5–26.  18. Yamaguchi,  K.K.L.;  Pereira,  L.F.R.;  Lamarão,  C.V.;  Lima,  E.S.;  da  Veiga‐Junior,  V.F.  Amazon  acai:  Chemistry and biological activities: A review. Food Chem. 2015, 179, 137–151.  19. Yuan,  L.;  Wang,  J.;  Wu,  W.;  Liu,  Q.;  Liu,  X.  Effect  of  isoorientin  on  intracellular  antioxidant  defence  mechanisms in hepatoma and liver cell lines. Biomed. Pharmacother. 2016, 81, 356–362.  20. Mani, R.; Natesan, V. Chrysin: Sources, beneficial pharmacological activities, and molecular mechanism of  action. Phytochemistry 2018, 145, 187–196.  21. Ożarowski,  M.;  Piasecka,  A.;  Paszel‐Jaworska,  A.;  Chaves,  D.S.;  Romaniuk,  A.;  Rybczyńska,  M.;  Gryszczynska,  A.;  Sawikowska,  A.;  Kachlicki,  P.;  Mikolajczak,  P.L.;  et  al.  Comparison  of  bioactive  compounds  content in leaf extracts  of  Passiflora incarnata, P.  caerulea  and P. alata  and in vitro  cytotoxic  potential on leukemia cell lines. Rev. Bras. Farmacogn. 2018, 28, 79–191.  22. Naz, S.; Imran, M.; Rauf, A.; Orhan, I.E.; Shariati, M.A.; Haq, I.U.; Yasmin, I.; Shahbaz, M.; Qaisrani, T.B.;  Shah, Z.A.; et al. Chrysin: Pharmacological and therapeutic properties. Life Sci. 2019, 235, 116797.  23. Przybyłek, I.; Karpiński, T.M. Antibacterial properties of propolis. Molecules 2019, 24, 2047.  24. Alam, M.A.; Subhan, N.; Rahman, M.M.; Uddin, S.J.; Reza, H.M.; Sarker, S.D. Effect of Citrus flavonoids,  naringin and naringenin, on metabolic syndrome and their mechanisms of action. Adv. Nutr. 2014, 5, 404– 417.  25. Viljakainen, S.; Visti, A.; Laakso, S. Concentrations of organic acids and soluble sugars in juices from Nordic  berries. Acta Agric. Scand. Sect. B Soil Plant Sci. 2002, 52, 101–109.  26. Pande, G.; Akoh, C.C. Organic acids, antioxidant capacity, phenolic content and lipid characterisation of  Georgia‐grown underutilized fruit crops. Food Chem. 2010, 120, 1067–1075.  27. Nour, V.; Trandafir, I.; Ionica, M.E. Ascorbic acid, anthocyanins, organic acids and mineral content of some  black and red currant cultivars. Fruits 2011, 66, 353–362.  28. Kaume, L.; Howard, L.R.; Devareddy, L. The blackberry fruit: A review on its composition and chemistry,  metabolism and bioavailability, and health benefits. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2012, 60, 5716–5727.  29. Wang, Y.; Johnson‐Cicalese, J.; Singh, A.P.; Vorsa, N. Characterization and quantification of flavonoids and  organic acids over fruit development in American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) cultivars using HPLC  and APCI‐MS/MS. Plant Sci. 2017, 262, 91–102.  30. Denev, P.; Kratchanova, M.; Petrova, I.; Klisurova, D.; Georgiev, Y.; Ognyanov, M.; Yanakieva, I. Black  chokeberry  (Aronia  melanocarpa  (Michx.)  Elliot)  fruits  and  functional  drinks  differ  significantly  in  their  chemical composition and antioxidant activity. J. Chem. 2018, 2018, 9574587.  31. Adamczak, A.; Buchwald, W.; Kozłowski, J. Variation in the content of flavonols and main organic acids in  the fruit of European cranberry (Oxycoccus palustris Pers.) growing in peatlands of North‐Western Poland.  Herba Pol. 2011, 57, 5–15.  32. Jurikova, T.; Mlcek, J.; Skrovankova, S.; Sumczynski, D.; Sochor, J.; Hlavacova, I.; Snopek, L.; Orsavova, J.  Fruits of black chokeberry Aronia melanocarpa in the prevention of chronic diseases. Molecules 2017, 22, 944.  33. Santana‐Gálvez, J.; Cisneros‐Zevallos, L.; Jacobo‐Velázquez, D.A. Chlorogenic Acid: Recent advances on  its dual role as a food additive and a nutraceutical against metabolic syndrome. Molecules 2017, 22, 358.  34. Meinhart, A.D.; Damin, F.M.; Caldeirao, L.; Silveira, T.F.F.; Filho, J.T.; Godoy, H.T. Chlorogenic acid isomer  contents in 100 plants commercialized in Brazil. Food Res. Int. 2017, 99, 522–530.  35. Shekarchi,  M.;  Hajimehdipoor,  H.;  Saeidnia,  S.;  Gohari,  A.R.;  Hamedani,  M.P.  Comparative  study  of  rosmarinic acid content in some plants of Labiatae family. Pharmacogn. Mag. 2012, 8, 37–41.  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  14  of  16  36. Ożarowski, M.; Mikołajczak, P.; Bogacz, A.; Gryszczyńska, A.; Kujawska, M.; Jodynis‐Libert, J.; Piasecka,  A.; Napieczynska, H.; Szulc, M.; Kujawski, R.; et al. Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaf extract improves memory  impairment  and  affects  acetylcholinesterase  and  butyrylcholinesterase  activities  in  rat  brain.  Fitoterapia  2013, 91, 261–271.  37. Ożarowski,  M.;  Mikolajczak,  P.L.;  Piasecka,  A.;  Kachlicki,  P.;  Kujawski,  R.;  Bogacz,  A.;  Bartkowiak‐ Wieczorek, J.; Szulc, M.; Kaminska, E.; Kujawska, M.; et al. Influence of the Melissa officinalis leaf extract on  long‐term  memory  in  scopolamine  animal  model  with  assessment  of  mechanism  of  action.  Evid. Based  Complem. Alternat. Med. 2016, 2016, 9729818.  38. Balcke, G.U.; Handrick, V.; Bergau, N.; Fichtner, M.; Henning, A.; Stellmach, H.; Tissier, A.; Hause, B.;  Frolov, A. An UPLC‐MS/MS method for highly sensitive high‐throughput analysis of phytohormones in  plant tissues. Plant Methods 2012, 8, 47.  39. Toiu, A.; Vlase, L.; Oniga, I.; Benedec, D.; Tămaş, M. HPLC analysis of salicylic derivatives from natural  products. Farmacia 2011, 59, 106–112.  40. Bijttebier, S.; van der Auwera, A.; Voorspoels, S.; Noten, B.; Hermans, N.; Pieters, L.; Apers, S. A first step  in  the  quest  for  the  active  constituents  in  Filipendula  ulmaria  (meadowsweet):  Comprehensive  phytochemical  identification  by  liquid  chromatography  coupled  to  quadrupole‐orbitrap  mass  spectrometry. Planta Med. 2016, 82, 559–572.  41. Nabavi,  S.F.;  Habtemariam,  S.;  Ahmed,  T.;  Sureda,  A.;  Daglia,  M.;  Sobarzo‐Sánchez,  E.;  Nabavi,  S.M.  Polyphenolic composition of Crataegus monogyna Jacq.: From chemistry to medical applications. Nutrients  2015, 7, 7708–7728.  42. Kerasioti, E.; Apostolou, A.; Kafantaris, I.; Chronis, K.; Kokka, E.; Dimitriadou, C.; Tzanetou, E.N.; Priftis,  A.; Koulocheri, S.D.; Haroutounian, S.; et al. Polyphenolic composition of Rosa canina, Rosa sempervivens  and Pyrocantha coccinea extracts and assessment of their antioxidant activity in human endothelial cells.  Antioxidants 2019, 8, 92.  43. Cho, J.W.; Cho, S.Y.; Lee, S.R.; Lee, K.S. Onion extract and quercetin induce matrix metalloproteinase‐1 in  vitro and in vivo. Int. J. Mol. Med. 2010, 25, 347–352.  44. Chuang,  S.Y.;  Lin,  Y.K.;  Lin,  C.F.;  Wang,  P.W.;  Chen,  E.L.;  Fang,  J.Y.  Elucidating  the  skin  delivery  of  aglycone  and  glycoside  flavonoids:  How  the  structures  affect  cutaneous  absorption.  Nutrients  2017,  9,  E1304.  45. Nagoba, B.S.; Suryawanshi, N.M.; Wadher, B.; Selkar, S. Acidic environment and wound healing: A review.  Wounds 2015, 27, 5–11.  46. Nagoba, B.; Davane, M.; Gandhi, R.; Wadher, B.; Suryawanshi, N.; Selkar, S. Treatment of skin and soft  tissue infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa—A review of our experiences with citric acid over the  past 20 years. Wound Med. 2017, 19, 5–9.  47. Bessa, L.J.; Fazii, P.; Di Giulio, M.; Cellini, L. Bacterial isolates from infected wounds and their antibiotic  susceptibility pattern: Some remarks about wound infection. Int. Wound J. 2013, 12, 47–52.  48. Karpiński, T.M. Efficacy of octenidine against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Eur. J. Biol. Res. 2019, 9, 135– 140.  49. CLSI.  Performance  Standards  for  Antimicrobial  Disk  Susceptibility  Tests.  Approved  Standard,  12th  ed.;  CLSI  document M02‐A12; Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute: Wayne, PA, USA, 2015; Volume 35, no 1.  50. EUCAST.  MIC  Determination  of  Non‐Fastidious  and  Fastidious  Organisms.  Available  online:  http://www.eucast.org/ast_of_bacteria/mic_determination (accessed on 26 July 2019).  51. Karpiński, T.M.; Adamczak, A. Fucoxanthin—An antibacterial carotenoid. Antioxidants 2019, 8, 239.  52. Gao, Z.; Shao, J.; Sun, H.; Zhong, W.; Zhuang, W.; Zhang, Z. Evaluation of different kinds of organic acids  and their antibacterial activity in Japanese Apricot fruits. Afr. J. Agric. Res. 2012, 7, 4911–4918.  53. Su,  Y.;  Ma,  L.;  Wen,  Y.;  Wang,  H.;  Zhang,  S.  Studies  of  the  in  vitro  antibacterial  activities  of  several  polyphenols against clinical isolates of methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Molecules 2014, 19, 12630– 12639.  54. Blaskovich, M.A.; Elliott, A.G.; Kavanagh, A.M.; Ramu, S.; Cooper, M.A. In vitro antimicrobial activity of  acne drugs against skin‐associated bacteria. Sci. Rep. 2019, 9, 14658.  55. Basile, A.; Giordano, S.; López‐Sáez, J.A.; Cobianchi, R.C. Antibacterial activity of pure flavonoids isolated  from mosses. Phytochemistry 1999, 52, 1479–1482.  56. Afifi, F.U.; Abu‐Dahab, R. Phytochemical screening and biological activities of Eminium spiculatum (Blume)  Kuntze (family Araceae). Nat. Prod. Res. 2012, 26, 878–882.  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  15  of  16  57. Das,  M.C.;  Sandhu,  P.;  Gupta,  P.;  Rudrapaul,  P.;  De,  U.C.;  Tribedi,  P.;  Akhter,  Y.;  Bhattacharjee,  S.  Attenuation  of  Pseudomonas  aeruginosa  biofilm  formation  by  vitexin:  A  combinatorial  study  with  azithromycin and gentamicin. Sci. Rep. 2016, 6, 23347.  58. Das, M.C.; Das, A.; Samaddar, S.; Dawarea, A.V.; Ghosh, C.; Acharjee, S.; Sandhu, P.; Jawed, J.J.; De Utpal,  C.; Majumdar, S.; et al. Vitexin alters Staphylococcus aureus surface hydrophobicity to interfere with biofilm  2 formation. bioRxiv. 2018, doi:10.1101/301473.  59. Awolola,  G.V.;  Koorbanally,  N.A.;  Chenia,  H.;  Shode,  F.O.;  Baijnath,  H.  Antibacterial  and  anti‐biofilm  activity of flavonoids and triterpenes isolated from the extracts of Ficus sansibarica Warb. subsp. Sansibarica  (Moraceae) extracts. Afr. J. Tradit. Complem. Altern. Med. 2014, 11, 124–131.  60. Rammohan, A.; Bhaskar, B.V.; Venkateswarlu, N.; Rao, V.L.; Gunasekar, D.; Zyryanov, G.V. Isolation of  flavonoids from the flowers of Rhynchosia beddomei Baker as prominent antimicrobial agents and molecular  docking. Microb. Pathog. 2019, 136, 103667.  61. Aderogba, M.A.; Akinkunmi, E.O.; Mabusela, W.T. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of flavonoid  glycosides from Dennettia tripetala G. Baker leaf extract. Nig. J. Nat. Prod. Med. 2011, 15, 49–52.  62. Cottiglia, F.; Loy, G.; Garau, D.; Floris, C.; Casu, M.; Pompei, R.; Bonsignore, L. Antimicrobial evaluation  of coumarins and flavonoids from the stems of Daphne gnidium L. Phytomedicine 2001, 8, 302–305.  63. Ali, H.; Dixit, S. In vitro antimicrobial activity of flavanoids of Ocimum sanctum with synergistic effect of  their combined form. Asian Pac. J. Trop. Dis. 2012, 2, S396–S398.  64. Celiz, G.; Daz, M.; Audisio, M.C. Antibacterial activity of naringin derivatives against pathogenic strains.  J. Appl. Microbiol. 2011, 111, 731–738.  65. Akhtar, M.S.; Hossain, M.A.; Said, S.A. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compound from the  stem‐bark of the traditionally used medicinal plant Adenium obesum. J. Tradit. Complem. Med. 2017, 7, 296– 300.  66. Singh, M.; Govindarajan, R.; Rawat, A.K.S.; Khare, P.B. Antimicrobial flavonoid rutin from Pteris vittata L.  against pathogenic gastrointestinal microflora. Am. Fern J. 2008, 98, 98–103.  67. Liu, H.; Mou, Y.; Zhao, J.; Wang, J.; Zhou, L.; Wang, M.; Wang, D.; Han, J.; Yu, Z.; Yang, F. Flavonoids from  Halostachys caspica and their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Molecules 2010, 15, 7933–7945.  68. Banerjee, K.; Banerjee, S.; Das, S.; Mandal, M. Probing the potential of apigenin liposomes in enhancing  bacterial membrane perturbation and integrity loss. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 2015, 453, 48–59.  69. Ekambaram,  S.P.;  Perumal,  S.S.;  Balakrishnan,  A.;  Marappan,  N.;  Gajendran,  S.S.;  Viswanathan,  V.  Antibacterial synergy between rosmarinic acid and antibiotics against methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus  aureus. J. Intercult. Ethnopharmacol. 2016, 5, 358–363.  70. Smiljkovic, M.; Stanisavljevic, D.; Stojkovic, D.; Petrovic, I.; Vicentic, M.J.; Popovic, J.; Golic Grdadolnik, S.;  Markovic, D.; Sankovic‐Babice, S.; Glamoclija, J.; et al. Apigenin‐7‐O‐glucoside versus apigenin: Insight into  the modes of anticandidal and cytotoxic actions. EXCLI J. 2017, 16, 795–807.  71. Matejczyk,  M.;  Swisłocka,  R.;  Golonko,  A.;  Lewandowski,  W.;  Hawrylik,  E.  Cytotoxic,  genotoxic  and  antimicrobial  activity of  caffeic  and rosmarinic  acids and  their  lithium, sodium and  potassium salts  as  potential anticancer compounds. Adv. Med. Sci. 2018, 63, 14–21.  72. Ren,  G.;  Xue,  P.;  Sun,  X.;  Zhao,  G.  Determination  of  the  volatile  and  polyphenol  constituents  and  the  antimicrobial, antioxidant, and tyrosinase inhibitory activities of the bioactive compounds from the by‐ product of Rosa rugosa Thunb. var. plena Regal tea. BMC Complem. Altern. Med. 2018, 18, 307.  73. Huang,  C.Y.  Inhibition  of  a  putative  dihydropyrimidinase  from  Pseudomonas  aeruginosa  PAO1  by  flavonoids and substrates of cyclic amidohydrolases. PLoS ONE. 2015, 10, e0127634.  74. Bustos,  P.S.;  Deza‐Ponzio,  R.;  Páez,  P.L.;  Cabrera,  J.L.;  Virgolini,  M.B.;  Ortega,  M.G.  Flavonoids  as  protective agents against oxidative stress induced by gentamicin in systemic circulation. Potent protective  activity and microbial synergism of luteolin. Food Chem Toxicol. 2018, 118, 294–302.  75. Xie,  Y.;  Yang,  W.;  Tang,  F.;  Chen,  X.;  Ren,  L.  Antibacterial  activities  of  flavonoids:  Structure‐activity  relationship and mechanism. Curr. Med. Chem. 2015, 22, 132–149.  76. Górniak, I.; Bartoszewski, R.; Króliczewski, J. Comprehensive review of antimicrobial activities of plant  flavonoids. Phytochem. Rev. 2019, 18, 241–272.  77. Ohemeng, K.A.; Schwender, C.F.; Fu, K.P.; Barrett, J.F. DNA gyrase inhibitory and antibacterial activity of  some flavones. Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 1993, 3, 225–230.  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  16  of  16  78. Lee, J.H.; Regmi, S.C.; Kim, J.A.; Cho, M.H.; Yun, H.; Lee, C.S.; Lee, J. Apple flavonoid phloretin inhibits  Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation and ameliorates colon inflammation in rats. Infect. Immun. 2011,  79, 4819–4827.  79. Siriwong, S.; Thumanu, K.; Hengpratom, T.; Eumkeb, G. Synergy and mode ofaction of ceftazidime plus  quercetin or luteolin on Streptococcus pyogenes. Evid. Based Complem. Altern. Med. 2015, 2015, 759459.  80. Betts,  J.W.;  Sharili,  A.S.;  Phee,  L.M.;  Wareham,  D.W.  In  vitro  activity  of  epigallocatechin  gallate  and  quercetin alone and in combination versus clinical isolates of methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus. J.  Nat. Prod. 2015, 78, 2145–2148.  81. Hossion,  A.M.;  Zamami,  Y.;  Kandahary,  R.K.;  Tsuchiya,  T.;  Ogawa,  W.;  Iwado,  A.  Quercetin  diacylglycoside  analogues  showing  dual  inhibition  of  DNA  gyrase  and  topoisomerase  IV  as  novel  antibacterial agents. J. Med. Chem. 2011, 54, 3686–3703.  82. Chen, C.C.; Huang, C.Y. Inhibition of Klebsiella pneumoniae DnaB helicase by the flavonol galangin. Protein  J. 2011, 30, 59–65.  83. Lin, H.H.; Huang,  C.Y. Characterization of flavonol inhibition  of DnaB helicase: Real‐time monitoring,  structural modeling, and proposed mechanism. J. Biomed. Biotechnol. 2012, 2012, 735368.  84. Huang,  Y.H.;  Huang,  C.C.;  Chen,  C.C.;  Yang,  K.;  Huang,  C.Y.  Inhibition  of  Staphylococcus  aureus  PriA  helicase by flavonol kaempferol. Protein J. 2015, 34, 169–172.  85. Farhadi,  F.;  Khameneh,  B.;  Iranshahi,  M.;  Iranshahy,  M.  Antibacterial  activity  of  flavonoids  and  their  structure‐activity relationship: An update review. Phytother. Res. 2019, 33, 13–40.  86. Echeverría,  J.;  Opazo,  J.;  Mendoza,  L.;  Urzúa,  A.;  Wilkens,  M.  Structure‐activity  and  lipophilicity  relationships of selected antibacterial natural flavones and flavanones of chilean flora. Molecules 2017, 22,  608.  87. Xie, Y.; Chen, J.; Xiao, A.; Liu, L. Antibacterial activity of polyphenols: Structure‐activity relationship and  influence of hyperglycemic condition. Molecules 2017, 22, 1913.  88. Bouarab‐Chibane, L.; Forquet, V.; Lantéri, P.; Clément, Y.; Léonard‐Akkari, L.; Oulahal, N.; Degraeve, P.;  Bordes, C. Antibacterial properties of polyphenols: Characterization and QSAR (Quantitative Structure– Activity Relationship) models. Front. Microbiol. 2019, 10, 829.  89. Morimoto, Y.; Baba, T.; Sasaki, T.; Hiramatsu, K. Apigenin as an anti‐quinolone‐resistance antibiotic. Int. J.  Antimicrob. Agents. 2015, 46, 666–673.  90. Amin, A.; Vincent, R.; Séverine, M. Rosmarinic acid and its methyl ester as antimicrobial components of  the hydromethanolic extract of Hyptis atrorubens Poit. (Lamiaceae). Evid. Based Complem. Alternat. Med. 2013,  2013, 604536.  91. Nagoba, B.S.; Gandhi, R.C.; Wadher, B.J.; Potekar, R.M.; Kolhe, S.M. Microbiological, histopathological and  clinical changes in chronic infected wounds after citric acid treatment. J. Med. Microbiol. 2008, 57, 681–682.  92. Jensen, H.D.; Struve, C.; Christensen, S.B.; Krogfelt, K.A. Cranberry juice and combinations of its organic  acids are effective against experimental urinary tract infection. Front. Microbiol. 2017, 8, 542.  93. Bai, J.; Wu, Y.; Zhong, K.; Xiao, K.; Liu, L.; Huang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Gao, H. A comparative study on the effects  of quinic acid and shikimic acid on cellular functions of Staphylococcus aureus. J. Food Prot. 2018, 81, 1187– 1192.  © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access  article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution  (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Medicine Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Antibacterial Activity of Some Flavonoids and Organic Acids Widely Distributed in Plants

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/antibacterial-activity-of-some-flavonoids-and-organic-acids-widely-0tyHv0fKvx

References (98)

Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2020 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2077-0383
DOI
10.3390/jcm9010109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Antibacterial Activity of Some Flavonoids and  Organic Acids Widely Distributed in Plants  1 2 3,   Artur Adamczak  , Marcin Ożarowski   and Tomasz M. Karpiński  *   Department of Botany, Breeding and Agricultural Technology of Medicinal Plants, Institute of Natural  Fibres and Medicinal Plants, Kolejowa 2, 62‐064 Plewiska, Poland; artur.adamczak@iwnirz.pl    Department of Biotechnology, Institute of Natural Fibres and Medicinal Plants, Wojska Polskiego 71b,   60‐630 Poznań, Poland; marcin.ozarowski@iwnirz.pl    Department of Medical Microbiology, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Wieniawskiego 3,   61‐712 Poznań, Poland  *  Correspondence: tkarpin@ump.edu.pl  Received: 21 November 2019; Accepted: 27 December 2019; Published: 31 December 2019  Abstract: Among natural substances widespread in fruits, vegetables, spices, and medicinal plants,  flavonoids and organic acids belong to the promising groups of bioactive compounds with strong  antioxidant and  anti‐inflammatory properties. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the  antibacterial activity of 13 common flavonoids (flavones, flavonols, flavanones) and 6 organic acids  (aliphatic  and  aromatic  acids).  The  minimal  inhibitory  concentrations  (MICs)  of  selected  plant  substances were determined by the micro‐dilution method using clinical strains of four species of  pathogenic  bacteria.  All  tested  compounds  showed  antimicrobial  properties,  but  their  biological  activity was moderate or relatively low. Bacterial growth was most strongly inhibited by salicylic  acid (MIC = 250–500 μg/mL). These compounds were generally more active against Gram‐negative  bacteria: Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa than Gram‐positive ones: Enterococcus faecalis  and Staphylococcus aureus. An analysis of the antibacterial effect of flavone, chrysin, apigenin, and  luteolin showed that the presence of hydroxyl groups in the phenyl rings A and B usually did not  influence  on  the  level  of  their  activity.  A  significant  increase  in  the  activity  of  the  hydroxy  derivatives of flavone was observed only for S. aureus. Similarly, the presence and position of the  sugar group in the flavone glycosides generally had no effect on the MIC values.  Keywords: kaempferol; naringin; orientin; rutin; vitexin; chlorogenic acid; citric acid; malic acid;  quinic acid; rosmarinic acid  1. Introduction  Screening biological studies of chemical compounds of natural origin allow for assessment of  their activity and determine further research stages in order to search for new therapeutic solutions  based  on  active  compounds  known  in  plants.  This  is  especially  important  during  the  observed  increasing resistance of bacteria and fungi to antibiotics. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious  threat to human health, but also to crops and animals. MDR is a growing challenge in medicine.  Recently, several multinational studies have been carried out to determine the prevalence of herbal  medicine use in infections due to pathogenic microorganisms [1,2]. It is considered that extracts of  medicinal plants can be an alternative source of resistance modifying substances [2]. It is well known  that plant extracts and other herbal products are complex mixtures containing the wide variety of  primary and secondary metabolites, and their action may be the result of the synergy of different  chemical  components.  Moreover,  these  extracts  may  show  various  mechanisms  of  biological  and  pharmacological activity, i.e., ability to bind to protein domains, modulation of the immune response,  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109; doi:10.3390/jcm9010109  www.mdpi.com/journal/jcm  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  2  of  16  mitosis, apoptosis, and signal transduction [2]. However, it should be noted that plants interact with  the environment and other organisms, therefore their chemical composition and the level of active  substances  can  be  very  diverse  [3,4].  In  addition,  the  manufacturing  process  of  herbal  medicinal  products is very complex because it encompasses non‐standardized processes like the cultivation of  plants, obtaining the vegetable raw material from various parts of the world, preparing of extract,  and producing a product in accordance with local guidelines of the good manufacturing practice.  Therefore, it can be concluded that using pure chemical compounds of natural origin would be an  interesting complementary option due to their easier therapeutic dosage, the study of mechanisms of  the pharmacological action and monitoring of their side effects.  A lot of widespread plant substances, including alkaloids, organosulfur compounds, phenolic  acids, flavonoids, carotenoids, coumarins, terpenes, tannins, and some primary metabolites (amino  acids, peptides, organic acids) exhibit antimicrobial properties [1,5–8]. Among them, flavonoids are  a promising group of bioactive substances with low systemic toxicity. Natural flavonols, flavones,  flavanones, and other compounds of this class belong to the common secondary metabolites found  in  various  fruits,  vegetables,  and  medicinal  plants  [9]  showing  strong  antioxidant  and  anti‐ inflammatory  properties  [10,11].  Dietary  polyphenols  such  as  flavonoids  and  phenolic  acids,  consumed in large quantities in foods of plant origin, exhibit a number of beneficial effects and play  an important role in the prevention of chronic and degenerative diseases. Not only their antioxidant  and  anti‐inflammatory  activities,  but  also  neuroprotective,  anticancer,  immunomodulatory,  antidiabetic,  and  anti‐adipogenic  properties  have  been  shown  [12,13].  Biological  availability  of  dietary polyphenols is low as compared with micro‐ and macronutrients. Their absorption in the  small  intestine  amounts  only  about  5–10%.  However,  recent  studies  showed  that  these  phytochemicals exhibit prebiotic properties and antimicrobial activity against pathogenic intestinal  microflora [13].  Flavonoids  selected  for  our  microbiological  tests  are  presented  in  Figure  1.  In  the  large  quantities, they occur in stems and leaves, flowers as well as fruits of the species from the families of  Apiaceae,  Asteraceae,  Betulaceae,  Brassicaceae,  Ericaceae,  Fabaceae,  Hypericaceae,  Lamiaceae,  Liliaceae, Passifloraceae, Polygonaceae, Primulaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, Rubiaceae, Rutaceae,  Scrophulariaceae,  Tiliaceae,  and  Violaceae.  Two  flavonols:  quercetin,  kaempferol,  and  flavones:  apigenin,  luteolin  belong  to  the  most  ubiquitous  plant  flavonoids  [14].  A  glycoside  form  of  quercetin—rutin  (sophorin,  rutoside)  is  present  in  the  highest  concentrations  in  buckwheat  (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench), rue (Ruta graveolens L.), flower buds of Styphnolobium japonicum (L.)  Schott (Sophora japonica L.), apricots, peaches, and citrus fruits [15,16]. Apigenin derivatives, such as  vitexin, isovitexin, and vitexin 2″‐O‐rhamnoside constitute the main bioactive compounds of leaves  and flowers of hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) [17]. The 8‐ and 6‐C‐glucosides of luteolin: orientin and  isoorientin are reported from different crop plants, including buckwheat, corn silk (Zea mays L.), acai  fruits  (Euterpe  oleracea  Mart.,  E.  precatoria  Mart.),  and  Moso  bamboo  leaves  (Phyllostachys  edulis/Carrière/J.Houz.) [18,19]. In turn, passion fruits (Passiflora spp.), skullcap roots (Scutellaria spp.)  as well as honey and propolis are the main natural sources of chrysin [20–23]. Naringin is a flavanone  glycoside isolated from grapes and citrus fruits, and it imparts a bitter taste to grapefruit juice [24].      Chrysin  Flavone  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  3  of  16      Apigenin  Luteolin      Vitexin  Orientin  Vitexin 2”‐O‐rhamnoside      Isovitexin  Isoorientin  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  4  of  16      Kaempferol  Quercetin  Naringin  Rutin  Figure 1. Chemical structures of flavonoids tested in the present research.  In addition to flavonoids, a lot of organic acids: both aliphatic and aromatic ones, especially  phenolics are the important bioactive compounds of edible and medicinal plants (Figure 2). Among  non‐aromatic, short‐chain hydroxy acids, malic, citric, and quinic acids belong to the most abundant  substances with a key role in plant metabolism and physiology. Malic and citric acids are mainly  produced in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (Krebs cycle) and, to a lesser degree, in the glyoxylate cycle,  while  quinic  acid  is  a  byproduct  of  the  shikimic  acid  pathway  [4].  High  accumulation  of  these  compounds  is  observed  in  various  berry  fruits  of  wild  and  cultivated  plants  from  the  Ericaceae,  Rosaceae, and  Grossulariaceae families,  including  cranberry (Vaccinium  macrocarpon Aiton and  V.  oxycoccos  L.),  bilberry  (V.  myrtillus  L.),  blueberry  (V.  corymbosum  L.),  blackberry  (Rubus  spp.),  raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.), black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa/Michx./Elliott), red currant (Ribes  rubrum L.), black currant (Ribes nigrum L.), and many others [25–30]. For example, the total content of  citric, malic, and quinic acids in fruits of European cranberry can reach almost 37% of dry matter [31].  Citric acid  Malic acid  Quinic acid  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  5  of  16     Chlorogenic acid  Rosmarinic acid  Salicylic acid  Figure 2. Chemical structures of organic acids tested in the present research.  Berries  are  also  a  rich  source  of  hydroxycinnamic  acids  and  their  derivatives,  including  chlorogenic (5‐O‐caffeoylquinic) and neochlorogenic (3‐O‐caffeoylquinic) acids, which are the esters  formed  between  caffeic  (3,4‐dihydroxycinnamic)  and  quinic  acids  [32,33].  A  great  amount  of  chlorogenic acid isomers has been found, among others, in yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis A.St‐Hil.),  coffee (Coffea spp.), and tea plant (Camellia sinensis/L./Kuntze) [34]. In turn, rosmarinic acid, an ester  of  caffeic  and  3,4‐dihydroxyphenyllactic  acids,  was  isolated  for  the  first  time  from  the  rosemary  leaves (Rosmarinus officinalis L.). It commonly occurs in many aromatic and medicinal plants of the  Lamiaceae  family,  especially  mint  (Mentha  spp.)  and  thyme  (Thymus  spp.)  species,  lemon  balm  (Melissa officinalis L.), common sage (Salvia officinalis L.), oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), and sweet  basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) [35–37]. Another well‐known secondary metabolite, the phytohormone  salicylic acid (SA), is a key signaling compound that participates in the plant response to pathogens,  herbivores, and abiotic stress [38]. Natural salicylates such as salicylic acid and salicin (salicyl alcohol  glucoside) were found in large amounts in the willow bark (Salix spp.), the buds of black poplar  (Populus nigra L.), elm leaves (Ulmus spp.), and meadowsweet herb (Filipendula ulmaria/L./Maxim.)  [39,40].  Our studies were focused on the estimation of antibacterial activity of selected flavonoids and  organic acids widespread in fruits, vegetables, spices, and popular medicinal plants which are very  often  used  for  the  prevention  and  treatment  of  various  diseases.  For  example,  many  herbal  preparations  utilized  as  natural  diuretics,  and  plant  extracts  with  other  main  pharmacological  activities  (i.e.,  drugs  against  cardiovascular  diseases,  sedatives,  anti‐inflammatory  agents)  exhibit  additional beneficial effects by the antimicrobial action [41,42]. Recent data show that flavonoids have  protective potential against cutaneous inflammatory reactions and affect wound healing [43,44]. In  addition, organic acids (especially citric acid) seem to be of significant importance in the antimicrobial  activity and health of the skin [45,46]. In the present studies, we tested the biological activity of chosen  flavonoids and organic acids against four widespread pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus  faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. These Gram‐positive and Gram‐negative bacteria  can  cause  many  diseases  in  humans,  including  opportunistic  infections  and  belong  to  the  most  common etiological factors of the skin and wound infections [47,48].  Microbiological screening tests included 19 plant metabolites from the various flavonoid classes:  flavones, flavonols, flavanones, and simple organic acids: aliphatic and aromatic ones. The chosen  flavonoids differed in the number of hydroxyl groups on the aromatic rings as well as the presence  and position of the sugar group, which gave the opportunity to test the effect of these parameters on  the biological activity of the natural compounds.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Chemicals  Chemicals used in this study were purchased from Merck (Sigma‐Aldrich, Supelco, Poland).  Plant compounds selected for the microbiological tests are presented in Table 1. All substances were  dissolved  in  20%  water  solution  of  dimethyl  sulfoxide  DMSO  (Sigma‐Aldrich,  Poland)  in  a  final  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  6  of  16  concentration of 1 mg/mL. Additionally, DMSO was used as a negative control, while two antibiotics,  ciprofloxacin  (Sigma,  cat.  no.  17850)  and  gentamicin  sulfate  (Sigma‐Aldrich,  cat.  no.  G1914)  as  positives.  Table 1. Plant pure substances used in the microbiological assays.  No  Merck (Sigma‐Aldrich, Supelco)  CAS No  PubChem CID  Purity  1  Apigenin  520‐36‐5  5280443  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  2  Chrysin  480‐40‐0  5281607  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  3  Flavone  525‐82‐6  10680  ≥99.0%  4  Isoorientin  4261‐42‐1  114776  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  5  Isovitexin  38953‐85‐4  162350  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  6  Kaempferol  520‐18‐3  5280863  ≥97.0% (HPLC)  7  Luteolin  491‐70‐3  5280445  ≥97.0% (HPLC)  8  Naringin  10236‐47‐2  442428  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  9  Orientin  28608‐75‐5  5281675  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  10  Quercetin  117‐39‐5  5280343  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  11  Rutin  153‐18‐4  5280805  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  12  Vitexin  3681‐93‐4  5280441  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  13  Vitexin 2″‐O‐rhamnoside  64820‐99‐1  5282151  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  14  Chlorogenic acid  327‐97‐9  1794427  ≥95.0% (HPLC)  15  Citric acid  77‐92‐9  311  ≤100%  16  Malic acid  6915‐15‐7  525  ≤100%  17  Quinic acid  77‐95‐2  6508  analytical standard  18  Rosmarinic acid  20283‐92‐5  5281792  ≥98.0% (HPLC)  19  Salicylic acid  69‐72‐7  338  ≥99.0%  2.2. Bacterial Strains and Antimicrobial Activity  In the in vitro tests, there were investigated clinical isolates of two Gram‐positive (Staphylococcus  aureus, Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram‐negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa). For  each species, four strains obtained from the collection of the Department of Medical Microbiology at  Poznań University of Medical Sciences (Poland) were tested. None of them were multidrug‐resistant.  The species of bacteria were grown at 35 °C for 24 h, in tryptone soy agar (TSA; Graso, Poland).  The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of selected plant substances were determined by  the  micro‐dilution  method  using  the  96‐well  plates  (Nest  Scientific  Biotechnology).  Studies  were  conducted  according  to  the  Clinical  and  Laboratory  Standards  Institute  (CLSI)  [49],  European  Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) recommendations [50], and as described  in our previous publications [48,51]. Primarily, 90 μL of Mueller–Hinton broth (Graso, Poland) was  placed in each well. Serial dilutions of each of the substances were performed so that concentrations in  the  range  of  15.6–1000 μg/mL  were  obtained.  In  the  initial  tests  of  antibacterial  activity  of  phytochemicals,  the  lowest  concentration  amounted  to  1.95 μg/mL  (Figure  3),  while  for  positive  controls (antibiotics) it was 0.98 μg/mL. The inoculums were adjusted to contain approximately 10   CFU/mL bacteria. 10 μL of the proper inoculums were added to the wells, obtaining concentration 10   CFU/mL. The plates were incubated at 35 °C for 24 h, then 20 μL of 1% MTT water solution (3‐(4,5‐ Dimethyl‐2‐thiazolyl)‐2,5‐diphenyl‐2H‐tetrazolium bromide, Sigma‐Aldrich) was added to the wells.  Next, the plates were incubated 2–4 h at 37 °C. This assay is based on the reduction of yellow tetrazolium  salt  (MTT)  to  a  soluble  purple  formazan  product  [48].  The  MIC  value  was  taken  as  the  lowest  concentration of the substance that inhibited any visible bacterial growth. The analyses were repeated  three times.  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  7  of  16  Figure  3.  The  minimal  inhibitory  concentrations  (MICs)  of  selected  plant  substances  against  Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain according to the micro‐dilution method.  In our investigations, we adopted the range of tested concentrations of phytochemicals for the  MICs between 15.6 and 1000 μg/mL, although some authors determine the antimicrobial activity of  natural compounds at the level of 2000–4000 μg/mL or more [52–54]. However, in our opinion, such  high values indicate a very weak effect of these substances. During the description of the results, it was  taken that the MIC = 250 μg/mL shows a relatively high antibacterial activity of plant chemicals, while  the MICs = 500 and 1000 μg/mL mean moderate and low effects, respectively.  3. Results  Our research exhibited antibacterial properties of all tested flavonoids and organic acids, but  their activity was quite diverse. These compounds were generally more active against Gram‐negative  than Gram‐positive bacteria. The following tendency of microbial sensitivity to plant substances was  observed: E. coli > P. aeruginosa > E. faecalis > S. aureus (Table 2). Salicylic acid showed the highest  biological  effect  on  all  bacterial  species  (MIC  =  250–500 μg/mL).  However,  other  chemicals  demonstrated a similar activity, especially against E. coli and P. aeruginosa (MIC = 500 μg/mL). Among  19  investigated  phytochemicals,  only  three:  kaempferol,  quercetin,  and  chlorogenic  acid  had  no  significant influence on P. aeruginosa, while up to 10 compounds were relatively inactive against S.  aureus (MIC > 1000 μg/mL). It was interesting that the individual strains of a given bacterial species  most often did not show differences in the sensitivity to one plant substance. Only salicylic acid,  rosmarinic acid, and apigenin exhibited differentiating effects on individual strains.  Table 2. Antibacterial activity of selected plant substances against Gram (+) and Gram (−) bacteria.  Tested Bacteria    Staphylococcus  Enterococcus  Pseudomonas  Plant Substance  Escherichia coli  aureus  faecalis  aeruginosa  MIC (μg/mL)  Kaempferol  >1000  >1000  500  >1000  Quercetin  >1000  >1000  500  >1000  Rutin  1000  1000  500  500  Naringin  >1000  1000  500  500  Flavone  >1000  500  500  500  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  8  of  16  Chrysin  500  1000  500  500  Apigenin  500, 1000 (3x)  1000  500  500  Vitexin  >1000  1000  500  500  Isovitexin  >1000  1000  500  500  Vitexin 2″‐O‐rhamnoside  >1000  1000  500  500  Luteolin  500  1000  500  500  Orientin  500  1000  500  500  Isoorientin  500  1000  500  500  Citric acid  >1000  1000  500  500  Malic acid  1000  1000  500  500  Quinic acid  >1000  1000  500  500  Chlorogenic acid  1000  1000  500  >1000  Rosmarinic acid  >1000  1000  500  500 (2x), 1000 (2x)  Salicylic acid  250 (2x), 500 (2x)  500  250 (3x), 500  500  Median  >1000  1000  500  500  20% DMSO (negative control)  >1000  >1000  >1000  >1000  Ciprofloxacin (positive)  <1  <1  <1  <1  Gentamicin sulfate (positive)  <1  <1–62.5  <1–3.9  <1  Although  flavonol  aglycones  kaempferol  and  quercetin  displayed  a  moderate  activity  only  against E. coli, quercetin glycoside rutin demonstrated influence on all strains tested (MIC = 500–1000  μg/mL). A similar activity level was found for the glycosides from the other classes of flavonoids:  flavanones  (naringin)  and  flavones  (vitexin,  isovitexin,  vitexin  2″‐O‐rhamnoside,  orientin,  isoorientin).  Differences  were  determined  only  in  the  case  of  S.  aureus.  Naringin,  vitexin  and  its  derivatives  showed  no  significant  activity,  while  orientin  and  isoorientin  were  clearly  stronger  antibacterial agents than rutin.  Among organic acids, the highest variability in the microbiological effect was found against S.  aureus and P. aeruginosa. Some metabolites such as citric, quinic, and rosmarinic acids for S. aureus,  and also chlorogenic acid for P. aeruginosa were relatively inactive. The aliphatic acids: citric, malic  and quinic ones showed the same level of activity within individual species of E. faecalis, E. coli, and  P. aeruginosa (MIC = 500–1000 μg/mL). In turn, phenolic compounds: chlorogenic, rosmarinic, and  salicylic acids exhibited variation within all bacterial species with the MIC values from 250 to above  1000 μg/mL.  4. Discussion  In recent years, a rapid increase in the number of studies concerning the antibacterial properties  of  plant  extracts  rich  in  phenolic  compounds,  including  flavonoids  and  phenolic  acids  has  been  observed. However, due to the enormous wealth of species and natural substances, the degree of  their examination is very diverse and still insufficient. Particularly, works on the antibacterial activity  of  individual  pure  compounds  are  relatively  few.  There  is  a  small  number  of  microbiological  investigations describing the effects of some common flavonoid glycosides such as vitexin [55–58],  isovitexin [59,60], vitexin 2″‐O‐rhamnoside [61], orientin [62,63], and isoorientin [56,60,62].  In  addition,  literature  data  are  difficult  to  compare  due  to  the  use  of  various  methods  for  assessing antibacterial activity, different solvents, and the origin and purity of test compounds, often  isolated from various plant extracts [55,57,59,60,62–65]. Antimicrobial properties of natural chemicals  were described not only by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) [33,54,57,62,64,66–72] and  by the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) [72], but also by the agar well or disc‐diffusion  methods  [59,60,63,65].  Some  authors  expressed  results  as  the  IC50  or  MIC80  values  [33,67,73].  Moreover, the plant substances were tested in various concentrations. The kind of solvent used for  the dissolution of pure compounds is the next important point in the assessment of in vitro activity.  Although  most  authors  utilized dimethyl sulfoxide,  sometimes they did not give its concentration  [59,62,63,65] or it is 100% DMSO [54], which may affect the level of antimicrobial activity of the tested  solutions. The other solvents used were, for example, acetone [67], chloroform [59], Mueller Hinton II  broth [68], and water [71]. In several cases, there was no information about dissolving procedures  [57,58,60]. In this context, there is still a need for extensive screening studies that would compare the  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  9  of  16  activity of a large number of plant metabolites against the same bacterial strains by a standardized  method.  Our investigations exhibited moderate antibacterial properties of tested flavonoids and organic  acids against clinical strains of Gram‐negative pathogens: E. coli and P. aeruginosa (MIC = 500 μg/mL).  Among 19 selected plant substances, only three: kaempferol, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid were  inactive against P. aeruginosa at all concentrations tested (15.6–1000 μg/mL). However, for up to 10  compounds,  no  significant  activity  was  found  against  the  Gram‐positive  bacteria  S.  aureus.  Additionally, another microorganism from this group E. faecalis showed low sensitivity (MIC = 1000  μg/mL) to most analyzed metabolites (Table 2). The above‐described observations confirm the results  of works which indicate a higher activity of natural plant substances, including flavonoids, against  some Gram‐negative bacteria than Gram‐positive ones, although it is usually considered that this  regularity  is  the  opposite  [48,55].  The  general  tendency  of  bacterial  sensitivity  to  selected  plant  substances was observed as follows: E. coli > P. aeruginosa > E. faecalis > S. aureus (Table 2). Some  screening studies showed the greater activity of alkaloids, flavonoids, and phenolic acids especially  against P. aeruginosa, and also E. coli than S. aureus [5,55]. However, this relationship seems to have  significant limitations and requires further detailed research. For example, all strains of S. aureus, E.  coli,  and  P.  aeruginosa  tested  by  us  had  the  same  level  of sensitivity  to  flavones  chrysin,  luteolin,  orientin, isoorientin, and some clinical isolates of them to apigenin and salicylic acid. No differences  in the inhibitory potency of bacterial growth of above‐mentioned species were previously reported,  among others, for luteolin, orientin, isoorientin [62], and in the case of S. aureus and E. coli for chrysin  [67], luteolin [74], and glycosides of quercetin hyperoside and rutin [72].  Numerous studies allow to state that in antibacterial mechanisms of flavonoids are included  mainly:  inhibition  of  synthesis  of  nucleic  acid,  inhibition  of  cytoplasmic  membrane  function  by  influence the biofilm formation, porins, permeability, and by interaction with some crucial enzymes  [6,8,75,76]. It was shown that apigenin inhibits the DNA gyrase of E. coli [77], and has inhibitory  effects on the formation of E. coli biofilm [78]. Recently, a liposomal formulation of apigenin was  examined, and it was observed increasing of its antibacterial property by the interaction of apigenin  liposomes with the membrane of tested bacteria resulted in the lysis of the bacterial cells. Comparison  of results exhibited much greater efficiency of liposomal apigenin against both Gram‐positive and  Gram‐negative bacteria: B. subtilis (MIC = 4 μg/mL), S. aureus (MIC = 8 μg/mL), and E. coli (MIC = 16  μg/mL), P. aeruginosa (MIC = 64 μg/mL) [68]. Other flavones, including apigenin C‐glucosides such  as  vitexin and isovitexin, have also  been tested in order to study their effect on bacterial surface  hydrophobicity  and  biofilm  formation  [57–59].  Das  et  al.  [58]  reported  that  vitexin  reduces  the  hydrophobicity of cell surface and membrane permeability of S. aureus at the sub‐MIC dose of 126  μg/mL.  This  flavone  down‐regulated  the  icaAB  and  agrAC  gene  expression  showing  antibiofilm  activity and bactericidal effect. In similar work, Das et al. [57] demonstrated that vitexin exerts the  MIC of 260 μg/mL against P. aeruginosa, and exhibits moderate antibiofilm activity. In turn, isovitexin  (200–500 μg/mL)  decreased  the  adhesion  of  methicillin‐sensitive  S.  aureus  ATCC  29213,  and  simultaneously increased the adhesion of two strains of E. coli [59]. Currently, it was shown that  isovitexin has the potent antibacterial properties described as the diameter of the zone of growth  inhibition (ZOI) for B. subtilis (19.5 mm), P. aeruginosa (17.5 mm), E. coli (14.1 mm), and Staphylococcus  aureus (12.8 mm). The even stronger activity was found for isoorientin (luteolin C‐glucoside), and it  was as follows: B. subtilis (20.1 mm), P. aeruginosa (19.1 mm), S. aureus (18.7 mm), and E. coli (14.8 mm)  [60].  Microbiological literature provides interesting data on the mechanism of action of two main  flavonols:  kaempferol  and  quercetin.  It  was  shown  that  quercetin  increases  the  cytoplasmic  membrane  permeability  of  S.  pyogenes  which  resulted  in  the  inhibitory  influence  on  this  Gram‐ positive bacterium at the MIC value of 128 μg/mL [79]. Moreover, in this study, the synergistic effect  of quercetin with antibiotic ceftazidime was observed. Barbieri et al. [6] concluded that this flavonol  is active not only against Gram‐positive pathogens: S. aureus, S. haemolyticus, and S. pyogenes, but also  against Gram‐negative ones: E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Additionally, Betts et al. [80] showed a strongly  inhibiting  effect  against  methicillin‐resistant  S.  aureus,  which  was  significantly  increased  in  the  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  10  of  16  presence of epigallocatechin gallate. Studies of the mechanism of antimicrobial action allowed to state  that quercetin diacyl glycosides show dual inhibition of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV [81]. In  turn, our investigations exhibited the moderate effect of these plant metabolites against E. coli (MIC  = 500 μg/mL), and lack of significant activity in the case of S. aureus (MIC > 1000 μg/mL). Research of  Chen and Huang [82] concerning quercetin and kaempferol reported inhibition of the interaction of  DNA  B  helicase  of  K.  pneumoniae  with  deoxynucleotide  triphosphates  (dNTPs).  Further  study  showed  that  the  ATPase  activity  of  this  helicase  KpDnaB  was  decreased  to  75%  and  65%  in  the  presence of quercetin and kaempferol, respectively [83]. In the next work, Huang et al. [84] observed  that  kaempferol  inhibits  the  DNA  PriA  helicase  of  S.  aureus,  and  these  results  showed  that  the  concentration of phosphate from ATP hydrolysis by this DNA helicase was decreased to 37% in the  presence of 35 μM kaempferol. Thus, it was summarized that kaempferol can bind to DNA helicase  and  then  inhibit  its  ATPase  activity  and  this  is  a  new  mechanism  of  action  for  this  chemical  compound.  According  to  the  results,  this  flavonol  may  be  taken  into  consideration  as  an  active  natural molecule in the development of new antibiotics against S. aureus [84]. Currently, Huang [73]  demonstrated the inhibitory effect of kaempferol on the activity of a dihydropyrimidinase from P.  aeruginosa with the IC50 value of 50 ± 2 μM.  Nowadays, it is believed that the structure‐activity relationship in the antimicrobial effect of  flavonoids should be further examined because it is a very large group of compounds, and many  issues have not yet been clarified. Xie et al. [75] concluded that hydroxyl groups at special positions  on the aromatic rings of flavonoids improve the antibacterial effect. Flavonoids have the C6‐C3‐C6  carbon structure consisting of two phenyl rings (A and B) and a heterocyclic ring (C). Generally, it  was  observed  that  at  least  one  hydroxyl  group  in  the  ring  A  (especially  at  C‐7)  is  vital  for  the  antibacterial  activity  of  flavones,  and  in  another  position  such  as  C‐5  and  C‐6  can  increase  this  biological effect [85]. In this context, it is interesting to compare our results regarding the antibacterial  activity of flavones with the hydroxyl groups at C‐5 and C‐7 (chrysin, apigenin, luteolin, and their  glycosides) and flavone devoid of them. Just like other chemicals from this flavonoid class, flavone  showed moderate inhibitory influence on the growth of E. coli and P. aeruginosa (MIC = 500 μg/mL).  The same level of flavone activity was found against E. faecalis, and it was the highest value among  the  flavonoids  tested.  Only  against  S.  aureus,  the  above‐mentioned  substance  was  inactive  at  concentrations  tested  (15.6–1000 μg/mL).  Furthermore,  we  observed  that  a  number  of  hydroxyl  groups at two aromatic rings do not correspond with higher antimicrobial activity of flavonoids, i.e.,  quercetin has five hydroxyl groups, but it was not active against E. faecalis, S. aureus, and P. aeruginosa.  In addition, some studies displayed a low effect of quercetin on B. subtilis, E. cloacae, E. coli, and K.  pneumoniae [86]. The structure‐activity relationships of flavonoids were discussed by Xie et al. [87],  and it was summarized that two hydroxyl substituents on C‐5 and C‐7 of ring A of quercetin, rutin,  and naringenin lead to their antibacterial activities. Moreover, it was found that the saturation of the  C2=C3 double bond (in naringin) increased the antibacterial activity. However, in our study naringin  was the most active against P. aeruginosa only in comparison with kaempferol and quercetin. On the  other side, a recent study showed that the presence of glycosyl conjugated groups to polyphenols  may reduce antibacterial activity [88]. We showed that glycosides of flavonoids (vitexin, vitexin 2″‐ O‐rhamnoside, isovitexin, orientin, isoorientin, naringin, rutin) have some antibacterial effects (Table  2). The aglycone apigenin exhibited higher activity against S. aureus in comparison with its glycosides  vitexin,  isovitexin,  and  vitexin  2″‐O‐rhamnoside,  however  the  aglycon  luteolin  had  the  same  antibacterial effects on all bacterial strains as its C‐glucosides orientin and isoorientin.  According to the literature, the level of sensitivity of the bacterial species studied by us to plant  substances is very diverse and strongly depends not only on the type of active compound but also on  the selected strains, as shown by comparative analyses in this regard [5,53]. It may also affect large  discrepancies  in  the  results  between  individual  investigations.  Some  literature  data  suggest  that  standard strains are generally much more sensitive to antibiotics and natural plant compounds than  current clinical isolates. For example, the MIC values of quercetin, apigenin, naringin, chlorogenic,  and quinic acids for E. coli ATCC 35218, P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145, S. aureus ATCC 25923, and E.  faecalis ATCC 29212 reached 2–16 μg/mL, while for the clinical strains it ranged between 32 and 128  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  11  of  16  μg/mL  or  above  this  [5].  In  turn,  research  conducted  by  Su  et  al.  [53]  showed  a  slightly  higher  sensitivity of some clinical isolates of methicillin‐resistant S. aureus to luteolin and quercetin (MIC =  31.2–62.5 μg/mL) than methicillin‐sensitive strains (MIC = 125 μg/mL). In the study of Morimoto et  al. [89], quinolone‐resistant S. aureus Mu50 was much more sensitive to apigenin (MIC = 4 μg/mL)  than quinolone‐susceptible S. aureus strain FDA 209P (MIC > 128 μg/mL). Compared to the above‐ cited works [5,89], it was interesting that apigenin and chlorogenic acid were practically inactive  (MIC > 4000 μg/mL) against all 34 strains of S. aureus tested by Su et al. [53]. Our investigations  exhibited the moderate or weak activity of these two compounds against S. aureus (MIC = 500–1000  μg/mL). A recent review of the literature [33] showed that chlorogenic acid has a broad spectrum of  antimicrobial activity, but its effect is very diverse. This phenolic acid strongly inhibited the growth  of E. faecalis (MIC = 64 μg/mL), while it was inactive against P. aeruginosa (MIC80 = 10,000 μg/mL). For  S. aureus and E. coli, its MIC values ranged from 40–80 to 10,000 μg/mL. The above data are largely  consistent  with  the  results  of  the  current  work  (Table  2).  We  exhibited  the  moderate  activity  of  chlorogenic acid against E. coli (MIC = 500 μg/mL) and confirmed the lack of significant influence of  this substance on P. aeruginosa at the concentrations tested (MIC > 1000 μg/mL).  In addition to chlorogenic acid, we also studied the biological influence of other phenolic acids:  rosmarinic  and  salicylic  ones.  In  addition,  their  antibacterial  activity  was  compared  with  some  aliphatic acids: citric, malic, and quinic. Generally, there were no clear differences in the activity of  these two groups of substances. However, the simple phenolic compound salicylic acid showed the  highest activity with the MIC values of 250–500 μg/mL. Many studies proved that rosmarinic acid  has an antimicrobial effect on Gram‐positive and Gram‐negative bacteria [65,71,90]. Sometimes, the  level  of  this  activity  was  not  high.  Recently,  Akhtar  et  al.  [65]  indicated  the  moderate  growth  inhibition zones of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa (13 mm in diameter), S. aureus (12 mm), Proteus  vulgaris  (11  mm),  and  E.  coli  (10  mm)  at  1 μg/mL  concentration  of  rosmarinic  acid.  Similarly,  Matejczyk et al. [71] observed a not very strong antibacterial effect of this phenolic acid on E. coli  (MIC > 250 μg/mL), Bacillus sp. (MIC > 500 μg/mL), S. epidermidis (MIC > 500 μg/mL), and S. pyogenes  (MIC  >  500 μg/mL)  in  comparison  with  an  antibiotic  kanamycin  (MIC  >  100 μg/mL).  In  turn,  Ekambaram et al. [69] demonstrated the MIC values of rosmarinic acid against S. aureus and MRSA  on the level of 800 and 10,000 μg/mL, respectively. Blaskovich et al. [54] carried out experimental  research and made a critical review of the antimicrobial activity of salicylic acid. Results of these  studies  demonstrated  that  salicylic  acid  was  practically  inactive  against  various  bacterial  strains,  including  B.  subtilis  ATCC  6633,  E.  faecalis  ATCC  29212,  S.  aureus,  MSSA  ATCC  25923,  and  S.  pneumoniae ATCC 33400 (MIC = 32,000 μg/mL). The antibacterial properties are relatively well known  for  small  aliphatic  molecules  tested  by  us:  citric,  malic,  and  quinic  acids  [91–93].  Investigations  concerning the effect of quinic acid on cellular functions of S. aureus demonstrated that this organic  acid could significantly decrease the intracellular pH and ATP concentration, and also reduce the  DNA content [93]. Citric acid was previously shown to have the MICs of 900 μg/mL for S. aureus and  1500 μg/mL for E. coli, and to be very effective in the treatment of chronic wound infections in a dose  of 3 g of citric acid dissolved in 100 mL of distilled water [91]. In turn, Gao et al. [85] demonstrated  no clear activity of citric and malic acids against E. coli (MIC = 1667 and 2000 μg/mL, respectively) B.  subtilis (MIC = 2000 μg/mL), and S. suis (MIC = 8000 and 6667 μg/mL). However, Jensen et al. [92]  exhibited  that  cranberry  juice  and  its  main  compounds  (citric,  malic,  quinic,  and  shikimic  acids)  reduce E. coli colonization of the bladder. These organic acids decreased bacterial levels when they  were administered together or in a combination of malic acid and citric or quinic ones. Our research  confirmed the antibacterial activity of citric, malic, and quinic acids not only against E. coli (MIC =  500 μg/mL), but also against P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis (Table 2).  5. Conclusions  Our  research  confirmed  the  antibacterial  activity  of  all  tested  plant  compounds.  With  the  exception of kaempferol and quercetin, they showed a biological effect against clinical strains of 3–4  bacterial species. Microbiological screening of flavonoids and organic acids allowed to exhibit some  interesting details and relationships. First of all, these metabolites were generally more potent against  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  12  of  16  Gram‐negative bacteria: E. coli and P. aeruginosa than Gram‐positive ones: E. faecalis and S. aureus. On  the  other  hand,  the  comparative  study  of  antibacterial  activity  of  flavone,  chrysin,  apigenin,  and  luteolin demonstrated that the presence of hydroxyl groups in the phenyl rings A (C‐5, C‐7) and B  (C‐3′, C‐4′) usually did not affect the activity level of flavones. Only in the case of S. aureus, a clear  increase in the activity of the hydroxy derivatives of flavone was observed. Similarly, the presence  and position of the sugar group in the flavone glycosides generally had no effect on the MIC values.  A comparison of our results with the literature data exhibited that the level of sensitivity of the  bacterial species to plant substances is very diverse, and strongly depends not only on the type of  active compounds but also on the strains tested. Moreover, it seems that current clinical isolates are  generally  much  less  sensitive  to  the  natural  plant  metabolites  than  standard  strains.  Numerous  standard strains have been isolated many years ago, therefore, with the currently growing resistance  of bacteria, their use for the screening microbiological tests is limited. In our investigations, we found  the  moderate  or  even  low  activity  of  flavonoids  and  organic  acids  compared  to  the  traditional  antibiotics and some plant substances. However, examples of the use of natural compounds with a  relatively low in vitro activity in the treatment of urinary tract infections, chronic wound infections,  etc. or as food additives show that widely distributed flavonoids and organic acids could find broad  practical applications.  Author  Contributions:  Conceptualization,  A.A.  and  T.M.K.;  methodology,  A.A.  and  T.M.K.;  reagents  and  investigation, A.A., M.O., and T.M.K.; visualization of chemical structures, T.M.K.; literature search, A.A., and  M.O.; writing—original draft preparation, A.A., and M.O.; writing—review and editing, A.A., and M.O. All  authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding:  This  research  was  funded  from  the  budget  of  the  Department  of  Medical  Microbiology,  Poznań  University of Medical Sciences and the Polish Multiannual Programme entitled ‘Creating the scientific basis of  the  biological  progress  and  conservation  of  plant  genetic  resources  as  a  source  of  innovation  to  support  sustainable agriculture and food security of the country’.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Chandra, H.; Bishnoi, P.; Yadav, A.; Patni, B.; Mishra, A.P.; Nautiyal, A.R. Antimicrobial resistance and the  alternative resources with special emphasis on plant‐based antimicrobials–A review. Plants 2017, 6, 16.  2. Gupta, P.D.; Birdi, T.J. Development of botanicals to combat antibiotic resistance. J. Ayur. Integr. Med. 2017,  8, 266–275.  3. Mate, A. (Ed.) Medicinal and Aromatic Plants of the World. Scientific, Production, Commercial and Utilization  Aspects; Springer Science + Business Media: Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 2015; Volume 1.  4. Zheng,  J.;  Huang,  C.;  Yang,  B.;  Kallio,  H.  Regulation  of  phytochemicals  in  fruits  and  berries  by  environmental variation—Sugars and organic acids. J. Food Biochem. 2019, 43, e12642.  5. Özçelik, B.; Kartal, M.; Orhan, I. Cytotoxicity, antiviral and antimicrobial activities of alkaloids, flavonoids,  and phenolic acids. Pharm. Biol. 2011, 49, 396–402.  6. Barbieri,  R.;  Coppo,  E.;  Marchese,  A.;  Daglia,  M.;  Sobarzo‐Sánchez,  E.;  Nabavi,  S.F.;  Nabavi,  S.M.  Phytochemicals  for  human  disease:  An  update  on  plant‐derived  compounds  antibacterial  activity.  Microbiol. Res. 2017, 196, 44–68.  7. Fialova, S.; Rendekova, K.; Mucaji, P.; Slobodnikova, L. Plant natural agents: Polyphenols, alkaloids and  essential oils as perspective solution of microbial resistance. Curr. Org. Chem. 2017, 21, 1875–1884.  8. Khameneh, B.; Iranshahy, M.; Soheili, V.; Bazzaz, B.S.F. Review on plant antimicrobials: A mechanistic  viewpoint. Antimicrob. Resist. Infect. Control. 2019, 8, 118.  9. Gutiérrez‐Grijalva, E.P.; Picos‐Salas, M.A.; Leyva‐López, N.; Criollo‐Mendoza, M.S.; Vazquez‐Olivo, G.;  Heredia,  J.B.  Flavonoids  and  phenolic  acids  from  oregano:  Occurrence,  biological  activity  and  health  benefits. Plants 2018, 7, 2.  10. Jungbauer, A.; Medjakovic, S. Anti‐inflammatory properties of culinary herbs and spices that ameliorate  the effects of metabolic syndrome. Maturitas 2012, 71, 227–239.  11. Goncalves, S.; Moreira, E.; Grosso, C.; Andrade, P.B.; Valentao, P.; Romano, A. Phenolic profile, antioxidant  activity and enzyme inhibitory activities of extracts from aromatic plants used in mediterranean diet. J.  Food Sci. Technol. 2017, 54, 219–227.  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  13  of  16  12. Mileo,  A.M.;  Nisticò,  P.;  Miccadei,  S.  Polyphenols:  Immunomodulatory  and  therapeutic  implication  in  colorectal cancer. Front. Immunol. 2019, 10, 729.  13. Singh, A.K.; Cabral, C.; Kumar, R.; Ganguly, R.; Rana, H.K.; Gupta, A.; Lauro, M.R.; Carbone, C.; Reis, F.;  Pandey, A.K. Beneficial effects of dietary polyphenols on gut microbiota and strategies to improve delivery  efficiency. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2216.  14. Wang,  M.;  Firrman,  J.;  Liu,  L.Sh.;  Yam,  K.  A  review  on  flavonoid  apigenin:  Dietary  intake,  ADME,  antimicrobial effects, and interactions with human gut microbiota. BioMed Res. Int. 2019, 2019, 7010467.  15. Chua,  L.S.  A  review  on  plant‐based  rutin  extraction  methods  and  its  pharmacological  activities.  J.  Ethnopharmacol. 2013, 150, 805–817.  16. Enogieru, A.B.; Haylett, W.; Hiss, D.Ch.; Bardien, S.; Ekpo, O.E. Rutin as a potent antioxidant: Implications  for neurodegenerative disorders. Oxid. Med. Cell Longev. 2018, 2018, 6241017.  17. Edwards, J.E.; Brown, P.N.; Talent, N.; Dickinson, T.A.; Shipley, P.R. A review of the chemistry of the genus  Crataegus. Phytochemistry 2012, 79, 5–26.  18. Yamaguchi,  K.K.L.;  Pereira,  L.F.R.;  Lamarão,  C.V.;  Lima,  E.S.;  da  Veiga‐Junior,  V.F.  Amazon  acai:  Chemistry and biological activities: A review. Food Chem. 2015, 179, 137–151.  19. Yuan,  L.;  Wang,  J.;  Wu,  W.;  Liu,  Q.;  Liu,  X.  Effect  of  isoorientin  on  intracellular  antioxidant  defence  mechanisms in hepatoma and liver cell lines. Biomed. Pharmacother. 2016, 81, 356–362.  20. Mani, R.; Natesan, V. Chrysin: Sources, beneficial pharmacological activities, and molecular mechanism of  action. Phytochemistry 2018, 145, 187–196.  21. Ożarowski,  M.;  Piasecka,  A.;  Paszel‐Jaworska,  A.;  Chaves,  D.S.;  Romaniuk,  A.;  Rybczyńska,  M.;  Gryszczynska,  A.;  Sawikowska,  A.;  Kachlicki,  P.;  Mikolajczak,  P.L.;  et  al.  Comparison  of  bioactive  compounds  content in leaf extracts  of  Passiflora incarnata, P.  caerulea  and P. alata  and in vitro  cytotoxic  potential on leukemia cell lines. Rev. Bras. Farmacogn. 2018, 28, 79–191.  22. Naz, S.; Imran, M.; Rauf, A.; Orhan, I.E.; Shariati, M.A.; Haq, I.U.; Yasmin, I.; Shahbaz, M.; Qaisrani, T.B.;  Shah, Z.A.; et al. Chrysin: Pharmacological and therapeutic properties. Life Sci. 2019, 235, 116797.  23. Przybyłek, I.; Karpiński, T.M. Antibacterial properties of propolis. Molecules 2019, 24, 2047.  24. Alam, M.A.; Subhan, N.; Rahman, M.M.; Uddin, S.J.; Reza, H.M.; Sarker, S.D. Effect of Citrus flavonoids,  naringin and naringenin, on metabolic syndrome and their mechanisms of action. Adv. Nutr. 2014, 5, 404– 417.  25. Viljakainen, S.; Visti, A.; Laakso, S. Concentrations of organic acids and soluble sugars in juices from Nordic  berries. Acta Agric. Scand. Sect. B Soil Plant Sci. 2002, 52, 101–109.  26. Pande, G.; Akoh, C.C. Organic acids, antioxidant capacity, phenolic content and lipid characterisation of  Georgia‐grown underutilized fruit crops. Food Chem. 2010, 120, 1067–1075.  27. Nour, V.; Trandafir, I.; Ionica, M.E. Ascorbic acid, anthocyanins, organic acids and mineral content of some  black and red currant cultivars. Fruits 2011, 66, 353–362.  28. Kaume, L.; Howard, L.R.; Devareddy, L. The blackberry fruit: A review on its composition and chemistry,  metabolism and bioavailability, and health benefits. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2012, 60, 5716–5727.  29. Wang, Y.; Johnson‐Cicalese, J.; Singh, A.P.; Vorsa, N. Characterization and quantification of flavonoids and  organic acids over fruit development in American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) cultivars using HPLC  and APCI‐MS/MS. Plant Sci. 2017, 262, 91–102.  30. Denev, P.; Kratchanova, M.; Petrova, I.; Klisurova, D.; Georgiev, Y.; Ognyanov, M.; Yanakieva, I. Black  chokeberry  (Aronia  melanocarpa  (Michx.)  Elliot)  fruits  and  functional  drinks  differ  significantly  in  their  chemical composition and antioxidant activity. J. Chem. 2018, 2018, 9574587.  31. Adamczak, A.; Buchwald, W.; Kozłowski, J. Variation in the content of flavonols and main organic acids in  the fruit of European cranberry (Oxycoccus palustris Pers.) growing in peatlands of North‐Western Poland.  Herba Pol. 2011, 57, 5–15.  32. Jurikova, T.; Mlcek, J.; Skrovankova, S.; Sumczynski, D.; Sochor, J.; Hlavacova, I.; Snopek, L.; Orsavova, J.  Fruits of black chokeberry Aronia melanocarpa in the prevention of chronic diseases. Molecules 2017, 22, 944.  33. Santana‐Gálvez, J.; Cisneros‐Zevallos, L.; Jacobo‐Velázquez, D.A. Chlorogenic Acid: Recent advances on  its dual role as a food additive and a nutraceutical against metabolic syndrome. Molecules 2017, 22, 358.  34. Meinhart, A.D.; Damin, F.M.; Caldeirao, L.; Silveira, T.F.F.; Filho, J.T.; Godoy, H.T. Chlorogenic acid isomer  contents in 100 plants commercialized in Brazil. Food Res. Int. 2017, 99, 522–530.  35. Shekarchi,  M.;  Hajimehdipoor,  H.;  Saeidnia,  S.;  Gohari,  A.R.;  Hamedani,  M.P.  Comparative  study  of  rosmarinic acid content in some plants of Labiatae family. Pharmacogn. Mag. 2012, 8, 37–41.  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  14  of  16  36. Ożarowski, M.; Mikołajczak, P.; Bogacz, A.; Gryszczyńska, A.; Kujawska, M.; Jodynis‐Libert, J.; Piasecka,  A.; Napieczynska, H.; Szulc, M.; Kujawski, R.; et al. Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaf extract improves memory  impairment  and  affects  acetylcholinesterase  and  butyrylcholinesterase  activities  in  rat  brain.  Fitoterapia  2013, 91, 261–271.  37. Ożarowski,  M.;  Mikolajczak,  P.L.;  Piasecka,  A.;  Kachlicki,  P.;  Kujawski,  R.;  Bogacz,  A.;  Bartkowiak‐ Wieczorek, J.; Szulc, M.; Kaminska, E.; Kujawska, M.; et al. Influence of the Melissa officinalis leaf extract on  long‐term  memory  in  scopolamine  animal  model  with  assessment  of  mechanism  of  action.  Evid. Based  Complem. Alternat. Med. 2016, 2016, 9729818.  38. Balcke, G.U.; Handrick, V.; Bergau, N.; Fichtner, M.; Henning, A.; Stellmach, H.; Tissier, A.; Hause, B.;  Frolov, A. An UPLC‐MS/MS method for highly sensitive high‐throughput analysis of phytohormones in  plant tissues. Plant Methods 2012, 8, 47.  39. Toiu, A.; Vlase, L.; Oniga, I.; Benedec, D.; Tămaş, M. HPLC analysis of salicylic derivatives from natural  products. Farmacia 2011, 59, 106–112.  40. Bijttebier, S.; van der Auwera, A.; Voorspoels, S.; Noten, B.; Hermans, N.; Pieters, L.; Apers, S. A first step  in  the  quest  for  the  active  constituents  in  Filipendula  ulmaria  (meadowsweet):  Comprehensive  phytochemical  identification  by  liquid  chromatography  coupled  to  quadrupole‐orbitrap  mass  spectrometry. Planta Med. 2016, 82, 559–572.  41. Nabavi,  S.F.;  Habtemariam,  S.;  Ahmed,  T.;  Sureda,  A.;  Daglia,  M.;  Sobarzo‐Sánchez,  E.;  Nabavi,  S.M.  Polyphenolic composition of Crataegus monogyna Jacq.: From chemistry to medical applications. Nutrients  2015, 7, 7708–7728.  42. Kerasioti, E.; Apostolou, A.; Kafantaris, I.; Chronis, K.; Kokka, E.; Dimitriadou, C.; Tzanetou, E.N.; Priftis,  A.; Koulocheri, S.D.; Haroutounian, S.; et al. Polyphenolic composition of Rosa canina, Rosa sempervivens  and Pyrocantha coccinea extracts and assessment of their antioxidant activity in human endothelial cells.  Antioxidants 2019, 8, 92.  43. Cho, J.W.; Cho, S.Y.; Lee, S.R.; Lee, K.S. Onion extract and quercetin induce matrix metalloproteinase‐1 in  vitro and in vivo. Int. J. Mol. Med. 2010, 25, 347–352.  44. Chuang,  S.Y.;  Lin,  Y.K.;  Lin,  C.F.;  Wang,  P.W.;  Chen,  E.L.;  Fang,  J.Y.  Elucidating  the  skin  delivery  of  aglycone  and  glycoside  flavonoids:  How  the  structures  affect  cutaneous  absorption.  Nutrients  2017,  9,  E1304.  45. Nagoba, B.S.; Suryawanshi, N.M.; Wadher, B.; Selkar, S. Acidic environment and wound healing: A review.  Wounds 2015, 27, 5–11.  46. Nagoba, B.; Davane, M.; Gandhi, R.; Wadher, B.; Suryawanshi, N.; Selkar, S. Treatment of skin and soft  tissue infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa—A review of our experiences with citric acid over the  past 20 years. Wound Med. 2017, 19, 5–9.  47. Bessa, L.J.; Fazii, P.; Di Giulio, M.; Cellini, L. Bacterial isolates from infected wounds and their antibiotic  susceptibility pattern: Some remarks about wound infection. Int. Wound J. 2013, 12, 47–52.  48. Karpiński, T.M. Efficacy of octenidine against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Eur. J. Biol. Res. 2019, 9, 135– 140.  49. CLSI.  Performance  Standards  for  Antimicrobial  Disk  Susceptibility  Tests.  Approved  Standard,  12th  ed.;  CLSI  document M02‐A12; Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute: Wayne, PA, USA, 2015; Volume 35, no 1.  50. EUCAST.  MIC  Determination  of  Non‐Fastidious  and  Fastidious  Organisms.  Available  online:  http://www.eucast.org/ast_of_bacteria/mic_determination (accessed on 26 July 2019).  51. Karpiński, T.M.; Adamczak, A. Fucoxanthin—An antibacterial carotenoid. Antioxidants 2019, 8, 239.  52. Gao, Z.; Shao, J.; Sun, H.; Zhong, W.; Zhuang, W.; Zhang, Z. Evaluation of different kinds of organic acids  and their antibacterial activity in Japanese Apricot fruits. Afr. J. Agric. Res. 2012, 7, 4911–4918.  53. Su,  Y.;  Ma,  L.;  Wen,  Y.;  Wang,  H.;  Zhang,  S.  Studies  of  the  in  vitro  antibacterial  activities  of  several  polyphenols against clinical isolates of methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Molecules 2014, 19, 12630– 12639.  54. Blaskovich, M.A.; Elliott, A.G.; Kavanagh, A.M.; Ramu, S.; Cooper, M.A. In vitro antimicrobial activity of  acne drugs against skin‐associated bacteria. Sci. Rep. 2019, 9, 14658.  55. Basile, A.; Giordano, S.; López‐Sáez, J.A.; Cobianchi, R.C. Antibacterial activity of pure flavonoids isolated  from mosses. Phytochemistry 1999, 52, 1479–1482.  56. Afifi, F.U.; Abu‐Dahab, R. Phytochemical screening and biological activities of Eminium spiculatum (Blume)  Kuntze (family Araceae). Nat. Prod. Res. 2012, 26, 878–882.  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  15  of  16  57. Das,  M.C.;  Sandhu,  P.;  Gupta,  P.;  Rudrapaul,  P.;  De,  U.C.;  Tribedi,  P.;  Akhter,  Y.;  Bhattacharjee,  S.  Attenuation  of  Pseudomonas  aeruginosa  biofilm  formation  by  vitexin:  A  combinatorial  study  with  azithromycin and gentamicin. Sci. Rep. 2016, 6, 23347.  58. Das, M.C.; Das, A.; Samaddar, S.; Dawarea, A.V.; Ghosh, C.; Acharjee, S.; Sandhu, P.; Jawed, J.J.; De Utpal,  C.; Majumdar, S.; et al. Vitexin alters Staphylococcus aureus surface hydrophobicity to interfere with biofilm  2 formation. bioRxiv. 2018, doi:10.1101/301473.  59. Awolola,  G.V.;  Koorbanally,  N.A.;  Chenia,  H.;  Shode,  F.O.;  Baijnath,  H.  Antibacterial  and  anti‐biofilm  activity of flavonoids and triterpenes isolated from the extracts of Ficus sansibarica Warb. subsp. Sansibarica  (Moraceae) extracts. Afr. J. Tradit. Complem. Altern. Med. 2014, 11, 124–131.  60. Rammohan, A.; Bhaskar, B.V.; Venkateswarlu, N.; Rao, V.L.; Gunasekar, D.; Zyryanov, G.V. Isolation of  flavonoids from the flowers of Rhynchosia beddomei Baker as prominent antimicrobial agents and molecular  docking. Microb. Pathog. 2019, 136, 103667.  61. Aderogba, M.A.; Akinkunmi, E.O.; Mabusela, W.T. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of flavonoid  glycosides from Dennettia tripetala G. Baker leaf extract. Nig. J. Nat. Prod. Med. 2011, 15, 49–52.  62. Cottiglia, F.; Loy, G.; Garau, D.; Floris, C.; Casu, M.; Pompei, R.; Bonsignore, L. Antimicrobial evaluation  of coumarins and flavonoids from the stems of Daphne gnidium L. Phytomedicine 2001, 8, 302–305.  63. Ali, H.; Dixit, S. In vitro antimicrobial activity of flavanoids of Ocimum sanctum with synergistic effect of  their combined form. Asian Pac. J. Trop. Dis. 2012, 2, S396–S398.  64. Celiz, G.; Daz, M.; Audisio, M.C. Antibacterial activity of naringin derivatives against pathogenic strains.  J. Appl. Microbiol. 2011, 111, 731–738.  65. Akhtar, M.S.; Hossain, M.A.; Said, S.A. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compound from the  stem‐bark of the traditionally used medicinal plant Adenium obesum. J. Tradit. Complem. Med. 2017, 7, 296– 300.  66. Singh, M.; Govindarajan, R.; Rawat, A.K.S.; Khare, P.B. Antimicrobial flavonoid rutin from Pteris vittata L.  against pathogenic gastrointestinal microflora. Am. Fern J. 2008, 98, 98–103.  67. Liu, H.; Mou, Y.; Zhao, J.; Wang, J.; Zhou, L.; Wang, M.; Wang, D.; Han, J.; Yu, Z.; Yang, F. Flavonoids from  Halostachys caspica and their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Molecules 2010, 15, 7933–7945.  68. Banerjee, K.; Banerjee, S.; Das, S.; Mandal, M. Probing the potential of apigenin liposomes in enhancing  bacterial membrane perturbation and integrity loss. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 2015, 453, 48–59.  69. Ekambaram,  S.P.;  Perumal,  S.S.;  Balakrishnan,  A.;  Marappan,  N.;  Gajendran,  S.S.;  Viswanathan,  V.  Antibacterial synergy between rosmarinic acid and antibiotics against methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus  aureus. J. Intercult. Ethnopharmacol. 2016, 5, 358–363.  70. Smiljkovic, M.; Stanisavljevic, D.; Stojkovic, D.; Petrovic, I.; Vicentic, M.J.; Popovic, J.; Golic Grdadolnik, S.;  Markovic, D.; Sankovic‐Babice, S.; Glamoclija, J.; et al. Apigenin‐7‐O‐glucoside versus apigenin: Insight into  the modes of anticandidal and cytotoxic actions. EXCLI J. 2017, 16, 795–807.  71. Matejczyk,  M.;  Swisłocka,  R.;  Golonko,  A.;  Lewandowski,  W.;  Hawrylik,  E.  Cytotoxic,  genotoxic  and  antimicrobial  activity of  caffeic  and rosmarinic  acids and  their  lithium, sodium and  potassium salts  as  potential anticancer compounds. Adv. Med. Sci. 2018, 63, 14–21.  72. Ren,  G.;  Xue,  P.;  Sun,  X.;  Zhao,  G.  Determination  of  the  volatile  and  polyphenol  constituents  and  the  antimicrobial, antioxidant, and tyrosinase inhibitory activities of the bioactive compounds from the by‐ product of Rosa rugosa Thunb. var. plena Regal tea. BMC Complem. Altern. Med. 2018, 18, 307.  73. Huang,  C.Y.  Inhibition  of  a  putative  dihydropyrimidinase  from  Pseudomonas  aeruginosa  PAO1  by  flavonoids and substrates of cyclic amidohydrolases. PLoS ONE. 2015, 10, e0127634.  74. Bustos,  P.S.;  Deza‐Ponzio,  R.;  Páez,  P.L.;  Cabrera,  J.L.;  Virgolini,  M.B.;  Ortega,  M.G.  Flavonoids  as  protective agents against oxidative stress induced by gentamicin in systemic circulation. Potent protective  activity and microbial synergism of luteolin. Food Chem Toxicol. 2018, 118, 294–302.  75. Xie,  Y.;  Yang,  W.;  Tang,  F.;  Chen,  X.;  Ren,  L.  Antibacterial  activities  of  flavonoids:  Structure‐activity  relationship and mechanism. Curr. Med. Chem. 2015, 22, 132–149.  76. Górniak, I.; Bartoszewski, R.; Króliczewski, J. Comprehensive review of antimicrobial activities of plant  flavonoids. Phytochem. Rev. 2019, 18, 241–272.  77. Ohemeng, K.A.; Schwender, C.F.; Fu, K.P.; Barrett, J.F. DNA gyrase inhibitory and antibacterial activity of  some flavones. Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 1993, 3, 225–230.  J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 109  16  of  16  78. Lee, J.H.; Regmi, S.C.; Kim, J.A.; Cho, M.H.; Yun, H.; Lee, C.S.; Lee, J. Apple flavonoid phloretin inhibits  Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation and ameliorates colon inflammation in rats. Infect. Immun. 2011,  79, 4819–4827.  79. Siriwong, S.; Thumanu, K.; Hengpratom, T.; Eumkeb, G. Synergy and mode ofaction of ceftazidime plus  quercetin or luteolin on Streptococcus pyogenes. Evid. Based Complem. Altern. Med. 2015, 2015, 759459.  80. Betts,  J.W.;  Sharili,  A.S.;  Phee,  L.M.;  Wareham,  D.W.  In  vitro  activity  of  epigallocatechin  gallate  and  quercetin alone and in combination versus clinical isolates of methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus. J.  Nat. Prod. 2015, 78, 2145–2148.  81. Hossion,  A.M.;  Zamami,  Y.;  Kandahary,  R.K.;  Tsuchiya,  T.;  Ogawa,  W.;  Iwado,  A.  Quercetin  diacylglycoside  analogues  showing  dual  inhibition  of  DNA  gyrase  and  topoisomerase  IV  as  novel  antibacterial agents. J. Med. Chem. 2011, 54, 3686–3703.  82. Chen, C.C.; Huang, C.Y. Inhibition of Klebsiella pneumoniae DnaB helicase by the flavonol galangin. Protein  J. 2011, 30, 59–65.  83. Lin, H.H.; Huang,  C.Y. Characterization of flavonol inhibition  of DnaB helicase: Real‐time monitoring,  structural modeling, and proposed mechanism. J. Biomed. Biotechnol. 2012, 2012, 735368.  84. Huang,  Y.H.;  Huang,  C.C.;  Chen,  C.C.;  Yang,  K.;  Huang,  C.Y.  Inhibition  of  Staphylococcus  aureus  PriA  helicase by flavonol kaempferol. Protein J. 2015, 34, 169–172.  85. Farhadi,  F.;  Khameneh,  B.;  Iranshahi,  M.;  Iranshahy,  M.  Antibacterial  activity  of  flavonoids  and  their  structure‐activity relationship: An update review. Phytother. Res. 2019, 33, 13–40.  86. Echeverría,  J.;  Opazo,  J.;  Mendoza,  L.;  Urzúa,  A.;  Wilkens,  M.  Structure‐activity  and  lipophilicity  relationships of selected antibacterial natural flavones and flavanones of chilean flora. Molecules 2017, 22,  608.  87. Xie, Y.; Chen, J.; Xiao, A.; Liu, L. Antibacterial activity of polyphenols: Structure‐activity relationship and  influence of hyperglycemic condition. Molecules 2017, 22, 1913.  88. Bouarab‐Chibane, L.; Forquet, V.; Lantéri, P.; Clément, Y.; Léonard‐Akkari, L.; Oulahal, N.; Degraeve, P.;  Bordes, C. Antibacterial properties of polyphenols: Characterization and QSAR (Quantitative Structure– Activity Relationship) models. Front. Microbiol. 2019, 10, 829.  89. Morimoto, Y.; Baba, T.; Sasaki, T.; Hiramatsu, K. Apigenin as an anti‐quinolone‐resistance antibiotic. Int. J.  Antimicrob. Agents. 2015, 46, 666–673.  90. Amin, A.; Vincent, R.; Séverine, M. Rosmarinic acid and its methyl ester as antimicrobial components of  the hydromethanolic extract of Hyptis atrorubens Poit. (Lamiaceae). Evid. Based Complem. Alternat. Med. 2013,  2013, 604536.  91. Nagoba, B.S.; Gandhi, R.C.; Wadher, B.J.; Potekar, R.M.; Kolhe, S.M. Microbiological, histopathological and  clinical changes in chronic infected wounds after citric acid treatment. J. Med. Microbiol. 2008, 57, 681–682.  92. Jensen, H.D.; Struve, C.; Christensen, S.B.; Krogfelt, K.A. Cranberry juice and combinations of its organic  acids are effective against experimental urinary tract infection. Front. Microbiol. 2017, 8, 542.  93. Bai, J.; Wu, Y.; Zhong, K.; Xiao, K.; Liu, L.; Huang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Gao, H. A comparative study on the effects  of quinic acid and shikimic acid on cellular functions of Staphylococcus aureus. J. Food Prot. 2018, 81, 1187– 1192.  © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access  article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution  (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). 

Journal

Journal of Clinical MedicineMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Dec 31, 2019

There are no references for this article.