Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Effects of Different Storage Conditions on the Browning Degree, PPO Activity, and Content of Chemical Components in Fresh Lilium Bulbs (Lilium brownii F.E.Brown var. viridulum Baker)

Effects of Different Storage Conditions on the Browning Degree, PPO Activity, and Content of... Article  Effects of Different Storage Conditions on the Browning   Degree, PPO Activity, and Content of Chemical Components   in Fresh Lilium Bulbs (Lilium brownii F.E.Brown var.   viridulum Baker)  1,2 1,2  1,2 1,2, Kanghong Zhao  , Zhengpeng Xiao  , Jianguo Zeng  and Hongqi Xie  *    National and Reginal Joint Engineering Research Centre for Veterinary Traditional Chinese Medicine   Resources and Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine Innovation, Hunan Agricultural University,  Changsha 410128, China; kanghongz@163.com (K.Z.); x2300379299@163.com (Z.X.);  zengjianguo@hunau.edu.cn (J.Z.)    National Technology Center (Hunan) for Traditional Chinese Medicine Production, Hunan Agricultural  University, Changsha 410128, China  *  Correspondence: xiehongqi@hunau.edu.cn; Tel.: +86‐158‐7400‐1185  Abstract: Although Lilium brownii (L.brownii) bulbs are popular fresh vegetables, a series of quality  problems still remain after harvest. In this study, fresh L.brownii bulbs were placed in the dark at  25, 4, and −20 °C and under light at 25 °C from 0 to 30 days; the chemical compositions were ana‐ lyzed  by  ultraviolet  spectrophotometry  (UV)  and  high‐performance  liquid  chromatography  quadrupole time‐of‐flight mass spectrometry (HPLC‐Q‐TOF‐MS). During the 30‐day storage pe‐ Citation: Zhao, K.; Xiao, Z.; Zeng, J.;  riod, the browning degree increased over the storage time and with increasing temperature, but  Xie, H. Effects of Different Storage  the contents of proteins and free amino acids decreased and were aggravated by light. The total  Conditions on the Browning Degree,  polyphenol content increased until the 6th day at 25 °C (dark or light), but it did not significantly  PPO Activity, and Content of  accumulate at −20 or 4 °C. The reducing sugar content showed a dynamic balance, but the total  Chemical Components in Fresh  polysaccharide content decreased constantly in the four storage conditions. The polyphenol oxi‐ Lilium Bulbs (Lilium brownii  dase (PPO) activity increased with storage time and increasing temperature, while it was inhibited  F.E.Brown var. viridulum Baker.).  by light. The increase rates of malondialdehyde (MDA) content at −20 °C and light (25 °C) were  Agriculture 2021, 11, 184.  higher than those at 4 and 25 °C. In addition, 12 secondary metabolites were identified, most of  https://doi.org/10.3390/  which  accumulated  during  the  storage  period,  for  example,  agriculture11020184  1‐O‐feruloyl‐3‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol;  1,3‐O‐di‐p‐coumaroylglycerol;  1‐O‐feruloyl‐3‐O‐p‐coumaroylglycerol;  and  1,2‐O‐diferuloylglycerol.  The  variations  in  nutrient  Received: 21 January 2021  levels had a low correlation with browning, but the variations in MDA, PPO, and secondary me‐ Accepted: 20 February 2021  tabolite (phenolic acids) levels had a high correlation with browning. In conclusion, fresh L.brownii  Published: 23 February 2021  bulbs should be stored at a low temperature (4 °C) and in dark condition, and browning bulbs are  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neu‐ excellent materials for secondary metabolite utilization.  tral with regard to jurisdictional  claims in published maps and insti‐ Keywords: Lilium bulbs; postharvest; metabolites; principal component analysis  tutional affiliations.  1. Introduction  Copyright:  ©  2021  by  the  authors.  The genus Lilium has over 110 species in the world, of which 55 species are found in  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  China [1]. In  addition,  Lilium  is an important traditional Chinese medicine and edible  This article is an open  access article  food, and it is widely used as a horticultural ornamental plant. Three species of Lilium  distributed  under  the  terms  and  (Lilium  lancifolium  Thunb.,  Lilium  brownii  F.E.Brown  var.  viridulum  Baker.,  and  Lilium  conditions of the Creative Commons  pumilum DC.) have been recorded by Chinese Pharmacopoeia [2] and listed as a medicine  Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  food homology by China’s Ministry of Health [3]. Lilium brownii F.E.Brown var. viridulum  (http://creativecommons.org/licenses /by/4.0/).  Baker. bulbs (L.brownii), with a long medicinal history and active ingredients (such as  Agriculture 2021, 11, 184. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11020184  www.mdpi.com/journal/agriculture  Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  2  of  18  polyphenols,  saponins,  and  polysaccharides)  [4,5],  has  been  shown  to  have  an‐ ti‐inflammatory, anti‐tussive, hypoglycemic, antioxidant, immune‐modulatory, and an‐ ti‐tumor effects [6,7]. Apart from their bioactivities, L.brownii is mainly enjoyed by con‐ sumers for its edible properties. Polysaccharide, protein, amino acids, phospholipid, and  starch (primary metabolites) are probably the most important parameters [8].  Fresh L.brownii bulbs often display a series of quality issues, such as browning, nu‐ trient  loss,  or  secondary  metabolite  transformation  during  the  storage  period,  all  of  which impact the edibleness, medicinal value, and commercial value [9]. The browning  can  be  divided  into  enzymatic  browning  and  non‐enzymatic  browning.  Enzymatic  browning is caused by polyphenol oxidase (PPO) [10]. In the presence of oxygen, phe‐ nolic compounds are oxidized to quinones, and accumulation of quinones on the surface  of tissues causes a brown‐to‐black stripe to form after further non‐enzymatic oxidation  [11]. It is noteworthy that phenolic compounds from L.brownii bulbs are not only sub‐ strates  of  enzymatic  browning  but  secondary  metabolites  with  anti‐inflammatory  and  antioxidant activities. The aim of this study is to explore whether it accumulates under  stress physiology [12], as in stilbenes (as a plant antitoxin and bioactive component [13])  in grapes during storage, which can provide an important basis for its preparation and  utilization. It is of great significance to study the substrate for enzymatic browning and  pharmacological activities of L.brownii bulbs. In addition, due to the regional structure of  cells, enzymes and substrates are in different spaces, and the premise of their contact is  that the cell regionalization is broken. Therefore, malondialdehyde (MDA), as an indi‐ cator of membrane lipid peroxidation, is related to the degree of cell membrane damage  and is also an important indicator for the study of plant physiology and biochemistry  after harvest [14]. Non‐enzymatic browning is mainly caused by the Maillard reaction,  also known as the carbonyl ammonia reaction, which is widely used in the processing of  tea, cocoa, etc., but its detailed mechanism is still unclear [15]. At present, the Maillard  reaction  model  proposed  by  Hodge  is  more  recognized,  and  its  initial  stage  involves  dehydration  condensation  of  amino‐group‐containing  compounds  and  carbon‐ yl‐containing compounds [16]. The amino‐group‐containing compounds mainly refer to  free amino acids, while the carbonyl‐containing compounds mainly point to sugars, es‐ pecially reducing sugars [17]. While at present there is more extensive research on the  browning mechanism than in previous decades, the compounds that are involved in the  browning of fresh L.brownii bulbs are affected by a series of life activities and physico‐ chemical  factors  during  the  storage  period,  and  their  relationship  with  browning  still  needs further characterization.  In general, a plant’s exuberant metabolism makes it easy for a series of physiological  changes to occur in the course of storage, transportation, and sales [18]. Moreover, im‐ proper preservation can also cause deterioration of quality and greatly reduce the nutri‐ tional quality of L.brownii [19]. Despite the rapid development of the logistics industry,  fresh  L.brownii  bulbs  still  need  multiple  procedures,  from  excavation  to  the  finished  product. According to a field survey (Lanzhou, Gansu, China; Longhui and Longshan,  Hunan, China), it takes at least 3–7 days of logistics for it to leave the production area.  The whole process is relatively long, and the quality of L.brownii bulbs is often clearly  reduced. In the process of storage and transportation, L.brownii bulbs often face unsuita‐ ble storage temperatures, and this accelerates the deterioration rate of fresh bulbs [20]. In  the process of offline sales, in order to provide L.brownii bulbs with an excellent outward  appearance,  fluorescent  lamps  are  usually  applied.  However,  this  results  in  apparent  factor changes, of which, the main manifestation is redness [21,22]. At present, even with  mature  preservation  techniques,  addressing  fresh  L.brownii  quality  problems  during  storage and transportation remains a challenge; therefore, it is necessary to analyze the  details of chemical composition variation during fresh L.brownii storage.  In this study, the aims are to (i) study the primary and secondary metabolite content  variation in fresh L.brownii bulbs during storage from the perspective of the browning  mechanism,  thereby  providing  assistance  to  the  study  of  preservation  technology  re‐   Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  3  of  18  garding plant‐derived food; (ii) explore the pathway to improve the yield of secondary  metabolites in L.brownii bulbs.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Chemicals and Instruments  The  formic  acid,  acetonitrile,  and  methanol  used  for  high‐performance  liquid  chromatography  (HPLC)  analysis  were  chromatographic  grade  and  purchased  from  Merck  KGaA  (Shanghai,  China).  The  ethanol,  anthrone,  sulphuric  acid,  glucose,  DNS  (3,5‐dinitrosalicylic  acid),  phenol,  hydrochloric  acid,  sodium  carbonate,  sodium  dihy‐ drogen  phosphate,  disodium  hydrogen  phosphate,  catechol,  guaiacol,  and  hydrogen  peroxide solution were all analytical purity (AR) and obtained from Sinopharm Chemical  Reagent Co., Ltd. (Shanghai, China). The bovine serum albumin (BSA), Coomassie Bright  Blue G‐250, Foline‐phenol, and gallic acid were purchased from Yuan‐ye Bio‐Technology  Co., Ltd. (Shanghai, China).  The  ultraviolet  spectrophotometer  (UV‐1800)  was  purchased  from  Shimadzu  Co.,  Ltd. (Kyoto, Japan). The analytical balance (XS 250) was obtained from METTLER TO‐ LEDO  (Columbus,  OH,  USA).  The  high‐speed  centrifuge  (2‐16R)  was  purchased  from  HENGNUO Instrument Equipment Co., Ltd. (Changsha, Hunan, China).  2.2. Plant Material  Fresh bulbs of L.brownii brownii F.E.Brown var. viridulum Baker. were provided by  Hunan  Lvyuan Agricultural Development co., Ltd. (Shaoyang, Hunan, China) in July,  2019, and identified by Jianguo Zeng, from Hunan Agricultural University. The experi‐ ment was conducted in National Center (Hunan) for Traditional Chinese Medicine Pro‐ duction Technology (E:113.0853°; N:28.1836°), Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha,  China. The bulbs were peeled and washed with cold water, dried surface moisture by  hair drier with cold air blast model, and then stored under 4 conditions: Group 1 (G1)  was placed in a −20 °C refrigerator. Group 2 (G2) was placed in a 4 °C refrigerator. Group  3 (G3) was placed in a dark room (temperature = 25 ± 2 °C). Group 4 (G4) was placed  under the light (d = 60 cm, temperature = 25 ± 2 °C).   The samples were taken randomly once every 6 days during storage process.  2.3. Measurement of Browning Degree  The  browning  degree  was  determined  as  described  by  Jeong‐Seok  Cho  and  Kwang‐Deog Moon [23] with a slight modification. In short, three samples (5.0 ± 0.01 g)  were  randomly sampled, 10  mL 0.2% VC solution was added and homogenized in ice  bath, an additional 15 mL was used to wash the residue to a 50‐mL centrifuge tube. The  homogenate was centrifuged at 8000 rpm for 20 min at 4 °C. After it, the supernatant was  centrifuged again under the same conditions. The absorbance of the resulting solution  was measured at 420 nm, and the 0.2% VC solution used as blank group.  2.4. Measurement of Total Carbohydrates  The extracted and determined methods of total carbohydrates were referred to by Ji  Zhang, et al. [24] with a slight modification. In short, three samples (5.0 ±  0.01 g) were  randomly sampled, 150 mL distilled water was added and homogenized, extracted by  heating in water bath at 65 °C for 6h. Then, the extraction solution was centrifuged at  8000 rpm for 30 min at 4 °C after it cooled to room temperature, 1.0 mL supernatant was  diluted 50 times and taken as the sample to be tested.   The content was quantified using the anthracenone‐sulfuric method at 625 nm and  determined  comparing  the  absorbance  of  sample  with  respect  to  a  standard  curve  of  glucose.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  4  of  18  2.5. Measurement of Total Reducing Sugars  The extracted and determined methods of reducing sugars were referred to by Jun  Chen, et al. [25] with a slight modification. In short, three samples (5.0 ±  0.01 g) were  randomly  sampled,  100  mL  water‐ethanol  (v/v  =  20/80)  was  added  and  homogenized,  using reflux extraction at 85 °C for 1 h. Then, the extraction solution was centrifuged at  8000 rpm for 30 min at 4 °C after it cooled to room temperature, 1.0 mL supernatant was  taken as the sample to be tested.   The content was quantified using the 3,5‐dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method at 540  nm: 1.0 mL sample was mixed with 1.5 mL DNS reagent (2.5 g 3,5‐dinitrosalicylic acid,  0.5 g phenol, 0.075 g sodium nitrite, 2.5 g NaOH, and 50 g KNaC4H4O6∙4H2O were dis‐ solved into a spot of distilled water one by one and then to a constant volume to 50 mL),  and determined by comparing the absorbance of sample with respect to a standard curve  of glucose.  2.6. Measurement the Content of Water‐Soluble Protein  The extracted and determined methods of water‐soluble protein were referred to by  Xiaoqiang Chen, et al. [26] with a slight modification and simplification: three samples  (5.0 ± 0.01 g) were randomly sampled, 100 mL distilled water was added and homoge‐ nized, extracted by heating in water bath at 65 °C for 4 h. Then, the extraction solution  was centrifuged at 8000 rpm for 30 min at 4 °C after it cooled to room temperature, 1.0  mL supernatant was diluted 5 times and taken as the sample to be tested.   The content of water‐soluble protein was quantified using the Coomassie Brilliant  Blue method at 595 nm and determined by comparing the absorbance of sample with  respect to a standard curve of bovine serum albumin (BSA).  2.7. Measurement of Free Amino Acids Content  The extracted and content determined methods of free amino acids were referred to  GB/T 8314‐2013 (Tea‐determination of free amino acids content) [27] with a slight modi‐ fication and simplification: three samples (2.0 ± 0.01 g) were randomly sampled, 100 mL  distilled water was added and homogenized, extracted by heating in water bath at 100 °C  for 1 h. Then, the extraction solution was centrifuged at 12,000 rpm for 30 min at 4 °C af‐ ter  it  cooled  to  room  temperature, 0.5  mL  supernatant  was  taken  as  the  sample  to  be  tested.  The  preparation  of  ninhydrin  solution:  2.0  g  ninhydrin  monohydrate  and  80  mg  stannous chloride were added into 50 mL distilled water, reaction in dark for 24 h after  ultrasonic assisted  dissolution. The supernatant was diluted  to 100  mL after filtration.  Determination method: 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 mg/mL arginine standard solution were  prepared with distilled water, and transfered 0.5 mL into the test tube respectively. Then  0.2 mL phosphate buffer solution (pH = 8.0) and 0.2 mL ninhydrin solution were added.  Finally, it was soaked in boiling water for 15 min, and diluted to 10 mL with distilled  water  after  it  cooled  to  room  temperature  with  ice  water.  The  free  acids  content  was  quantified at 570 nm and determined comparing the absorbance of sample with respect a  standard curve of arginine.  2.8. Measurement of Total Phenolics Content  The extracted and determined methods of total phenolics were referred to by Lei Jin,  et al. [28] with a slight modification: three samples (5.0 ± 0.01 g) were randomly sampled,  100 mL water‐ethanol (v/v = 20/80) was added and homogenized, using ultrasound ex‐ traction at 40 °C for 30 min. Then, the extraction solution was centrifuged at 8000 rpm for  30 min at 4 °C after it cooled to room temperature, 1.0 mL supernatant was taken as the  sample to be tested.     Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  5  of  18  The content of total phenolics was quantified by the Folin‐Ciocalteu method at 765  nm: 1.0 mL sample was mixed with 0.5 mL Folin solution and 1.0 mL 15% Na2CO3 was  added after 5 min, and then constant volume with distilled water to 10 mL. Then, de‐ termined comparing the absorbance of sample with respect to a standard curve of gallic  acid.  2.9. Measurement of Polyphenol Oxidase Activity  The extraction and measurement of PPO were carried out using a modification of  the method of M. Siddiq and K.D. Dolan [29]. Briefly, 2.0 g L.brownii bulbs were blended  in 10 mL of pH 6.0 phosphate buffer and homogenized in an ice bath. Then, centrifuged  at 8000 rpm, 4 °C for 20 min in a refrigerated centrifuge.  The PPO activity measurement: the reaction mixture consisted of 1.0 mL of 0.1 M  catechol in 3.9 mL phosphate buffer (pH = 6.0) and 0.2 mL of PPO extract, determination  after heat preservation at 25 °C for 5 min. The change in absorbance at 420 nm was ob‐ served for 3 min at 25 °C, using an ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The reaction velocity  (V) was calculated from the linear part of the plot of absorbance (A) against time (t). The  unit  of  PPO  activity  was  defined  as  the  change  in  the  absorbance  of  0.001/min  (△A  420nm/min) due to the oxidation of substrate.  2.10. Measurement of MDA Content  The extraction and measurement of MDA were carried out using a modification of  the method of Janero, D. R. [30]. The preparation of test solution: 100 (±5) mg samples  were put into a 2 mL centrifuge tube, 1.0 mL 10% TCA was added, and homogenized  with tissue grinder. The homogenate was centrifuged at 4 °C and 12,000 rpm for 20 min,  and the supernatant was the test solution.  The determination method: 200 μL 10% TCA, test solution and TBA working solu‐ tion (0.68% TBA solution, prepared with 10% TCA) were added into a 2 mL centrifuge  tube. After 15 min of boiling water bath, it was cooled and centrifuged at 4 °C and 12,000  rpm for 10 min. The absorbance values were measured at λ = 450, 532, and 600 nm. The  results were calculated by empirical formula: MDA content (μM) = 6.45 × (A532 nm − A600 nm)  −  0.56  ×  A450  nm;  MDA  content  (μmol/mg)  =  MDA  content  (μM)  ×  extraction  volume  (mL)/fresh weight of tissue (g).  2.11. High‐Performance Liquid Chromatography Quadrupole Time‐of‐Flight Mass Spectrometry  (HPLC‐Q‐TOF‐MS) Conditions  The  HPLC  and  Q‐TOF‐MS  conditions  for  analyzing  phenolic  compounds  were  measured through that reported earlier by Zhao, K.H. et al. [31].   An  Agilent  1260  HPLC  system  (Agilent  Technologies,  Palo  Alto,  CA,  USA),  equipped with a quat pump, an automatic sampler with a 20‐μL sample loop, a thermo‐ stat  of  column,  a  diode  array  detector  (DAD),  and  an  Agilent  ChemStation  (Agilent  Technologies, Palo Alto, CA, USA) had been employed to analyze samples. The mobile  phase was a binary gradient prepared from acetonitrile(B) and a solution of acetic acid  0.1% (v/v) (A). It used the gradient elution procedure: B phase 0–5 min is 10%–12%, 5–20  min is 12%–15%, 20–25 min is 15%–19%, 25–40 min is 19%–30%, 40–50 min is 30%–40%,  50–55  min  is  40%–35%,  55–56  min  is  35%–10%,  56–65min  is  10%–10%.  An  Ag‐ ilent‐ZORBAX SB‐C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm, Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto,  CA, USA) was performed for the chromatographic separation of total polyphenol extract.  Identification of mass spectrum was employed on an accurate mass spectrometer of  Agilent 6530 Q‐TOF‐MS (Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA, USA). Chromatographic  separation was employed on an Agilent‐ZORBAX SB‐C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5  μm,  Agilent Technologies,  Palo  Alto,  CA, USA), and  the  effluent  of the  HPLC  mobile  phase was split and guided into the electrospray ionization (ESI) source. Parameter con‐ ditions were performed as following: negative mode, capillary voltage, 3500 V; nebulizer    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  6  of  18  pressure, 50 psi; nozzle voltage, 1000 V; flow rate of drying gas, 6 L/min; temperature of  sheath gas, 350 °C; flow rate of sheath gas, 11 L/min; skimmer voltage, 65 V; OCT1 RF  Vpp, 750 V; fragmentor voltage, 135 V. The spectra data were recorded in the range of  m/z 100–1000 Da in a centroid pattern of full‐scan MS analysis mode. The MS/MS data of  the selected compounds were obtained by regulating diverse collision energy (10–30 eV).  2.12. Statistical Analysis  Data were presented as the mean ± standard deviation from at least three different  experiments. All data of all groups were analyzed by one‐way ANOVA using SPSS (ver‐ sion 23.0). All contents were expressed as dry matter. Line graphs were drawn by Origin  (version 2018). Principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted with SIMCA 14.1.  The  Materials  and  Methods  should  be  described  with  sufficient  details  to  allow  others to replicate and build on the published results. Please note that the publication of  your manuscript implicates that you must make all materials, data, computer code, and  protocols  associated  with  the  publication  available  to  readers.  Please  disclose  at  the  submission  stage  any  restrictions  on  the  availability  of  materials  or  information.  New  methods and protocols should be described in detail while well‐established methods can  be briefly described and appropriately cited.  Research  manuscripts  reporting  large  datasets  that  are  deposited  in  a  publicly  available database should specify where the data have been deposited and provide the  relevant accession numbers. If the accession numbers have not yet been obtained at the  time of submission, please state that they will be provided during review. They must be  provided prior to publication.  Interventionary studies involving animals or humans, and other studies that require  ethical approval, must list the authority that provided approval and the corresponding  ethical approval code.  3. Results and Discussion  3.1. Variation in Browning and Contents of Primary Metabolites during Storage Periods  As shown in Figure 1, the browning of fresh L.brownii bulbs was not obvious under  the low temperature, while it increased with the increase in storage time and tempera‐ ture. In addition, the process was accelerated by light [32].  Figure 1. Variation curve of browning degree under four storage conditions.  Protein,  amino  acids,  and  sugars  are  the  major  primary  metabolites  in  L.brownii  bulbs [33]. As shown in Figure 2A, the total polysaccharide content showed a downward    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  7  of  18  trend  during  the  30‐day  storage  process.  This  indicates  that  carbohydrate  metabolism  still exists in plants under different storage conditions [34]. G1 and G2 maintained the  same changing trend, which was higher than that of other groups, and they showed that  refrigeration and cryopreservation weaken the life metabolism of L.brownii bulbs. When  considering  the  effects  of  light,  we  observed  that  the  contents  of  G3  were  lower  than  those of G4, suggesting that the sugar metabolism of bulbs was more vigorous under the  condition of avoiding light.   Figure 2. Variation curves of four primary metabolites under four storage conditions.  As shown in Figure 2B, the reducing sugar contents of G1, G2, and G3 increased  with temperature and clearly increased under light (G4) until the 6th day. In the early  stage of storage, the plant maintained relatively vigorous vitality and a faster metabolic  rate, which increased the content of reducing sugars. During the period from day 6 to 12,  the content of each group decreased. This may be because reducing sugars usually pro‐ vide energy for plant life activities, and plant tissues were still active before the 12th day  [35].  After  the  12th  day,  the  consumption  rate  of  reducing  sugars  was  lower  than  the  production rate (reducing sugars are the degradation products of polysaccharides [36]),  with the vitality of the bulbs gradually decreasing (thereby causing a decline in energy  demand [37]) [38]. Thus, the content of reducing sugars increased slightly.  Proteins and amino acids are involved in a variety of  plant life activities [39]. As  shown  in  Figure  2C,  the  water‐soluble  protein  contents  of  G1  and  G2  maintained  the  same level during the same period. This may be due to the low life activity of plant tissue  and the stable protein structure at a  low temperature [40]. Moreover, the  two groups’  contents were higher than those of G3 and G4. The reason for this may be the decrease in  water‐soluble  protein  content  for  the  strengthened  life  metabolism  without  a  source  supply of N with the increase in storage temperature [41]. In addition, the water‐soluble  protein content of G4 decreased sharply and was significantly lower than that of other  groups in the later stage. This may be due to the fact that the plant tissues were stimu‐ lated by light and accelerated the life metabolism rate [42].    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  8  of  18  Amino acids are the basic unit of protein [43]. The results showed that the change  trend of free amino acid content in fresh L.brownii was similar to that of the protein under  different storage conditions (Figure 2D). The difference is that the life activity of G1 was  inhibited by the low temperature below 0 °C, which caused the content change to not be  significant. The bulb tissue of G2 was stored at a low temperature and maintained weak  life activity, meaning that amino acids showed a slow downward trend. The contents of  G3 and G4 significantly decreased because the temperature was suitable for their life ac‐ tivities. However, the changes in free amino acid content only showed a relationship with  storage temperature and did not show the effect of light.  According to Hodge’s Maillard reaction model, the substrates in the initial stage of  the model are compounds containing amino and carbonyl groups [44]. The results above  show  that,  in  the  storage  process,  the  contents  of  the  total  polysaccharides,  wa‐ ter‐solubility  proteins,  and  free  amino  acids  displayed  a  negative  correlation  with  the  change trend of the browning degree. Assuming that the Maillard reaction occurred, the  content  of  carbonyl  compounds  should  maintain  a  high  negative  correlation  with  the  browning degree [45]. G1 displayed unclear browning in the storage process (Figure 1).  However, the content of total polysaccharides in this group still decreased, and the amino  compounds  did  not  show  a  similar  trend.  The  content  variations  of  the  two  reaction  substrates lacked consistency. This indicates that the changes in contents of the four nu‐ trients were not the material basis for L.brownii browning. Thus, it was not possible to  consider the notion that carbonyl and amino compounds participate in the reaction. The  occurrence of the Maillard reaction could not be judged. Therefore, it can be suggested  that the changes in contents of carbonyl compounds and amino compounds were caused  by the physiological mechanism of adversity during the storage period [46,47].  3.2. Variation in PPO Activity and Contents of MDA and Total Polyphenols during Storage  Periods   MDA levels indirectly reflect the degree of cell damage [48]. The increase in MDA  levels  suggested that the cell  was damaged,  which provided  conditions for  oxygen to  enter cells, and the accumulation of phenolic compounds provided sufficient substrate  for  PPO  [49].  Phenolic  compounds  are  secondary  metabolites  of  plants;  they  not  only  have pharmacological activities but are plant antitoxins [50]. As shown in Figure 3, the  total polyphenol content was the lowest in G1, because the synthesis of phenolic com‐ pounds is inhibited by low temperature [51]. However, its content decreased slightly due  to the influence of polyphenol oxidase, and MDA content increased as a result of freezing  injury [52].    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  9  of  18  Figure 3. Variation curves of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, total polyphenols, and  malondialdehyde (MDA) contents under four storage conditions.  As the temperature increased up to 4 °C, MDA content appeared lower than that of  the other groups. Therefore, there was no obvious accumulation of phenolic compounds.  Phenolic compounds would have been slightly consumed for the remaining weak activ‐ ity  of  PPO,  leading  to  weak  browning.  However,  the  bulbs  of  G3  were  in  an  active  physiological state, and the adverse factors, such as nutrient deficiency and water loss,  still caused tissue damage [53]. This led to the increased MDA content and accumulation  of phenolic compounds, which provided sufficient substrate for enzymatic reaction in the  early stage of storage (until the 6th day). At the same time, this temperature was within  the best activity temperature range of PPO, and therefore, PPO activity increased [54].  These factors caused the browning degree of G3 to be higher than that of G1 and G2.  However, the metabolic capacity of tissue decreases as nutrients are consumed during  storage  periods  [55].  This  caused  the  contents  of  phenolic  compounds  to  begin  to  de‐ crease  after  the  6th  day.  PPO  activity  gradually  became  inactivate,  meaning  that  the  contents of phenolic compounds maintained a stable level in the later stage of storage (on  the 24th day). Plant respiration was aggravated by light (G4), and the tissues showed    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  10  of  18  severe physiological phenomenon and damage (MDA content increased rapidly), leading  to  the  aggravated  browning.  G4  and  G3  showed  similar  metabolic  processes  during  storage, and, different to G3, PPO was passivated by long‐time light. Consequently, the  PPO activity of G4 decreased rapidly after the 6th day.   The  results  show  that  the  total  polyphenol  content  was  closely  related  to  storage  conditions.  The  low temperature  inhibited  the increase in total  polyphenol  content  by  inhibiting plant vitality [56]. Moreover, light enhanced the stress resistance physiology of  plants, which aggravated the accumulation of total polyphenols in the short storage pe‐ riod.  In summary, during the storage of fresh L.brownii bulbs, the stress of adversity in‐ duced tissue damage, which led to the phenolic compounds being oxidized by PPO and  the occurrence of the enzymatic reaction. With the weakening of life activities and the  consumption  of  the  enzymatic  reaction,  the  content  of  phenolic  compounds  gradually  decreased. The PPO was passivated by temperature and light with the increase in storage  time,  which  caused  the  intensity  of  the  enzymatic  reaction  to  decrease.  Finally,  the  browning degree reached a high level, and the content of phenolic compounds reached  the equilibrium state. Therefore, the physical and chemical parameter variation of fresh  L.brownii bulbs during the storage period could be explained more reasonably from the  perspective of the enzymatic browning mechanism.  3.3. Identification of Phenolic Compounds Via High‐Performance Liquid Chromatography  Quadrupole Time‐of‐Flight Mass Spectrometry (HPLC‐Q‐TOF‐MS)  The phenolic compounds are secondary metabolites of plants, which have a wide  range of biological activities, such as anti‐inflammatory, antioxidant, anti‐aging, and an‐ tidepressant properties [57,58]. According to the report of Luo et al. [59], the phenolic  compounds in  L.brownii are mainly  phenylpropanoids,  which have significant antioxi‐ dant activity. In our previous study [30], the 12 phenolic acids from L.brownii bulbs were  identified  via  liquid  chromatography  quadrupole  time‐of‐flight  mass  spectrometry  (LC‐Q‐TOF‐MS) and analysis in negative ion mode. The 12 compounds are as follows:  1‐O‐caffeoyl‐3‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol  (compound‐1);  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐3‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol  (compound‐2);  1‐O‐caffeoyl‐3‐O‐p‐coumaroylglycerol(compound‐3);  1‐O‐caffeoyl‐2‐O‐p‐coumaroylglycerol(compound‐4);  1‐O‐feruloyl‐2‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol(compound‐5);  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐2‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosyl‐3‐O‐acetylglycerol  (compound‐6);  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐2‐O‐hydroxymethy‐3‐O‐acetylglycerol  (compound‐7);  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐2‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosyl‐3‐O‐acetylglycerol  (compound‐8);  1‐O‐feruloyl‐3‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol(compound‐9);  1,3‐O‐di‐p‐coumaroylglycerol(compound‐10);  1‐O‐feruloyl‐3‐O‐p‐coumaroylglycerol(compound‐11);  1,2‐O‐diferuloylglycerol(compound‐12).   They are mainly composed of coumarin acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid, which are  connected by one molecule of glycerol, and the glycerol group are formed by para/ortho  substitution  or  glucose  substitution/acetylation.  Hence,  these  compounds  belong  to  phenolic  glycerides/glycosides  (phenylpropanoid  compounds),  and  are  called  “regalo‐ sides” in some studies [7].  However,  the  contents  of  other  phenylpropanoids,  except  for  1‐O‐caffeoyl‐3‐O‐p‐coumaroylglycerol,  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐2‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosyl‐3‐O‐acetylglycerol,  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐2‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol,  and  1‐O‐feruloyl‐3‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol, are very low in the fresh L.brownii bulbs,  which caused the cost of isolation and purification to be very high. This restricts the de‐ velopment  and  utilization  of  regalosides  and  indicates  that  the  phenylpropanoids  in  L.brownii still have great research space.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  11  of  18  3.4. Analysis of the Relative Contents of the 12 Compounds via HPLC.  The data above show that the content of phenolic compounds is usually low in fresh  L.brownii bulbs, which leads to the high cost of separation and purification. This is a bar‐ rier for the development and utilization of secondary metabolites from L.brownii bulbs.  As shown in Figures 3A and 4, the content of total polyphenols has an obvious accumu‐ lation phenomenon during storage, and the main phenolic compounds in L.brownii bulbs  are the 12 phenylpropanoids. Therefore, to characterize the content variation of the 12  compounds in this section, HPLC was used. The results (Tables 1 and 2) showed that the  relative contents of the compounds did not change significantly when stored at 4 °C and  −20 °C. This illustrated the notion that the L.brownii bulbs’ life activities were weak and  that bulbs were in a state of approximate dormancy. However, the relative contents of all  compounds increased significantly under a temperature of 25 °C in light conditions for 30  days (Tables 3 and 4). This suggested that the L.brownii bulbs’ life activities did not stop  immediately  after  harvest  and  that  the  phenolic  acid  compounds  accumulated  under  stress. In addition, Yin, L. B. et al. also reported that the contents of saponins, flavonoids,  and polyphenols were relatively stable in the early stage (1–5 weeks) via controlled at‐ mosphere storage, indicating that storage conditions had a significant effect on the con‐ tent of secondary metabolites of L.brownii bulbs [60].  Figure 4. The high‐performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) chromatogram of fresh L.brownii.  Table 1. The relative contents of the 12 compounds stored at −20 °C for 30 days.  Storage Time (d  0  6  12  18  24  30  Compound‐1  107.06 ± 1.12  104.74 ± 4.01  134.35 ± 3.37 a  143.99 ± 3.24  173.91 ± 0.91a  232.56 ± 14.82 a  Compound‐2  269.81 ± 0.77  366.66 ± 21.92 a  468.30 ± 12.85 a  370.04 ± 25.44 a  350.94 ± 18.63  350.21 ± 9.19  Compound‐3  3792.36 ± 10.64  3328.57 ± 41.58  4510.88 ± 37.21 b  3879.37 ± 29.17 a  3959.79 ± 31.76  3818.84 ± 44.48  Compound‐4  82.43 ± 1.90  50.01 ± 2.33 a  44.24 ± 5.14  48.79 ± 2.23  49.45 ± 2.00  51.25 ± 2.33  Compound‐5  138.55 ± 8.09  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  Compound‐6  38.17 ± 6.24  58.65 ± 6.74  123.35 ± 8.91 a  225.67 ± 13.11 a  224.93 ± 6.27  153.44 ± 0.67 a  Compound‐7  65.15 ± 1.94  663.53 ± 11.77 b  110.70 ± 0.19  179.63 ± 10.95  124.48 ± 7.34  104.61 ± 27.98  Compound‐8  1902.94 ± 20.62  1920.21 ± 34.19  2844.26 ± 27.14 a  2431.70 ± 21.32  1731.18 ± 19.50 a  1741.15 ± 25.31  Compound‐9  57.18 ± 3.13  0.00  0.00  0.00  49.11 ± 2.13 b  0.00  Compound‐10  57.13 ± 2.75  0.00  0.00  0.00  51.14 ± 4.41 b  0.00  Compound‐11  318.89 ± 10.10  165.03 ± 7.99 b  144.05 ± 11.36  124.77 ± 18.62  246.62 ± 9.93 a  59.35 ± 4.04 b  Compound‐12  245.41 ± 4.59  108.06 ± 9.68b  102.88 ± 4.40  108.51 ± 3.90  200.88 ± 6.75 a  68.01 ± 4.62 b  Note: a—compared with the former group, p < 0.05; b—compared with the former group, p < 0.01.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  12  of  18  Table 2. The relative contents of the 12 compounds stored at 4 °C for 30 days.  Stor age Time (d  0  6  12  18  24  30  Compound‐1  107.06 ± 1.12  123.90 ± 6.10  243.12 ± 7.70 a  338.23 ± 9.65 a  332.02 ± 5.49  462.35 ± 2.02 a  Compound‐2  269.81 ± 0.77  433.41 ± 16.06 b  464.93 ± 23.19  489.99 ± 8.06  331.14 ± 28.23 b  300.34 ± 11.62 a  Compound‐3  3792.36 ± 10.64  4467.63 ± 79.88 a  8097.52 ± 46.85 b  6808.66 ± 35.17 b  4548.36 ± 69.95 b  4867.97 ± 63.97  Compound‐4  82.43 ± 1.90  126.53 ± 9.02 a  71.00 ± 7.95 a  78.89 ± 2.82  60.55 ± 4.70 a  53.73 ± 3.47 a  Compound‐5  138.55 ± 8.09  593.93 ± 65.00 b  350.00 ± 44.35 b  310.76 ± 7.62  182.95 ± 3.43 b  137.18 ± 6.71 a  Compound‐6  38.17 ± 6.24  50.49 ± 2.46  106.06 ± 8.87 a  344.63 ± 9.50 b  126.13 ± 6.70 b  88.22 ± 2.24 a  Compound‐7  65.15 ± 1.94  1065.39 ± 22.50 b  1175.18 ± 86.93  979.67 ± 18.98  979.87 ± 55.00  676.12 ± 52.29 b  Compound‐8  1902.94 ± 20.62  2011.81 ± 39.71  3834.91 ± 57.62 b  3175.96 ± 78.49 a  3276.26 ± 15.89  1822.14 ± 78.29 b  Compound‐9  57.18 ± 3.13  51.12 ± 3.40  40.71 ± 3.45  142.48 ± 8.46 b  77.15 ± 7.65 b  37.51 ± 7.52 b  Compound‐10  57.13 ± 2.75  99.40 ± 6.42  148.64 ± 8.96 a  137.33 ± 9.57  206.54 ± 4.25 b  219.61 ± 13.09  Compound‐11  318.89 ± 10.10  312.24 ± 9.63  436.58 ± 32.42 b  466.44 ± 41.59  695.25 ± 5.25 b  588.63 ± 55.47 a  Compound‐12  245.41 ± 4.59  295.42 ± 9.24  295.20 ± 11.78  320.14 ± 6.19 a  322.86 ± 4.01  656.28 ± 20.75 b  Note: a—compared with the former group, p < 0.05; b—compared with the former group, p < 0.01.  Table 3. The relative contents of the 12 compounds stored at 25 °C for 30 days.  Storage Time (d   0  6  12  18  24  30  Compound‐1  107.06 ± 1.12  806.38 ± 83.77 b   418.99 ± 50.57 b   390.23 ± 44.67  354.21 ± 70.30  312.80 ± 26.72 a   Compound‐2  269.81 ± 0.77  507.73 ± 63.91 b   280.24 ± 23.62 b   221.42 ± 17.38 a   208.48 ± 10.41  203.13 ± 9.90  Compound‐3  3792.36 ± 10.64  10447.69 ± 90.12 b   7129.24 ± 54.92 b   6726.39 ± 62.35 a   6118.67 ± 39.33  5647.84 ± 7.67 a   Compound‐4  82.43 ± 1.90  86.91 ± 5.02  88.66 ± 2.03  95.75 ± 3.13  115.36 ± 9.63 a   92.61 ± 3.20a   Compound‐5  138.55 ± 8.09  501.10 ± 25.35 b   327.10 ± 7.31 a   323.20 ± 7.74  332.48 ± 8.64  385.84 ± 13.15  Compound‐6  38.17 ± 6.24  231.16 ± 10.56 b   210.94 ± 14.86  200.58 ± 9.78  164.02 ± 7.95 a   116.74 ± 7.85 a   Compound‐7  65.15 ± 1.94  1079.15 ± 62.58 b   1166.15 ± 48.29  1170.79 ± 22.29  2527.22 ± 14.50 b   3082.76 ± 36.60 b   Compound‐8  1902.94 ± 20.62  3532.78 ± 15.72 b   2792.35 ± 24.80 a   2293.82 ± 63.50 a   1922.79 ± 41.07 a   1772.28 ± 10.83  Compound‐9  57.18 ± 3.13  231.57 ± 14.57 b   235.06 ± 5.83  246.37 ± 14.22  211.59 ± 8.64  405.21 ± 10.64 b   Compound‐10  57.13 ± 2.75  188.33 ± 9.84 b   221.71 ± 18.02 a   245.49 ± 16.89  294.58 ± 7.97  442.28 ± 14.73 b   Compound‐11  318.89 ± 10.10  1298.38 ± 77.36 b   1372.30 ± 85.52  1462.44 ± 28.18  1630.94 ± 34.05 a   2534.24 ± 23.97 b   Compound‐12  245.41 ± 4.59  731.93 ± 33.76 b   879.45 ± 13.08 a   878.87 ± 23.88  1167.70 ± 34.13 a   2034.22 ± 9.88 b   Note: a—compared with the former group, p < 0.05; b—compared with the former group, p < 0.01.  Table 4. The relative contents of the 12 compounds stored under light (25 °C) for 30 days.  Storage Time (d)  0  6  12  18  24  30  Compound‐1  107.06 ± 1.12  1508.49 ± 5.82 b  1220.13 ± 18.94 a  1240.64 ± 3.16  1352.80 ± 7.60  856.40 ± 12.81 b  Compound‐2  269.81 ± 0.77  557.64 ± 8.25 b  398.62 ± 4.02 a  365.16 ± 3.84  318.01 ± 8.09  131.95 ± 3.58 b  Compound‐3  3792.36 ± 10.64  19552.51 ± 66.80 b  14076.69 ± 58.97 a  12216.46 ± 21.20  15310.31 ± 28.22  6343.77 ± 22.20 b  Compound‐4  82.43 ± 1.90  168.95 ± 25.18 a  172.03 ± 6.17  184.10 ± 8.10  738.79 ± 13.22 b  160.86 ± 4.11  Compound‐5  138.55 ± 8.09  761.45 ± 17.77 b  565.31 ± 14.00 a  528.32 ± 11.05  476.00 ± 9.13  396.46 ± 4.66 a  Compound‐6  38.17 ± 6.24  232.56 ± 13.55 b  319.51 ± 9.52 a  427.66 ± 5.58 a  345.16 ± 7.80  258.99 ± 6.78 a  Compound‐7  65.15 ± 1.94  96.74 ± 4.62 a  106.42 ± 2.64  118.95 ± 5.44  146.34 ± 5.92 a  97.07 ± 2.11 a  Compound‐8  1902.94 ± 20.62  5711.26 ± 24.24 b  5912.23 ± 30.81  7707.86 ± 63.75 b  5743.15 ± 16.20 b  1777.04 ± 11.74 b  Compound‐9  57.18 ± 3.13  305.86 ± 28.12 b  347.67 ± 14.84 a  337.14 ± 8.86  369.30 ± 11.72  604.24 ± 21.24 b  Compound‐10  57.13 ± 2.75  251.67 ± 2.22 b  330.60 ± 18.74 a  368.88 ± 20.24  399.97 ± 15.89  441.66 ± 6.57 a  Compound‐11  318.89 ± 10.10  1918.76 ± 6.46 b  2182.49 ± 46.31  2000.44 ± 18.32  2225.78 ± 35.09  3083.81 ± 28.07 b  Compound‐12  245.41 ± 4.59  1173.02 ± 28.34 b  1429.78 ± 37.72 a  1448.31 ± 28.67  1528.76 ± 9.81  2548.10 ± 16.24 b  Note: a—compared with the former group, p < 0.05; b—compared with the former group, p < 0.01.  When stored at 25 °C (as shown in Table 3), the relative contents of compounds 1, 2,  3, 5, 6, 8, and 11 reached the maximum value at the early stage of storage (until the 6th  day),  and  compound  4  reached  the  maximum  value  on  the  24th  day.  However,  their  contents all  decreased  after  reaching  the  maximum  value.  This  may  be  caused  by  the  weakening of life metabolism. When the life metabolism became weak, phenolic com‐ pounds accumulated to a lesser extent and were consumed by oxidase, resulting in con‐ sumption being greater than generation. The contents of compounds 7, 9, 10, and 12 were    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  13  of  18  very low in the early stage of storage; the contents were not stable until the later stage of  storage (after the 27th day); and their cumulative amounts reached the maximum. Thus,  it appears that they were in a continuous accumulation state during the storage process  [61].  Under a temperature of 4 °C (as shown in Table 2), the life metabolism of L.brownii  bulbs were weakened, and the water loss was not obvious (stored in refrigerator). This  indicates that L.brownii bulbs were in a dormant state; thus, the accumulation of phenolic  compounds  was  not  significant.  When  stored  at −20  °C  (as  shown  in  Table  1),  the  12  compounds almost did not show phenomenon of accumulation. This indicates that the  life activities of L.brownii were basically stopped at −20 °C. When the life metabolism of  fresh L.brownii bulbs was inhibited by a low temperature, the contents of the 12 phenolic  acids also changed slightly. Notably, with the increase in storage time, the metabolism  ability of fresh L.brownii bulbs was gradually lost under a temperature of −20 °C, result‐ ing in the decrease in each of these compounds.  As shown in Table 4, the relative contents of compounds 1, 2, 3, and 5 reached the  maximum value on the 6th day. Unlike G3, there was a shift in the time when the relative  contents of compounds 6, 8, and 11 reached their maximum values. The maximum rela‐ tive content of each compound in G4 was significantly higher than that in the other three  groups. The results show that the contents of phenolic acids in L.brownii bulbs increased  rapidly when exposed to sunlight, which is similar to the results of French scholars on  grapevine cutting [62]. The higher the degree of plant damage, the more obvious the ac‐ cumulation of plant antitoxins. However, the stronger stress conditions aggravated the  respiration of plants, making the plant tissue lose water and die quickly. After the 6th  day, the L.brownii bulb tissues were seriously damaged due to the light. Eventually, they  lost  their  vitality,  which  resulted  in  the  interruption  of  their  synthesis.  Moreover,  the  consumption of other pathways and the degradation of the compounds still existed un‐ der strong light conditions, which finally contributed to the decrease in compound con‐ tent.  In conclusion, the contents of phenolic acid compounds in fresh L.brownii bulbs were  very  low.  In  addition,  the  content  of  phenolic  compounds  was  accumulated  in  bulbs  under adverse conditions. In fact, L.brownii bulbs being damaged by sale delay or other  factors is inevitable. L.brownii without commercial value could be used for the extraction  and separation of phenolic acids to avoid the waste of resources. Furthermore, the ac‐ cumulation of compounds through stress physiology is an effective way to improve the  utilization rate of L.brownii resources and the development of phenolic acids.  3.5. Principal Component Analysis of 8 Physicochemical Parameters, the 12 Phenolic Compounds,  and Storage Time  The principal component analysis of the indicators in the chart above was applied to  illustrate the correlations between the parameters and browning degree. The changes in  physicochemical parameters were normal physiological phenomena after harvest of fresh  L.brownii bulbs. When stored at −20  °C, the parameters and  the 12 phenolic acids dis‐ played almost discrete distribution and did not show a certain correlation (as shown in  Figure 5). Combined with the data above, the results showed that the life metabolism of  fresh L.brownii bulbs was inhibited, and, except for total polysaccharide level, the changes  in each index level were not significant. With the increase in storage temperature (Figures  6 and 7), the browning degree showed significant correlation with storage time, MDA,  and PPO activity and was closely related to compounds 9, 10, 11, and 12. When exposed  to light at 25 °C (Figure 8), the browning degree had a significant correlation with MDA  and compounds 9, 10, 11, and 12, while it had a very low correlation with PPO activity.  According to the analysis of PPO activity level in Figure 3B, PPO activity was inhibited  by light, but the total polyphenol content increased in the early stage of storage. There‐ fore, PPO activity increased briefly in the early stage of storage, and then it decreased to a    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  14  of  18  low  level.  This  trend  deviated  from  the  variation  trend  of  the  browning  degree  level,  which may lead to the deviation of PPO activity from the browning degree.  Figure 5. Multivariate statistical analysis of each index of G1.  Figure 6. Multivariate statistical analysis of each index of G2.  Figure 7. Multivariate statistical analysis of each index of G3.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  15  of  18  Figure 8. Multivariate statistical analysis of each index of G4. Note: Figures 5 to Figure 8: C‐1 to C‐12 means compound‐1  to compound‐12; RS means reducing sugars; WSP means water‐soluble proteins; BD means browning degree; TPC means  total polysaccharides; TPH means total polyphenols.  While PCA analysis did not show the correlation between browning degree and to‐ tal polysaccharides, free amino acids, water‐soluble proteins, and reducing sugars levels,  it further verified the conclusion that the browning of fresh L.brownii bulbs could not be  explained from the perspective of the Maillard reaction. In addition, the correlation be‐ tween  total  polyphenol  content  and  browning  degree  was  not  significant.  This  was  mainly due to the influence of life metabolism on the level of phenolic compounds. The  accumulation occurred in the early stage, resulting in the difference between the change  in level and browning degree during the whole storage period.   In conclusion, the browning of fresh L.brownii bulbs was mainly related to storage  time; the levels of MDA; PPO; and compounds 9, 10, 11, and 12 but not to the factors of  non‐enzymatic  browning.  Although  the  correlation  between  total  polyphenols  and  browning in L.brownii was not shown statistically, it was found that the phenolic com‐ pounds 9, 10,  11,  and 12 were closely related to  browning.  It is worth noting that the  contents of compounds 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 8 changed significantly. Due to the fact that  their contents increased first and then decreased during the storage period, correlations  with browning could not be found from the statistical point of view, but this could be due  to the fact that they are not related to browning. Therefore, the influence mechanism of  phenolic substrates on browning still need to be further studied; for instance, the reaction  characteristics of PPO with substrate and a control variable, and combined with biologi‐ cal technology could be examined. Further research on the dynamic changes in phenolic  compounds in L.brownii will contribute to explaining not only the browning mechanism  of fresh L.brownii bulbs but also the stress physiological mechanism.  4. Conclusions  In  this  study,  the  results  showed  that  the  contents  of  nutrients  in  fresh  L.brownii  bulbs decreased during the storage period, which was accelerated by light and a high  temperature,  and  the  appearance  became  worse.  However,  while  the  reducing  sugars  and amino acids are the main participants in the Maillard reaction, their content changes  did not match the changes observed for the browning degree.   The  low  temperature  below  freezing  point  can  keep  L.brownii  bulbs  fresh  to  the  maximum  extent.  However,  they  display  obvious  freezing  injury  after  thawing,  and,  thus,  they  should  be  stored  at  a  low  temperature  (above  0  °C)  and  in  the  dark.  The  changes  observed  in  PPO  activity,  total  polyphenols,  and  MDA  content  could  be  de‐ scribed from the perspective of the enzymatic browning mechanism.  Concurrently,  through  the  PCA  of  the  variation  of  8  physicochemical  parameters  and correlation with the 12 phenolic acids, L.brownii browning was observed to be mainly  caused by enzymatic reaction. In addition, the contents of nutrients and the appearance    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  16  of  18  quality decreased when stored in light conditions at room temperature. This led to the  effective accumulation of phenolic acid compounds (phenylpropanoids), which provide  a novel visual angle to develop and utilize phenolic acids in L.brownii and reuse waste  resources.  Author  Contributions:  K.Z.  and  H.X.  conceived  and  designed  the  experiments;  K.Z.  and  Z.X.  performed the experiments and designed the figures; K.Z. analyzed and helped in data interpreta‐ tion;  K.Z.  wrote  the  manuscript;  H.X.  and  J.Z.  edited  and  supported  suggestions  for  the  manu‐ script. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research was funded by the China Agriculture Research System (No. CARS‐21), the  special fund for local science and technology development guided by the central government to  Hunan province (No. 2019XF5074), the special fund for local science and technology development  guided  by  the central  government  (No.  2019XF5061),  the Hunan  Province  Agriculture  Research  System (No. [2019]0047).  Data  Availability  Statement:   The  data  presented  in  this  study  are  available  on  request  from  thecorresponding author.  Conflicts of Interest: All authors have no conflicts of interest.  References  1. Wang,  T.;  Huang,  H.;  Zhang,  Y.;  Li,  X.;  Li,  H.;  Jiang,  Q.;  Gao,  W.  Role  of  effective  composition  on  antioxidant,  an‐ ti‐inflammatory,  sedative‐hypnotic  capacities  of  6  common  edible  Lilium  varieties.  J.  Food  Sci.  2015,  80,  H857–H868,  doi:10.1111/1750‐3841.12787.  2. Chinese Pharmacopoeia Commission. Pharmacopoeia of the People Republic of China; Chinese Medical Science and Technology  Press: Beijing, China, 2020; pp. 132–133.  3. Hou, Y.; Jiang, J.G. Origin and concept of medicine food homology and its application in modern functional foods. Food Funct.  2013, 4, 1727–1741, doi:10.1039/c3fo60295h.  4. Ma, T.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, Y.M.; Luo, J.G.; Kong, L.Y. Bioassay‐guided isolation of anti‐inflammatory components from the  bulbs of Lilium brownii var. viridulum and identifying the underlying mechanism through acting on the NF‐kappaB/MAPKs  Pathway. Molecules 2017, 22, 506, doi:10.3390/molecules22040506.  5. Hong, X.X.; Luo, J.G.; Guo, C.; Kong, L.Y. New steroidal saponins from the bulbs of Lilium brownii var. viridulum. Carbohyd. Res.  2012, 361, 19–26, doi:10.1016/j.carres.2012.07.027.  6. Pan, G.; Xie, Z.; Huang, S.; Tai, Y.; Cai, Q.; Jiang, W.; Sun, J.; Yuan, Y. Immune‐enhancing effects of polysaccharides extracted  from Lilium lancifolium Thunb. Int. Immunopharmacol. 2017, 52, 119–126, doi:10.1016/j.intimp.2017.08.030.  7. Munafo, J.P., Jr.; Gianfagna, T.J. Quantitative analysis of phenylpropanoid glycerol glucosides in different organs of Easter Lily  (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.). J. Agric. Food Chem. 2015, 63, 4836–4842, doi:10.1021/acs.jafc.5b00893.  8. Yuan, Z.Y.; Li, Z.Y.; Zhao, H.Q.; Gao, C.; Xiao, M.W.; Jiang, X.M.; Zhu, J.P.; Huang, H.Y.; Xu, G.M.; Xie, M.Z. Effects of different  drying methods on the chemical constituents of Lilium lancifolium Thunb. based on UHPLC‐MS analysis and antidepressant  activity of the main chemical component regaloside A. J. Sep. Sci. 2020, doi:10.1002/jssc.202000969.  9. Azadi, P.; Khosh‐Khui, M. Micropropagation of Lilium ledebourii (Baker) Boiss as affected by plant growth regulator, sucrose  concentration,  harvesting  season  and  cold  treatments.  Electron.  J.  Biotechnol.  2007,  10,  582–591,  doi:10.2225/vol10‐issue4‐fulltext‐7.  10. Aydin, B.; Gulcin, I.; Alwasel, S.H. Purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from Hemsin Apple (Malus com‐ munis L.). Int. J. Food Prop. 2015, 18, 2735–2745, doi:10.1080/10942912.2015.1012725.  11. Segovia‐Bravo, K.A.; Jarén‐Galán, M.; García‐García, P.; Garrido‐Fernández, A. Browning reactions in olives: Mechanism and  polyphenols involved. Food Chem. 2009, 114, 1380–1385, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2008.11.017.  12. Krzyzanowski, A.; Saleeb, M.; Elofsson, M. Synthesis of Indole‐, Benzo[b]thiophene‐, and Benzo[b] selenophene‐Based Ana‐ logues  of  the  Resveratrol  Dimers  Viniferifuran  and  (+/‐)‐Dehydroampelopsin  B.  Org.  Lett.  2018,  20,  6650–6654,  doi:10.1021/acs.orglett.8b02638.  13. Guerrero, R.F.; Biais, B.; Richard, T.; Puertas, B.; Waffo‐Teguo, P.; Merillon, J.M.; Cantos‐Villar, E. Grapevine cane’s waste is a  source of bioactive stilbenes. Ind. Crop. Prod. 2016, 94, 884–892, doi:10.1016/j.indcrop.2016.09.055.  14. Tsikas, D. Assessment of lipid peroxidation by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) and relatives in biological samples: Ana‐ lytical and biological challenges. Anal. Biochem. 2017, 524, 13–30, doi:10.1016/j.ab.2016.10.021.  15. Saura, D.; Vegara, S.; Marti, N.; Valero, M.; Laencina, J. Non‐enzymatic browning due to storage is reduced by using clarified  lemon  juice  as  acidifier  in  industrial‐scale  production  of  canned  peach  halves.  J.  Food  Sci.  Technol.  2017,  54,  1873–1881,  doi:10.1007/s13197‐017‐2619‐3.  16. Nooshkam, M.; Varidi, M.; Bashash, M. The Maillard reaction products as food‐born antioxidant and antibrowning agents in  model and real food systems. Food Chem. 2019, 275, 644–660, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.09.083.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  17  of  18  17. Cha, J.; Debnath, T.; Lee, K.G. Analysis of alpha‐dicarbonyl compounds and volatiles formed in Maillard reaction model sys‐ tems. Sci. Rep. 2019, 9, 5325, doi:10.1038/s41598‐019‐41824‐8.  18. Farcuh, M.; Copes, B.; Le‐Navenec, G.; Marroquin, J.; Cantu, D.; Bradford, K.J.; Guinard, J.X.; Van Deynze, A. Sensory, physi‐ cochemical and volatile compound analysis of short and long shelf‐life melon (Cucumis melo L.) genotypes at harvest and after  postharvest storage. Food Chem. 2020, 8, 100107, doi:10.1016/j.fochx.2020.100107.  19. Zhu, S.; Feng, L.; Zhang, C.; Bao, Y.; He, Y. Identifying freshness of Spinach leaves stored at different temperatures using hy‐ perspectral imaging. Foods 2019, 8, 356, doi:10.3390/foods8090356.  20. Kan, J.; Xie, W.J.; Wan, B.; Huo, T.B.; Lin, X.P.; Liu, J.; Jin, C.H. Heat‐induced tolerance to browning of fresh‐cut lily bulbs  (Lilium lancifolium Thunb.) under cold storage. J. Food Biochem. 2019, 43, e12816, doi:10.1111/jfbc.12816.  21. Hoch,  W.A.;  Singsaas,  E.L.;  McCown,  B.H.  Resorption  protection.  Anthocyanins  facilitate  nutrient  recovery  in  autumn  by  shielding leaves from potentially damaging light levels. Plant Physiol. 2003, 133, 1296–1305, doi:10.1104/pp.103.027631.  22. Logan, B.A.; Stafstrom, W.C.; Walsh, M.J.L.; Reblin, J.S.; Gould, K.S. Examining the photoprotection hypothesis for adaxial  foliar anthocyanin accumulation by revisiting comparisons of green‐ and red‐leafed varieties of coleus (Solenostemon scutellari‐ oides). Photosynth. Res. 2015, 124, 267–274, doi:10.1007/s11120‐015‐0130‐0.  23. Cho, J.S.; Moon, K.D. Comparison of image analysis methods to evaluate the degree of browning of fresh‐cut lettuce. Food Sci.  Biotechnol. 2014, 23, 1043–1048, doi:10.1007/s10068‐014‐0142‐0.  24. Zhang, J.; Gao, Y.; Zhou, X.; Hu, L.; Xie, T. Chemical characterisation of polysaccharides from Lilium davidii. Nat. Prod. Res. 2010,  24, 357–369, doi:10.1080/14786410903182212.  25. Chen, J.; Wu, S.S.; Liang, R.H.; Liu, W.; Liu, C.M.; Shuai, X.X.; Wang, Z.J. The effect of high speed shearing on disaggregation  and degradation of pectin from creeping fig seeds. Food Chem. 2014, 165, 1–8, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.05.096.  26. Chen, X.; Song, W.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Y. Some physical properties of protein moiety of Alkali‐extracted tea polysac‐ charide conjugates were shielded by its polysaccharide. Molecules 2017, 22, 914, doi:10.3390/molecules22060914.  27. National  Institute  of  Measurement  and  Testing  Technology.  Tea‐Determination of Free Amino Acids Content;  AQSIQ:  Beijing,  China, 2014; Volume GB/T 8314‐2013.  28. Jin, L.; Zhang, Y.; Yan, L.; Guo, Y.; Niu, L. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of bulb extracts of six Lilium species  native to China. Molecules 2012, 17, 9361–9378, doi:10.3390/molecules17089361.  29. Siddiq, M.; Dolan, K.D. Characterization of polyphenol oxidase from blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.). Food Chem. 2017,  218, 216–220, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.09.061.  30. Janero, D.R. Malondialdehyde and thiobarbituric acid‐reactivity as diagnostic indices of lipid peroxidation and peroxidative  tissue injury. Free Radic. Biol. Med. 1990, 9, 515–540, doi:10.1016/0891‐5849(90)90131‐2.  31. Zhao, K.H.; Zhou, F.; Yan, S.E.; Liu, D.B.; Xie, H.Q. The analysis of compounds from Longya Lilium via HPLC‐Q‐TOF‐MS and  HS‐SPME‐GC‐MS. Nat. Prod. Res. Dev. 2020, 32, 1331–1342, doi:10.16333/j.1001‐6880.2020.8.008.  32. Narbona, E.; Jaca, J.; del Valle, J.C.; Valladares, F.; Buide, M.L. Whole‐plant reddening in Silene germana is due to anthocyanin  accumulation in response to visible light. Plant Biol. 2018, 20, 968–977, doi:10.1111/plb.12875.  33. Khan, N.; Ali, S.; Zandi, P.; Mehmood, A.; Ullah, S.; Ikram, M.; Ismail; Shahid, M.A.; Babar, A. Role of Sugars, Amino acids and  organic acids in improving plant abiotic stress tolerance. Pak. J. Bot. 2020, 52, 355–363, doi:10.30848/Pjb2020‐2(24).  34. Sun, Y.J.; Shi, Z.D.; Jiang, Y.P.; Zhang, X.H.; Li, X.A.; Li, F.J. Effects of preharvest regulation of ethylene on carbohydrate me‐ tabolism of apple (Malus domestica Borkh cv. Starkrimson) fruit at harvest and during storage. Sci. Hortic. 2021, 276, 109748,  doi:10.1016/j.scienta.2020.109748.  35. Saddhe, A.A.; Manuka, R.; Penna, S. Plant sugars: Homeostasis and transport under abiotic stress in plants. Physiol. Plant. 2020,  doi:10.1111/ppl.13283.  36. Das,  B.;  Sahoo,  R.N.;  Pargal,  S.;  Krishna,  G.;  Verma,  R.;  Chinnusamy,  V.;  Sehgal,  V.K.;  Gupta,  V.K.;  Dash,  S.K.;  Swain,  P.  Quantitative monitoring of sucrose, reducing sugar and total sugar dynamics for phenotyping of water‐deficit stress tolerance  in  rice  through  spectroscopy  and  chemometrics.  Spectrochim.  Acta  A  Mol.  Biomol.  Spectrosc.  2018,  192,  41–51,  doi:10.1016/j.saa.2017.10.076.  37. Furtauer, L.; Weiszmann, J.; Weckwerth, W.; Nagele, T. Dynamics of plant metabolism during cold acclimation. Int. J. Mol. Sci.  2019, 20, 5411, doi:10.3390/ijms20215411.  38. Huang, Y.H.; Picha, D.H.; Kilili, A.W.; Johnson, C.E. Changes in invertase activities and reducing sugar content in sweetpotato  stored at different temperatures. J. Agric. Food Chem. 1999, 47, 4927–4931, doi:10.1021/jf9902191.  39. Hierl, G.; Vothknecht, U.; Gietl, C. Programmed cell death in Ricinus and Arabidopsis: The function of KDEL cysteine pepti‐ dases in development. Physiol. Plant. 2012, 145, 103–113, doi:10.1111/j.1399‐3054.2012.01580.x.  40. Chodankar,  S.; Aswal, V.K.; Kohlbrecher, J.;  Vavrin,  R.; Wagh, A.G.  Small‐angle  neutron scattering study  of structure  and  kinetics of temperature‐induced protein gelation. Phys. Rev. E 2009, 79, 021912, doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.79.021912.  41. Goldford, J.E.; Hartman, H.; Marsland, R.; Segre, D. Environmental boundary conditions for the origin of life converge to an  organo‐sulfur metabolism. Nat. Ecol. Evol. 2019, 3, 1715–1724, doi:10.1038/s41559‐019‐1018‐8.  42. Park, J.E.; Kim, J.; Purevdorj, E.; Son, Y.J.; Nho, C.W.; Yoo, G. Effects of long light exposure and drought stress on plant growth  and  glucosinolate  production  in  pak  choi  (Brassica  rapa  subsp.  chinensis).  Food  Chem.  2021,  340,  128167,  doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2020.128167.  43. Di Gioia, M.L.; Leggio, A.; Malagrino, F.; Romio, E.; Siciliano, C.; Liguori, A. N‐methylated α‐amino acids and peptides: Syn‐ thesis and biological activity. Mini. Rev. Med. Chem. 2016, 16, 683–690, doi:10.2174/1389557516666160322152457.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  18  of  18  44. Yu, H.; Seow, Y.X.; Ong, P.K.C.; Zhou, W. Kinetic study of high‐intensity ultrasound‐assisted Maillard reaction in a model  system of d‐glucose and glycine. Food Chem. 2018, 269, 628–637, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.07.053.  45. Quan, W.; Wu, Z.L.; Jiao, Y.; Liu, G.P.; Wang, Z.J.; He, Z.Y.; Tao, G.J.; Qin, F.; Zeng, M.M.; Chen, J. Exploring the relationship  between potato components and Maillard reaction derivative harmful products using multivariate statistical analysis.  Food  Chem. 2021, 339, 127853, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2020.127853.  46. Aubert, C.; Chalot, G.; Lurol, S.; Ronjon, A.; Cottet, V. Relationship between fruit density and quality parameters, levels of  sugars, organic acids, bioactive compounds and volatiles of two nectarine cultivars, at harvest and after ripening. Food Chem.  2019, 297, 124954, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2019.124954.  47. Shi, L.Y.; Cao, S.F.; Shao, J.R.; Chen, W.; Yang, Z.F.; Zheng, Y.H. Chinese bayberry fruit treated with blue light after harvest  genes.  Postharvest  Biol.  Technol.  2016,  111,  197–204,  exhibit  enhanced  sugar  production  and  expression  of  cryptochrome  doi:10.1016/j.postharvbio.2015.08.013.  48. Yonny, M.E.; Torressi, A.R.; Nazareno, M.A.; Cerutti, S. Development of a novel, sensitive, selective, and fast methodology to  determine malondialdehyde in leaves of melon plants by ultra‐high‐performance liquid chromatography‐tandem mass spec‐ trometry. J. Anal. Methods Chem. 2017, 2017, 4327954, doi:10.1155/2017/4327954.  49. Yan, S.L.; Yang, T.B.; Luo, Y.G. The mechanism of ethanol treatment on inhibiting lettuce enzymatic browning and microbial  growth. LWT‐Food Sci. Technol. 2015, 63, 383–390, doi:10.1016/j.lwt.2015.03.004.  50. Brillante, L.; De Rosso, M.; Dalla Vedova, A.; Maoz, I.; Flamini, R.; Tomasi, D. Insights on the stilbenes in Raboso Piave grape  (Vitis  vinifera  L.)  as  a  consequence  of  postharvest  vs  on‐vine  dehydration.  J.  Sci.  Food  Agric.  2018,  98,  1961–1967,  doi:10.1002/jsfa.8679.  51. Alfeo, V.; Bravi, E.; Ceccaroni, D.; Sileoni, V.; Perretti, G.; Marconi, O. Effect of baking time and temperature on nutrients and  phenolic compounds content of fresh sprouts breadlike product. Foods 2020, 9, 1447, doi:10.3390/foods9101447.  52. Suleman, P.; Redha, A.; Afzal, M.; Al‐Hasan, R. Temperature‐induced changes of malondialdehyde, heat‐shock proteins in  relation to chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis in Conocarpus lancifolius (Engl.). Acta Physiol. Plant. 2013, 35, 1223–1231,  doi:10.1007/s11738‐012‐1161‐1.  53. Zhang, Z.Y.; Jin, H.B.; Suo, J.W.; Yu, W.Y.; Zhou, M.Y.; Dai, W.S.; Song, L.L.; Hu, Y.Y.; Wu, J.S. Effect of temperature and hu‐ midity on oil quality of harvested Torreya grandis cv. Merrillii nuts during the after‐ripening stage. Front. Plant. Sci. 2020, 11,  573681, doi:10.3389/fpls.2020.573681.  54. Peng, X.Y.; Du, C.; Yu, H.Y.; Zhao, X.Y.; Zhang, X.Y.; Wang, X.Y. Purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase (PPO)  from water yam (Dioscorea alata). CyTA J. Food 2019, 17, 676–684, doi:10.1080/19476337.2019.1634645.  55. Zhang, J.H.; Li, C.Y.; Wei, M.L.; Ge, Y.H.; Tang, Q.; Xue, W.J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Wang, W.H.; Lv, J.Y. Effects of trisodium phosphate  treatment  after  harvest  on  storage  quality  and  sucrose  metabolism  in  jujube  fruit.  J.  Sci.  Food  Agric.  2019,  99,  5526–5532,  doi:10.1002/jsfa.9814.  56. Balasooriya,  H.N.;  Dassanayake,  K.B.;  Seneweera,  S.;  Ajlouni,  S.  Impact  of  elevated  carbon  dioxide  and  temperature  on  strawberry polyphenols. J. Sci. Food Agric. 2019, 99, 4659–4669, doi:10.1002/jsfa.9706.  57. Simsek, M.; Quezada‐Calvillo, R.; Nichols, B.L.; Hamaker, B.R. Phenolic compounds increase the transcription of mouse intes‐ tinal maltase‐glucoamylase and sucrase‐isomaltase. Food Funct. 2017, 8, 1915–1924, doi:10.1039/c7fo00015d.  58. Mo, E.J.; Ahn, J.H.; Jo, Y.H.; Kim, S.B.; Hwang, B.Y.; Lee, M.K. Inositol derivatives and phenolic compounds from the roots of  Taraxacum coreanum. Molecules 2017, 22, 1349, doi:10.3390/molecules22081349.  59. Luo, J.; Li, L.; Kong, L. Preparative separation of phenylpropenoid glycerides from the bulbs of Lilium lancifolium by high‐speed  counter‐current  chromatography  and  evaluation  of  their  antioxidant  activities.  Food  Chem.  2012,  131,  1056–1062,  doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2011.09.112.  60. Yin, L.B.; Liao, C.; Yang, A.L.; Liu, D.; He, P.; Liu, Y.L.; Li, L.L. Effect of the controlled atmosphere storage on the quality of  Lilium brownii bulbs. Int. J. Agric. Biol. 2020, 24, 1607–1613, doi:10.17957/Ijab/15.1601.  61. Li, X.D.; Wu, B.H.; Wang, L.J.; Zheng, X.B.; Yan, S.T.; Li, S.H. Changes in trans‐resveratrol and other phenolic compounds in  grape  skin  and  seeds  under  low  temperature  storage  after  post‐harvest  UV‐irradiation.  J.  Hortic.  Sci.  Biotechnol.  2009,  84,  113–118, doi:10.1080/14620316.2009.11512490.  62. Billet, K.; Houille, B.; Besseau, S.; Melin, C.; Oudin, A.; Papon, N.; Courdavault, V.; Clastre, M.; Giglioli‐Guivarc’h, N.; Lanoue,  A. Mechanical stress rapidly induces E‐resveratrol and E‐piceatannol biosynthesis in grape canes stored as a freshly‐pruned  byproduct. Food Chem. 2018, 240, 1022–1027, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.07.105.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Agriculture Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Effects of Different Storage Conditions on the Browning Degree, PPO Activity, and Content of Chemical Components in Fresh Lilium Bulbs (Lilium brownii F.E.Brown var. viridulum Baker)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/effects-of-different-storage-conditions-on-the-browning-degree-ppo-eZk7bJF8zk
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2021 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2077-0472
DOI
10.3390/agriculture11020184
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Effects of Different Storage Conditions on the Browning   Degree, PPO Activity, and Content of Chemical Components   in Fresh Lilium Bulbs (Lilium brownii F.E.Brown var.   viridulum Baker)  1,2 1,2  1,2 1,2, Kanghong Zhao  , Zhengpeng Xiao  , Jianguo Zeng  and Hongqi Xie  *    National and Reginal Joint Engineering Research Centre for Veterinary Traditional Chinese Medicine   Resources and Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine Innovation, Hunan Agricultural University,  Changsha 410128, China; kanghongz@163.com (K.Z.); x2300379299@163.com (Z.X.);  zengjianguo@hunau.edu.cn (J.Z.)    National Technology Center (Hunan) for Traditional Chinese Medicine Production, Hunan Agricultural  University, Changsha 410128, China  *  Correspondence: xiehongqi@hunau.edu.cn; Tel.: +86‐158‐7400‐1185  Abstract: Although Lilium brownii (L.brownii) bulbs are popular fresh vegetables, a series of quality  problems still remain after harvest. In this study, fresh L.brownii bulbs were placed in the dark at  25, 4, and −20 °C and under light at 25 °C from 0 to 30 days; the chemical compositions were ana‐ lyzed  by  ultraviolet  spectrophotometry  (UV)  and  high‐performance  liquid  chromatography  quadrupole time‐of‐flight mass spectrometry (HPLC‐Q‐TOF‐MS). During the 30‐day storage pe‐ Citation: Zhao, K.; Xiao, Z.; Zeng, J.;  riod, the browning degree increased over the storage time and with increasing temperature, but  Xie, H. Effects of Different Storage  the contents of proteins and free amino acids decreased and were aggravated by light. The total  Conditions on the Browning Degree,  polyphenol content increased until the 6th day at 25 °C (dark or light), but it did not significantly  PPO Activity, and Content of  accumulate at −20 or 4 °C. The reducing sugar content showed a dynamic balance, but the total  Chemical Components in Fresh  polysaccharide content decreased constantly in the four storage conditions. The polyphenol oxi‐ Lilium Bulbs (Lilium brownii  dase (PPO) activity increased with storage time and increasing temperature, while it was inhibited  F.E.Brown var. viridulum Baker.).  by light. The increase rates of malondialdehyde (MDA) content at −20 °C and light (25 °C) were  Agriculture 2021, 11, 184.  higher than those at 4 and 25 °C. In addition, 12 secondary metabolites were identified, most of  https://doi.org/10.3390/  which  accumulated  during  the  storage  period,  for  example,  agriculture11020184  1‐O‐feruloyl‐3‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol;  1,3‐O‐di‐p‐coumaroylglycerol;  1‐O‐feruloyl‐3‐O‐p‐coumaroylglycerol;  and  1,2‐O‐diferuloylglycerol.  The  variations  in  nutrient  Received: 21 January 2021  levels had a low correlation with browning, but the variations in MDA, PPO, and secondary me‐ Accepted: 20 February 2021  tabolite (phenolic acids) levels had a high correlation with browning. In conclusion, fresh L.brownii  Published: 23 February 2021  bulbs should be stored at a low temperature (4 °C) and in dark condition, and browning bulbs are  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neu‐ excellent materials for secondary metabolite utilization.  tral with regard to jurisdictional  claims in published maps and insti‐ Keywords: Lilium bulbs; postharvest; metabolites; principal component analysis  tutional affiliations.  1. Introduction  Copyright:  ©  2021  by  the  authors.  The genus Lilium has over 110 species in the world, of which 55 species are found in  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  China [1]. In  addition,  Lilium  is an important traditional Chinese medicine and edible  This article is an open  access article  food, and it is widely used as a horticultural ornamental plant. Three species of Lilium  distributed  under  the  terms  and  (Lilium  lancifolium  Thunb.,  Lilium  brownii  F.E.Brown  var.  viridulum  Baker.,  and  Lilium  conditions of the Creative Commons  pumilum DC.) have been recorded by Chinese Pharmacopoeia [2] and listed as a medicine  Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  food homology by China’s Ministry of Health [3]. Lilium brownii F.E.Brown var. viridulum  (http://creativecommons.org/licenses /by/4.0/).  Baker. bulbs (L.brownii), with a long medicinal history and active ingredients (such as  Agriculture 2021, 11, 184. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11020184  www.mdpi.com/journal/agriculture  Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  2  of  18  polyphenols,  saponins,  and  polysaccharides)  [4,5],  has  been  shown  to  have  an‐ ti‐inflammatory, anti‐tussive, hypoglycemic, antioxidant, immune‐modulatory, and an‐ ti‐tumor effects [6,7]. Apart from their bioactivities, L.brownii is mainly enjoyed by con‐ sumers for its edible properties. Polysaccharide, protein, amino acids, phospholipid, and  starch (primary metabolites) are probably the most important parameters [8].  Fresh L.brownii bulbs often display a series of quality issues, such as browning, nu‐ trient  loss,  or  secondary  metabolite  transformation  during  the  storage  period,  all  of  which impact the edibleness, medicinal value, and commercial value [9]. The browning  can  be  divided  into  enzymatic  browning  and  non‐enzymatic  browning.  Enzymatic  browning is caused by polyphenol oxidase (PPO) [10]. In the presence of oxygen, phe‐ nolic compounds are oxidized to quinones, and accumulation of quinones on the surface  of tissues causes a brown‐to‐black stripe to form after further non‐enzymatic oxidation  [11]. It is noteworthy that phenolic compounds from L.brownii bulbs are not only sub‐ strates  of  enzymatic  browning  but  secondary  metabolites  with  anti‐inflammatory  and  antioxidant activities. The aim of this study is to explore whether it accumulates under  stress physiology [12], as in stilbenes (as a plant antitoxin and bioactive component [13])  in grapes during storage, which can provide an important basis for its preparation and  utilization. It is of great significance to study the substrate for enzymatic browning and  pharmacological activities of L.brownii bulbs. In addition, due to the regional structure of  cells, enzymes and substrates are in different spaces, and the premise of their contact is  that the cell regionalization is broken. Therefore, malondialdehyde (MDA), as an indi‐ cator of membrane lipid peroxidation, is related to the degree of cell membrane damage  and is also an important indicator for the study of plant physiology and biochemistry  after harvest [14]. Non‐enzymatic browning is mainly caused by the Maillard reaction,  also known as the carbonyl ammonia reaction, which is widely used in the processing of  tea, cocoa, etc., but its detailed mechanism is still unclear [15]. At present, the Maillard  reaction  model  proposed  by  Hodge  is  more  recognized,  and  its  initial  stage  involves  dehydration  condensation  of  amino‐group‐containing  compounds  and  carbon‐ yl‐containing compounds [16]. The amino‐group‐containing compounds mainly refer to  free amino acids, while the carbonyl‐containing compounds mainly point to sugars, es‐ pecially reducing sugars [17]. While at present there is more extensive research on the  browning mechanism than in previous decades, the compounds that are involved in the  browning of fresh L.brownii bulbs are affected by a series of life activities and physico‐ chemical  factors  during  the  storage  period,  and  their  relationship  with  browning  still  needs further characterization.  In general, a plant’s exuberant metabolism makes it easy for a series of physiological  changes to occur in the course of storage, transportation, and sales [18]. Moreover, im‐ proper preservation can also cause deterioration of quality and greatly reduce the nutri‐ tional quality of L.brownii [19]. Despite the rapid development of the logistics industry,  fresh  L.brownii  bulbs  still  need  multiple  procedures,  from  excavation  to  the  finished  product. According to a field survey (Lanzhou, Gansu, China; Longhui and Longshan,  Hunan, China), it takes at least 3–7 days of logistics for it to leave the production area.  The whole process is relatively long, and the quality of L.brownii bulbs is often clearly  reduced. In the process of storage and transportation, L.brownii bulbs often face unsuita‐ ble storage temperatures, and this accelerates the deterioration rate of fresh bulbs [20]. In  the process of offline sales, in order to provide L.brownii bulbs with an excellent outward  appearance,  fluorescent  lamps  are  usually  applied.  However,  this  results  in  apparent  factor changes, of which, the main manifestation is redness [21,22]. At present, even with  mature  preservation  techniques,  addressing  fresh  L.brownii  quality  problems  during  storage and transportation remains a challenge; therefore, it is necessary to analyze the  details of chemical composition variation during fresh L.brownii storage.  In this study, the aims are to (i) study the primary and secondary metabolite content  variation in fresh L.brownii bulbs during storage from the perspective of the browning  mechanism,  thereby  providing  assistance  to  the  study  of  preservation  technology  re‐   Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  3  of  18  garding plant‐derived food; (ii) explore the pathway to improve the yield of secondary  metabolites in L.brownii bulbs.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Chemicals and Instruments  The  formic  acid,  acetonitrile,  and  methanol  used  for  high‐performance  liquid  chromatography  (HPLC)  analysis  were  chromatographic  grade  and  purchased  from  Merck  KGaA  (Shanghai,  China).  The  ethanol,  anthrone,  sulphuric  acid,  glucose,  DNS  (3,5‐dinitrosalicylic  acid),  phenol,  hydrochloric  acid,  sodium  carbonate,  sodium  dihy‐ drogen  phosphate,  disodium  hydrogen  phosphate,  catechol,  guaiacol,  and  hydrogen  peroxide solution were all analytical purity (AR) and obtained from Sinopharm Chemical  Reagent Co., Ltd. (Shanghai, China). The bovine serum albumin (BSA), Coomassie Bright  Blue G‐250, Foline‐phenol, and gallic acid were purchased from Yuan‐ye Bio‐Technology  Co., Ltd. (Shanghai, China).  The  ultraviolet  spectrophotometer  (UV‐1800)  was  purchased  from  Shimadzu  Co.,  Ltd. (Kyoto, Japan). The analytical balance (XS 250) was obtained from METTLER TO‐ LEDO  (Columbus,  OH,  USA).  The  high‐speed  centrifuge  (2‐16R)  was  purchased  from  HENGNUO Instrument Equipment Co., Ltd. (Changsha, Hunan, China).  2.2. Plant Material  Fresh bulbs of L.brownii brownii F.E.Brown var. viridulum Baker. were provided by  Hunan  Lvyuan Agricultural Development co., Ltd. (Shaoyang, Hunan, China) in July,  2019, and identified by Jianguo Zeng, from Hunan Agricultural University. The experi‐ ment was conducted in National Center (Hunan) for Traditional Chinese Medicine Pro‐ duction Technology (E:113.0853°; N:28.1836°), Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha,  China. The bulbs were peeled and washed with cold water, dried surface moisture by  hair drier with cold air blast model, and then stored under 4 conditions: Group 1 (G1)  was placed in a −20 °C refrigerator. Group 2 (G2) was placed in a 4 °C refrigerator. Group  3 (G3) was placed in a dark room (temperature = 25 ± 2 °C). Group 4 (G4) was placed  under the light (d = 60 cm, temperature = 25 ± 2 °C).   The samples were taken randomly once every 6 days during storage process.  2.3. Measurement of Browning Degree  The  browning  degree  was  determined  as  described  by  Jeong‐Seok  Cho  and  Kwang‐Deog Moon [23] with a slight modification. In short, three samples (5.0 ± 0.01 g)  were  randomly sampled, 10  mL 0.2% VC solution was added and homogenized in ice  bath, an additional 15 mL was used to wash the residue to a 50‐mL centrifuge tube. The  homogenate was centrifuged at 8000 rpm for 20 min at 4 °C. After it, the supernatant was  centrifuged again under the same conditions. The absorbance of the resulting solution  was measured at 420 nm, and the 0.2% VC solution used as blank group.  2.4. Measurement of Total Carbohydrates  The extracted and determined methods of total carbohydrates were referred to by Ji  Zhang, et al. [24] with a slight modification. In short, three samples (5.0 ±  0.01 g) were  randomly sampled, 150 mL distilled water was added and homogenized, extracted by  heating in water bath at 65 °C for 6h. Then, the extraction solution was centrifuged at  8000 rpm for 30 min at 4 °C after it cooled to room temperature, 1.0 mL supernatant was  diluted 50 times and taken as the sample to be tested.   The content was quantified using the anthracenone‐sulfuric method at 625 nm and  determined  comparing  the  absorbance  of  sample  with  respect  to  a  standard  curve  of  glucose.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  4  of  18  2.5. Measurement of Total Reducing Sugars  The extracted and determined methods of reducing sugars were referred to by Jun  Chen, et al. [25] with a slight modification. In short, three samples (5.0 ±  0.01 g) were  randomly  sampled,  100  mL  water‐ethanol  (v/v  =  20/80)  was  added  and  homogenized,  using reflux extraction at 85 °C for 1 h. Then, the extraction solution was centrifuged at  8000 rpm for 30 min at 4 °C after it cooled to room temperature, 1.0 mL supernatant was  taken as the sample to be tested.   The content was quantified using the 3,5‐dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method at 540  nm: 1.0 mL sample was mixed with 1.5 mL DNS reagent (2.5 g 3,5‐dinitrosalicylic acid,  0.5 g phenol, 0.075 g sodium nitrite, 2.5 g NaOH, and 50 g KNaC4H4O6∙4H2O were dis‐ solved into a spot of distilled water one by one and then to a constant volume to 50 mL),  and determined by comparing the absorbance of sample with respect to a standard curve  of glucose.  2.6. Measurement the Content of Water‐Soluble Protein  The extracted and determined methods of water‐soluble protein were referred to by  Xiaoqiang Chen, et al. [26] with a slight modification and simplification: three samples  (5.0 ± 0.01 g) were randomly sampled, 100 mL distilled water was added and homoge‐ nized, extracted by heating in water bath at 65 °C for 4 h. Then, the extraction solution  was centrifuged at 8000 rpm for 30 min at 4 °C after it cooled to room temperature, 1.0  mL supernatant was diluted 5 times and taken as the sample to be tested.   The content of water‐soluble protein was quantified using the Coomassie Brilliant  Blue method at 595 nm and determined by comparing the absorbance of sample with  respect to a standard curve of bovine serum albumin (BSA).  2.7. Measurement of Free Amino Acids Content  The extracted and content determined methods of free amino acids were referred to  GB/T 8314‐2013 (Tea‐determination of free amino acids content) [27] with a slight modi‐ fication and simplification: three samples (2.0 ± 0.01 g) were randomly sampled, 100 mL  distilled water was added and homogenized, extracted by heating in water bath at 100 °C  for 1 h. Then, the extraction solution was centrifuged at 12,000 rpm for 30 min at 4 °C af‐ ter  it  cooled  to  room  temperature, 0.5  mL  supernatant  was  taken  as  the  sample  to  be  tested.  The  preparation  of  ninhydrin  solution:  2.0  g  ninhydrin  monohydrate  and  80  mg  stannous chloride were added into 50 mL distilled water, reaction in dark for 24 h after  ultrasonic assisted  dissolution. The supernatant was diluted  to 100  mL after filtration.  Determination method: 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 mg/mL arginine standard solution were  prepared with distilled water, and transfered 0.5 mL into the test tube respectively. Then  0.2 mL phosphate buffer solution (pH = 8.0) and 0.2 mL ninhydrin solution were added.  Finally, it was soaked in boiling water for 15 min, and diluted to 10 mL with distilled  water  after  it  cooled  to  room  temperature  with  ice  water.  The  free  acids  content  was  quantified at 570 nm and determined comparing the absorbance of sample with respect a  standard curve of arginine.  2.8. Measurement of Total Phenolics Content  The extracted and determined methods of total phenolics were referred to by Lei Jin,  et al. [28] with a slight modification: three samples (5.0 ± 0.01 g) were randomly sampled,  100 mL water‐ethanol (v/v = 20/80) was added and homogenized, using ultrasound ex‐ traction at 40 °C for 30 min. Then, the extraction solution was centrifuged at 8000 rpm for  30 min at 4 °C after it cooled to room temperature, 1.0 mL supernatant was taken as the  sample to be tested.     Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  5  of  18  The content of total phenolics was quantified by the Folin‐Ciocalteu method at 765  nm: 1.0 mL sample was mixed with 0.5 mL Folin solution and 1.0 mL 15% Na2CO3 was  added after 5 min, and then constant volume with distilled water to 10 mL. Then, de‐ termined comparing the absorbance of sample with respect to a standard curve of gallic  acid.  2.9. Measurement of Polyphenol Oxidase Activity  The extraction and measurement of PPO were carried out using a modification of  the method of M. Siddiq and K.D. Dolan [29]. Briefly, 2.0 g L.brownii bulbs were blended  in 10 mL of pH 6.0 phosphate buffer and homogenized in an ice bath. Then, centrifuged  at 8000 rpm, 4 °C for 20 min in a refrigerated centrifuge.  The PPO activity measurement: the reaction mixture consisted of 1.0 mL of 0.1 M  catechol in 3.9 mL phosphate buffer (pH = 6.0) and 0.2 mL of PPO extract, determination  after heat preservation at 25 °C for 5 min. The change in absorbance at 420 nm was ob‐ served for 3 min at 25 °C, using an ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The reaction velocity  (V) was calculated from the linear part of the plot of absorbance (A) against time (t). The  unit  of  PPO  activity  was  defined  as  the  change  in  the  absorbance  of  0.001/min  (△A  420nm/min) due to the oxidation of substrate.  2.10. Measurement of MDA Content  The extraction and measurement of MDA were carried out using a modification of  the method of Janero, D. R. [30]. The preparation of test solution: 100 (±5) mg samples  were put into a 2 mL centrifuge tube, 1.0 mL 10% TCA was added, and homogenized  with tissue grinder. The homogenate was centrifuged at 4 °C and 12,000 rpm for 20 min,  and the supernatant was the test solution.  The determination method: 200 μL 10% TCA, test solution and TBA working solu‐ tion (0.68% TBA solution, prepared with 10% TCA) were added into a 2 mL centrifuge  tube. After 15 min of boiling water bath, it was cooled and centrifuged at 4 °C and 12,000  rpm for 10 min. The absorbance values were measured at λ = 450, 532, and 600 nm. The  results were calculated by empirical formula: MDA content (μM) = 6.45 × (A532 nm − A600 nm)  −  0.56  ×  A450  nm;  MDA  content  (μmol/mg)  =  MDA  content  (μM)  ×  extraction  volume  (mL)/fresh weight of tissue (g).  2.11. High‐Performance Liquid Chromatography Quadrupole Time‐of‐Flight Mass Spectrometry  (HPLC‐Q‐TOF‐MS) Conditions  The  HPLC  and  Q‐TOF‐MS  conditions  for  analyzing  phenolic  compounds  were  measured through that reported earlier by Zhao, K.H. et al. [31].   An  Agilent  1260  HPLC  system  (Agilent  Technologies,  Palo  Alto,  CA,  USA),  equipped with a quat pump, an automatic sampler with a 20‐μL sample loop, a thermo‐ stat  of  column,  a  diode  array  detector  (DAD),  and  an  Agilent  ChemStation  (Agilent  Technologies, Palo Alto, CA, USA) had been employed to analyze samples. The mobile  phase was a binary gradient prepared from acetonitrile(B) and a solution of acetic acid  0.1% (v/v) (A). It used the gradient elution procedure: B phase 0–5 min is 10%–12%, 5–20  min is 12%–15%, 20–25 min is 15%–19%, 25–40 min is 19%–30%, 40–50 min is 30%–40%,  50–55  min  is  40%–35%,  55–56  min  is  35%–10%,  56–65min  is  10%–10%.  An  Ag‐ ilent‐ZORBAX SB‐C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm, Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto,  CA, USA) was performed for the chromatographic separation of total polyphenol extract.  Identification of mass spectrum was employed on an accurate mass spectrometer of  Agilent 6530 Q‐TOF‐MS (Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA, USA). Chromatographic  separation was employed on an Agilent‐ZORBAX SB‐C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5  μm,  Agilent Technologies,  Palo  Alto,  CA, USA), and  the  effluent  of the  HPLC  mobile  phase was split and guided into the electrospray ionization (ESI) source. Parameter con‐ ditions were performed as following: negative mode, capillary voltage, 3500 V; nebulizer    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  6  of  18  pressure, 50 psi; nozzle voltage, 1000 V; flow rate of drying gas, 6 L/min; temperature of  sheath gas, 350 °C; flow rate of sheath gas, 11 L/min; skimmer voltage, 65 V; OCT1 RF  Vpp, 750 V; fragmentor voltage, 135 V. The spectra data were recorded in the range of  m/z 100–1000 Da in a centroid pattern of full‐scan MS analysis mode. The MS/MS data of  the selected compounds were obtained by regulating diverse collision energy (10–30 eV).  2.12. Statistical Analysis  Data were presented as the mean ± standard deviation from at least three different  experiments. All data of all groups were analyzed by one‐way ANOVA using SPSS (ver‐ sion 23.0). All contents were expressed as dry matter. Line graphs were drawn by Origin  (version 2018). Principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted with SIMCA 14.1.  The  Materials  and  Methods  should  be  described  with  sufficient  details  to  allow  others to replicate and build on the published results. Please note that the publication of  your manuscript implicates that you must make all materials, data, computer code, and  protocols  associated  with  the  publication  available  to  readers.  Please  disclose  at  the  submission  stage  any  restrictions  on  the  availability  of  materials  or  information.  New  methods and protocols should be described in detail while well‐established methods can  be briefly described and appropriately cited.  Research  manuscripts  reporting  large  datasets  that  are  deposited  in  a  publicly  available database should specify where the data have been deposited and provide the  relevant accession numbers. If the accession numbers have not yet been obtained at the  time of submission, please state that they will be provided during review. They must be  provided prior to publication.  Interventionary studies involving animals or humans, and other studies that require  ethical approval, must list the authority that provided approval and the corresponding  ethical approval code.  3. Results and Discussion  3.1. Variation in Browning and Contents of Primary Metabolites during Storage Periods  As shown in Figure 1, the browning of fresh L.brownii bulbs was not obvious under  the low temperature, while it increased with the increase in storage time and tempera‐ ture. In addition, the process was accelerated by light [32].  Figure 1. Variation curve of browning degree under four storage conditions.  Protein,  amino  acids,  and  sugars  are  the  major  primary  metabolites  in  L.brownii  bulbs [33]. As shown in Figure 2A, the total polysaccharide content showed a downward    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  7  of  18  trend  during  the  30‐day  storage  process.  This  indicates  that  carbohydrate  metabolism  still exists in plants under different storage conditions [34]. G1 and G2 maintained the  same changing trend, which was higher than that of other groups, and they showed that  refrigeration and cryopreservation weaken the life metabolism of L.brownii bulbs. When  considering  the  effects  of  light,  we  observed  that  the  contents  of  G3  were  lower  than  those of G4, suggesting that the sugar metabolism of bulbs was more vigorous under the  condition of avoiding light.   Figure 2. Variation curves of four primary metabolites under four storage conditions.  As shown in Figure 2B, the reducing sugar contents of G1, G2, and G3 increased  with temperature and clearly increased under light (G4) until the 6th day. In the early  stage of storage, the plant maintained relatively vigorous vitality and a faster metabolic  rate, which increased the content of reducing sugars. During the period from day 6 to 12,  the content of each group decreased. This may be because reducing sugars usually pro‐ vide energy for plant life activities, and plant tissues were still active before the 12th day  [35].  After  the  12th  day,  the  consumption  rate  of  reducing  sugars  was  lower  than  the  production rate (reducing sugars are the degradation products of polysaccharides [36]),  with the vitality of the bulbs gradually decreasing (thereby causing a decline in energy  demand [37]) [38]. Thus, the content of reducing sugars increased slightly.  Proteins and amino acids are involved in a variety of  plant life activities [39]. As  shown  in  Figure  2C,  the  water‐soluble  protein  contents  of  G1  and  G2  maintained  the  same level during the same period. This may be due to the low life activity of plant tissue  and the stable protein structure at a  low temperature [40]. Moreover, the  two groups’  contents were higher than those of G3 and G4. The reason for this may be the decrease in  water‐soluble  protein  content  for  the  strengthened  life  metabolism  without  a  source  supply of N with the increase in storage temperature [41]. In addition, the water‐soluble  protein content of G4 decreased sharply and was significantly lower than that of other  groups in the later stage. This may be due to the fact that the plant tissues were stimu‐ lated by light and accelerated the life metabolism rate [42].    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  8  of  18  Amino acids are the basic unit of protein [43]. The results showed that the change  trend of free amino acid content in fresh L.brownii was similar to that of the protein under  different storage conditions (Figure 2D). The difference is that the life activity of G1 was  inhibited by the low temperature below 0 °C, which caused the content change to not be  significant. The bulb tissue of G2 was stored at a low temperature and maintained weak  life activity, meaning that amino acids showed a slow downward trend. The contents of  G3 and G4 significantly decreased because the temperature was suitable for their life ac‐ tivities. However, the changes in free amino acid content only showed a relationship with  storage temperature and did not show the effect of light.  According to Hodge’s Maillard reaction model, the substrates in the initial stage of  the model are compounds containing amino and carbonyl groups [44]. The results above  show  that,  in  the  storage  process,  the  contents  of  the  total  polysaccharides,  wa‐ ter‐solubility  proteins,  and  free  amino  acids  displayed  a  negative  correlation  with  the  change trend of the browning degree. Assuming that the Maillard reaction occurred, the  content  of  carbonyl  compounds  should  maintain  a  high  negative  correlation  with  the  browning degree [45]. G1 displayed unclear browning in the storage process (Figure 1).  However, the content of total polysaccharides in this group still decreased, and the amino  compounds  did  not  show  a  similar  trend.  The  content  variations  of  the  two  reaction  substrates lacked consistency. This indicates that the changes in contents of the four nu‐ trients were not the material basis for L.brownii browning. Thus, it was not possible to  consider the notion that carbonyl and amino compounds participate in the reaction. The  occurrence of the Maillard reaction could not be judged. Therefore, it can be suggested  that the changes in contents of carbonyl compounds and amino compounds were caused  by the physiological mechanism of adversity during the storage period [46,47].  3.2. Variation in PPO Activity and Contents of MDA and Total Polyphenols during Storage  Periods   MDA levels indirectly reflect the degree of cell damage [48]. The increase in MDA  levels  suggested that the cell  was damaged,  which provided  conditions for  oxygen to  enter cells, and the accumulation of phenolic compounds provided sufficient substrate  for  PPO  [49].  Phenolic  compounds  are  secondary  metabolites  of  plants;  they  not  only  have pharmacological activities but are plant antitoxins [50]. As shown in Figure 3, the  total polyphenol content was the lowest in G1, because the synthesis of phenolic com‐ pounds is inhibited by low temperature [51]. However, its content decreased slightly due  to the influence of polyphenol oxidase, and MDA content increased as a result of freezing  injury [52].    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  9  of  18  Figure 3. Variation curves of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, total polyphenols, and  malondialdehyde (MDA) contents under four storage conditions.  As the temperature increased up to 4 °C, MDA content appeared lower than that of  the other groups. Therefore, there was no obvious accumulation of phenolic compounds.  Phenolic compounds would have been slightly consumed for the remaining weak activ‐ ity  of  PPO,  leading  to  weak  browning.  However,  the  bulbs  of  G3  were  in  an  active  physiological state, and the adverse factors, such as nutrient deficiency and water loss,  still caused tissue damage [53]. This led to the increased MDA content and accumulation  of phenolic compounds, which provided sufficient substrate for enzymatic reaction in the  early stage of storage (until the 6th day). At the same time, this temperature was within  the best activity temperature range of PPO, and therefore, PPO activity increased [54].  These factors caused the browning degree of G3 to be higher than that of G1 and G2.  However, the metabolic capacity of tissue decreases as nutrients are consumed during  storage  periods  [55].  This  caused  the  contents  of  phenolic  compounds  to  begin  to  de‐ crease  after  the  6th  day.  PPO  activity  gradually  became  inactivate,  meaning  that  the  contents of phenolic compounds maintained a stable level in the later stage of storage (on  the 24th day). Plant respiration was aggravated by light (G4), and the tissues showed    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  10  of  18  severe physiological phenomenon and damage (MDA content increased rapidly), leading  to  the  aggravated  browning.  G4  and  G3  showed  similar  metabolic  processes  during  storage, and, different to G3, PPO was passivated by long‐time light. Consequently, the  PPO activity of G4 decreased rapidly after the 6th day.   The  results  show  that  the  total  polyphenol  content  was  closely  related  to  storage  conditions.  The  low temperature  inhibited  the increase in total  polyphenol  content  by  inhibiting plant vitality [56]. Moreover, light enhanced the stress resistance physiology of  plants, which aggravated the accumulation of total polyphenols in the short storage pe‐ riod.  In summary, during the storage of fresh L.brownii bulbs, the stress of adversity in‐ duced tissue damage, which led to the phenolic compounds being oxidized by PPO and  the occurrence of the enzymatic reaction. With the weakening of life activities and the  consumption  of  the  enzymatic  reaction,  the  content  of  phenolic  compounds  gradually  decreased. The PPO was passivated by temperature and light with the increase in storage  time,  which  caused  the  intensity  of  the  enzymatic  reaction  to  decrease.  Finally,  the  browning degree reached a high level, and the content of phenolic compounds reached  the equilibrium state. Therefore, the physical and chemical parameter variation of fresh  L.brownii bulbs during the storage period could be explained more reasonably from the  perspective of the enzymatic browning mechanism.  3.3. Identification of Phenolic Compounds Via High‐Performance Liquid Chromatography  Quadrupole Time‐of‐Flight Mass Spectrometry (HPLC‐Q‐TOF‐MS)  The phenolic compounds are secondary metabolites of plants, which have a wide  range of biological activities, such as anti‐inflammatory, antioxidant, anti‐aging, and an‐ tidepressant properties [57,58]. According to the report of Luo et al. [59], the phenolic  compounds in  L.brownii are mainly  phenylpropanoids,  which have significant antioxi‐ dant activity. In our previous study [30], the 12 phenolic acids from L.brownii bulbs were  identified  via  liquid  chromatography  quadrupole  time‐of‐flight  mass  spectrometry  (LC‐Q‐TOF‐MS) and analysis in negative ion mode. The 12 compounds are as follows:  1‐O‐caffeoyl‐3‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol  (compound‐1);  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐3‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol  (compound‐2);  1‐O‐caffeoyl‐3‐O‐p‐coumaroylglycerol(compound‐3);  1‐O‐caffeoyl‐2‐O‐p‐coumaroylglycerol(compound‐4);  1‐O‐feruloyl‐2‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol(compound‐5);  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐2‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosyl‐3‐O‐acetylglycerol  (compound‐6);  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐2‐O‐hydroxymethy‐3‐O‐acetylglycerol  (compound‐7);  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐2‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosyl‐3‐O‐acetylglycerol  (compound‐8);  1‐O‐feruloyl‐3‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol(compound‐9);  1,3‐O‐di‐p‐coumaroylglycerol(compound‐10);  1‐O‐feruloyl‐3‐O‐p‐coumaroylglycerol(compound‐11);  1,2‐O‐diferuloylglycerol(compound‐12).   They are mainly composed of coumarin acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid, which are  connected by one molecule of glycerol, and the glycerol group are formed by para/ortho  substitution  or  glucose  substitution/acetylation.  Hence,  these  compounds  belong  to  phenolic  glycerides/glycosides  (phenylpropanoid  compounds),  and  are  called  “regalo‐ sides” in some studies [7].  However,  the  contents  of  other  phenylpropanoids,  except  for  1‐O‐caffeoyl‐3‐O‐p‐coumaroylglycerol,  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐2‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosyl‐3‐O‐acetylglycerol,  1‐O‐p‐coumaroyl‐2‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol,  and  1‐O‐feruloyl‐3‐O‐β‐D‐glucopyranosylglycerol, are very low in the fresh L.brownii bulbs,  which caused the cost of isolation and purification to be very high. This restricts the de‐ velopment  and  utilization  of  regalosides  and  indicates  that  the  phenylpropanoids  in  L.brownii still have great research space.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  11  of  18  3.4. Analysis of the Relative Contents of the 12 Compounds via HPLC.  The data above show that the content of phenolic compounds is usually low in fresh  L.brownii bulbs, which leads to the high cost of separation and purification. This is a bar‐ rier for the development and utilization of secondary metabolites from L.brownii bulbs.  As shown in Figures 3A and 4, the content of total polyphenols has an obvious accumu‐ lation phenomenon during storage, and the main phenolic compounds in L.brownii bulbs  are the 12 phenylpropanoids. Therefore, to characterize the content variation of the 12  compounds in this section, HPLC was used. The results (Tables 1 and 2) showed that the  relative contents of the compounds did not change significantly when stored at 4 °C and  −20 °C. This illustrated the notion that the L.brownii bulbs’ life activities were weak and  that bulbs were in a state of approximate dormancy. However, the relative contents of all  compounds increased significantly under a temperature of 25 °C in light conditions for 30  days (Tables 3 and 4). This suggested that the L.brownii bulbs’ life activities did not stop  immediately  after  harvest  and  that  the  phenolic  acid  compounds  accumulated  under  stress. In addition, Yin, L. B. et al. also reported that the contents of saponins, flavonoids,  and polyphenols were relatively stable in the early stage (1–5 weeks) via controlled at‐ mosphere storage, indicating that storage conditions had a significant effect on the con‐ tent of secondary metabolites of L.brownii bulbs [60].  Figure 4. The high‐performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) chromatogram of fresh L.brownii.  Table 1. The relative contents of the 12 compounds stored at −20 °C for 30 days.  Storage Time (d  0  6  12  18  24  30  Compound‐1  107.06 ± 1.12  104.74 ± 4.01  134.35 ± 3.37 a  143.99 ± 3.24  173.91 ± 0.91a  232.56 ± 14.82 a  Compound‐2  269.81 ± 0.77  366.66 ± 21.92 a  468.30 ± 12.85 a  370.04 ± 25.44 a  350.94 ± 18.63  350.21 ± 9.19  Compound‐3  3792.36 ± 10.64  3328.57 ± 41.58  4510.88 ± 37.21 b  3879.37 ± 29.17 a  3959.79 ± 31.76  3818.84 ± 44.48  Compound‐4  82.43 ± 1.90  50.01 ± 2.33 a  44.24 ± 5.14  48.79 ± 2.23  49.45 ± 2.00  51.25 ± 2.33  Compound‐5  138.55 ± 8.09  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  Compound‐6  38.17 ± 6.24  58.65 ± 6.74  123.35 ± 8.91 a  225.67 ± 13.11 a  224.93 ± 6.27  153.44 ± 0.67 a  Compound‐7  65.15 ± 1.94  663.53 ± 11.77 b  110.70 ± 0.19  179.63 ± 10.95  124.48 ± 7.34  104.61 ± 27.98  Compound‐8  1902.94 ± 20.62  1920.21 ± 34.19  2844.26 ± 27.14 a  2431.70 ± 21.32  1731.18 ± 19.50 a  1741.15 ± 25.31  Compound‐9  57.18 ± 3.13  0.00  0.00  0.00  49.11 ± 2.13 b  0.00  Compound‐10  57.13 ± 2.75  0.00  0.00  0.00  51.14 ± 4.41 b  0.00  Compound‐11  318.89 ± 10.10  165.03 ± 7.99 b  144.05 ± 11.36  124.77 ± 18.62  246.62 ± 9.93 a  59.35 ± 4.04 b  Compound‐12  245.41 ± 4.59  108.06 ± 9.68b  102.88 ± 4.40  108.51 ± 3.90  200.88 ± 6.75 a  68.01 ± 4.62 b  Note: a—compared with the former group, p < 0.05; b—compared with the former group, p < 0.01.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  12  of  18  Table 2. The relative contents of the 12 compounds stored at 4 °C for 30 days.  Stor age Time (d  0  6  12  18  24  30  Compound‐1  107.06 ± 1.12  123.90 ± 6.10  243.12 ± 7.70 a  338.23 ± 9.65 a  332.02 ± 5.49  462.35 ± 2.02 a  Compound‐2  269.81 ± 0.77  433.41 ± 16.06 b  464.93 ± 23.19  489.99 ± 8.06  331.14 ± 28.23 b  300.34 ± 11.62 a  Compound‐3  3792.36 ± 10.64  4467.63 ± 79.88 a  8097.52 ± 46.85 b  6808.66 ± 35.17 b  4548.36 ± 69.95 b  4867.97 ± 63.97  Compound‐4  82.43 ± 1.90  126.53 ± 9.02 a  71.00 ± 7.95 a  78.89 ± 2.82  60.55 ± 4.70 a  53.73 ± 3.47 a  Compound‐5  138.55 ± 8.09  593.93 ± 65.00 b  350.00 ± 44.35 b  310.76 ± 7.62  182.95 ± 3.43 b  137.18 ± 6.71 a  Compound‐6  38.17 ± 6.24  50.49 ± 2.46  106.06 ± 8.87 a  344.63 ± 9.50 b  126.13 ± 6.70 b  88.22 ± 2.24 a  Compound‐7  65.15 ± 1.94  1065.39 ± 22.50 b  1175.18 ± 86.93  979.67 ± 18.98  979.87 ± 55.00  676.12 ± 52.29 b  Compound‐8  1902.94 ± 20.62  2011.81 ± 39.71  3834.91 ± 57.62 b  3175.96 ± 78.49 a  3276.26 ± 15.89  1822.14 ± 78.29 b  Compound‐9  57.18 ± 3.13  51.12 ± 3.40  40.71 ± 3.45  142.48 ± 8.46 b  77.15 ± 7.65 b  37.51 ± 7.52 b  Compound‐10  57.13 ± 2.75  99.40 ± 6.42  148.64 ± 8.96 a  137.33 ± 9.57  206.54 ± 4.25 b  219.61 ± 13.09  Compound‐11  318.89 ± 10.10  312.24 ± 9.63  436.58 ± 32.42 b  466.44 ± 41.59  695.25 ± 5.25 b  588.63 ± 55.47 a  Compound‐12  245.41 ± 4.59  295.42 ± 9.24  295.20 ± 11.78  320.14 ± 6.19 a  322.86 ± 4.01  656.28 ± 20.75 b  Note: a—compared with the former group, p < 0.05; b—compared with the former group, p < 0.01.  Table 3. The relative contents of the 12 compounds stored at 25 °C for 30 days.  Storage Time (d   0  6  12  18  24  30  Compound‐1  107.06 ± 1.12  806.38 ± 83.77 b   418.99 ± 50.57 b   390.23 ± 44.67  354.21 ± 70.30  312.80 ± 26.72 a   Compound‐2  269.81 ± 0.77  507.73 ± 63.91 b   280.24 ± 23.62 b   221.42 ± 17.38 a   208.48 ± 10.41  203.13 ± 9.90  Compound‐3  3792.36 ± 10.64  10447.69 ± 90.12 b   7129.24 ± 54.92 b   6726.39 ± 62.35 a   6118.67 ± 39.33  5647.84 ± 7.67 a   Compound‐4  82.43 ± 1.90  86.91 ± 5.02  88.66 ± 2.03  95.75 ± 3.13  115.36 ± 9.63 a   92.61 ± 3.20a   Compound‐5  138.55 ± 8.09  501.10 ± 25.35 b   327.10 ± 7.31 a   323.20 ± 7.74  332.48 ± 8.64  385.84 ± 13.15  Compound‐6  38.17 ± 6.24  231.16 ± 10.56 b   210.94 ± 14.86  200.58 ± 9.78  164.02 ± 7.95 a   116.74 ± 7.85 a   Compound‐7  65.15 ± 1.94  1079.15 ± 62.58 b   1166.15 ± 48.29  1170.79 ± 22.29  2527.22 ± 14.50 b   3082.76 ± 36.60 b   Compound‐8  1902.94 ± 20.62  3532.78 ± 15.72 b   2792.35 ± 24.80 a   2293.82 ± 63.50 a   1922.79 ± 41.07 a   1772.28 ± 10.83  Compound‐9  57.18 ± 3.13  231.57 ± 14.57 b   235.06 ± 5.83  246.37 ± 14.22  211.59 ± 8.64  405.21 ± 10.64 b   Compound‐10  57.13 ± 2.75  188.33 ± 9.84 b   221.71 ± 18.02 a   245.49 ± 16.89  294.58 ± 7.97  442.28 ± 14.73 b   Compound‐11  318.89 ± 10.10  1298.38 ± 77.36 b   1372.30 ± 85.52  1462.44 ± 28.18  1630.94 ± 34.05 a   2534.24 ± 23.97 b   Compound‐12  245.41 ± 4.59  731.93 ± 33.76 b   879.45 ± 13.08 a   878.87 ± 23.88  1167.70 ± 34.13 a   2034.22 ± 9.88 b   Note: a—compared with the former group, p < 0.05; b—compared with the former group, p < 0.01.  Table 4. The relative contents of the 12 compounds stored under light (25 °C) for 30 days.  Storage Time (d)  0  6  12  18  24  30  Compound‐1  107.06 ± 1.12  1508.49 ± 5.82 b  1220.13 ± 18.94 a  1240.64 ± 3.16  1352.80 ± 7.60  856.40 ± 12.81 b  Compound‐2  269.81 ± 0.77  557.64 ± 8.25 b  398.62 ± 4.02 a  365.16 ± 3.84  318.01 ± 8.09  131.95 ± 3.58 b  Compound‐3  3792.36 ± 10.64  19552.51 ± 66.80 b  14076.69 ± 58.97 a  12216.46 ± 21.20  15310.31 ± 28.22  6343.77 ± 22.20 b  Compound‐4  82.43 ± 1.90  168.95 ± 25.18 a  172.03 ± 6.17  184.10 ± 8.10  738.79 ± 13.22 b  160.86 ± 4.11  Compound‐5  138.55 ± 8.09  761.45 ± 17.77 b  565.31 ± 14.00 a  528.32 ± 11.05  476.00 ± 9.13  396.46 ± 4.66 a  Compound‐6  38.17 ± 6.24  232.56 ± 13.55 b  319.51 ± 9.52 a  427.66 ± 5.58 a  345.16 ± 7.80  258.99 ± 6.78 a  Compound‐7  65.15 ± 1.94  96.74 ± 4.62 a  106.42 ± 2.64  118.95 ± 5.44  146.34 ± 5.92 a  97.07 ± 2.11 a  Compound‐8  1902.94 ± 20.62  5711.26 ± 24.24 b  5912.23 ± 30.81  7707.86 ± 63.75 b  5743.15 ± 16.20 b  1777.04 ± 11.74 b  Compound‐9  57.18 ± 3.13  305.86 ± 28.12 b  347.67 ± 14.84 a  337.14 ± 8.86  369.30 ± 11.72  604.24 ± 21.24 b  Compound‐10  57.13 ± 2.75  251.67 ± 2.22 b  330.60 ± 18.74 a  368.88 ± 20.24  399.97 ± 15.89  441.66 ± 6.57 a  Compound‐11  318.89 ± 10.10  1918.76 ± 6.46 b  2182.49 ± 46.31  2000.44 ± 18.32  2225.78 ± 35.09  3083.81 ± 28.07 b  Compound‐12  245.41 ± 4.59  1173.02 ± 28.34 b  1429.78 ± 37.72 a  1448.31 ± 28.67  1528.76 ± 9.81  2548.10 ± 16.24 b  Note: a—compared with the former group, p < 0.05; b—compared with the former group, p < 0.01.  When stored at 25 °C (as shown in Table 3), the relative contents of compounds 1, 2,  3, 5, 6, 8, and 11 reached the maximum value at the early stage of storage (until the 6th  day),  and  compound  4  reached  the  maximum  value  on  the  24th  day.  However,  their  contents all  decreased  after  reaching  the  maximum  value.  This  may  be  caused  by  the  weakening of life metabolism. When the life metabolism became weak, phenolic com‐ pounds accumulated to a lesser extent and were consumed by oxidase, resulting in con‐ sumption being greater than generation. The contents of compounds 7, 9, 10, and 12 were    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  13  of  18  very low in the early stage of storage; the contents were not stable until the later stage of  storage (after the 27th day); and their cumulative amounts reached the maximum. Thus,  it appears that they were in a continuous accumulation state during the storage process  [61].  Under a temperature of 4 °C (as shown in Table 2), the life metabolism of L.brownii  bulbs were weakened, and the water loss was not obvious (stored in refrigerator). This  indicates that L.brownii bulbs were in a dormant state; thus, the accumulation of phenolic  compounds  was  not  significant.  When  stored  at −20  °C  (as  shown  in  Table  1),  the  12  compounds almost did not show phenomenon of accumulation. This indicates that the  life activities of L.brownii were basically stopped at −20 °C. When the life metabolism of  fresh L.brownii bulbs was inhibited by a low temperature, the contents of the 12 phenolic  acids also changed slightly. Notably, with the increase in storage time, the metabolism  ability of fresh L.brownii bulbs was gradually lost under a temperature of −20 °C, result‐ ing in the decrease in each of these compounds.  As shown in Table 4, the relative contents of compounds 1, 2, 3, and 5 reached the  maximum value on the 6th day. Unlike G3, there was a shift in the time when the relative  contents of compounds 6, 8, and 11 reached their maximum values. The maximum rela‐ tive content of each compound in G4 was significantly higher than that in the other three  groups. The results show that the contents of phenolic acids in L.brownii bulbs increased  rapidly when exposed to sunlight, which is similar to the results of French scholars on  grapevine cutting [62]. The higher the degree of plant damage, the more obvious the ac‐ cumulation of plant antitoxins. However, the stronger stress conditions aggravated the  respiration of plants, making the plant tissue lose water and die quickly. After the 6th  day, the L.brownii bulb tissues were seriously damaged due to the light. Eventually, they  lost  their  vitality,  which  resulted  in  the  interruption  of  their  synthesis.  Moreover,  the  consumption of other pathways and the degradation of the compounds still existed un‐ der strong light conditions, which finally contributed to the decrease in compound con‐ tent.  In conclusion, the contents of phenolic acid compounds in fresh L.brownii bulbs were  very  low.  In  addition,  the  content  of  phenolic  compounds  was  accumulated  in  bulbs  under adverse conditions. In fact, L.brownii bulbs being damaged by sale delay or other  factors is inevitable. L.brownii without commercial value could be used for the extraction  and separation of phenolic acids to avoid the waste of resources. Furthermore, the ac‐ cumulation of compounds through stress physiology is an effective way to improve the  utilization rate of L.brownii resources and the development of phenolic acids.  3.5. Principal Component Analysis of 8 Physicochemical Parameters, the 12 Phenolic Compounds,  and Storage Time  The principal component analysis of the indicators in the chart above was applied to  illustrate the correlations between the parameters and browning degree. The changes in  physicochemical parameters were normal physiological phenomena after harvest of fresh  L.brownii bulbs. When stored at −20  °C, the parameters and  the 12 phenolic acids dis‐ played almost discrete distribution and did not show a certain correlation (as shown in  Figure 5). Combined with the data above, the results showed that the life metabolism of  fresh L.brownii bulbs was inhibited, and, except for total polysaccharide level, the changes  in each index level were not significant. With the increase in storage temperature (Figures  6 and 7), the browning degree showed significant correlation with storage time, MDA,  and PPO activity and was closely related to compounds 9, 10, 11, and 12. When exposed  to light at 25 °C (Figure 8), the browning degree had a significant correlation with MDA  and compounds 9, 10, 11, and 12, while it had a very low correlation with PPO activity.  According to the analysis of PPO activity level in Figure 3B, PPO activity was inhibited  by light, but the total polyphenol content increased in the early stage of storage. There‐ fore, PPO activity increased briefly in the early stage of storage, and then it decreased to a    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  14  of  18  low  level.  This  trend  deviated  from  the  variation  trend  of  the  browning  degree  level,  which may lead to the deviation of PPO activity from the browning degree.  Figure 5. Multivariate statistical analysis of each index of G1.  Figure 6. Multivariate statistical analysis of each index of G2.  Figure 7. Multivariate statistical analysis of each index of G3.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  15  of  18  Figure 8. Multivariate statistical analysis of each index of G4. Note: Figures 5 to Figure 8: C‐1 to C‐12 means compound‐1  to compound‐12; RS means reducing sugars; WSP means water‐soluble proteins; BD means browning degree; TPC means  total polysaccharides; TPH means total polyphenols.  While PCA analysis did not show the correlation between browning degree and to‐ tal polysaccharides, free amino acids, water‐soluble proteins, and reducing sugars levels,  it further verified the conclusion that the browning of fresh L.brownii bulbs could not be  explained from the perspective of the Maillard reaction. In addition, the correlation be‐ tween  total  polyphenol  content  and  browning  degree  was  not  significant.  This  was  mainly due to the influence of life metabolism on the level of phenolic compounds. The  accumulation occurred in the early stage, resulting in the difference between the change  in level and browning degree during the whole storage period.   In conclusion, the browning of fresh L.brownii bulbs was mainly related to storage  time; the levels of MDA; PPO; and compounds 9, 10, 11, and 12 but not to the factors of  non‐enzymatic  browning.  Although  the  correlation  between  total  polyphenols  and  browning in L.brownii was not shown statistically, it was found that the phenolic com‐ pounds 9, 10,  11,  and 12 were closely related to  browning.  It is worth noting that the  contents of compounds 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 8 changed significantly. Due to the fact that  their contents increased first and then decreased during the storage period, correlations  with browning could not be found from the statistical point of view, but this could be due  to the fact that they are not related to browning. Therefore, the influence mechanism of  phenolic substrates on browning still need to be further studied; for instance, the reaction  characteristics of PPO with substrate and a control variable, and combined with biologi‐ cal technology could be examined. Further research on the dynamic changes in phenolic  compounds in L.brownii will contribute to explaining not only the browning mechanism  of fresh L.brownii bulbs but also the stress physiological mechanism.  4. Conclusions  In  this  study,  the  results  showed  that  the  contents  of  nutrients  in  fresh  L.brownii  bulbs decreased during the storage period, which was accelerated by light and a high  temperature,  and  the  appearance  became  worse.  However,  while  the  reducing  sugars  and amino acids are the main participants in the Maillard reaction, their content changes  did not match the changes observed for the browning degree.   The  low  temperature  below  freezing  point  can  keep  L.brownii  bulbs  fresh  to  the  maximum  extent.  However,  they  display  obvious  freezing  injury  after  thawing,  and,  thus,  they  should  be  stored  at  a  low  temperature  (above  0  °C)  and  in  the  dark.  The  changes  observed  in  PPO  activity,  total  polyphenols,  and  MDA  content  could  be  de‐ scribed from the perspective of the enzymatic browning mechanism.  Concurrently,  through  the  PCA  of  the  variation  of  8  physicochemical  parameters  and correlation with the 12 phenolic acids, L.brownii browning was observed to be mainly  caused by enzymatic reaction. In addition, the contents of nutrients and the appearance    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  16  of  18  quality decreased when stored in light conditions at room temperature. This led to the  effective accumulation of phenolic acid compounds (phenylpropanoids), which provide  a novel visual angle to develop and utilize phenolic acids in L.brownii and reuse waste  resources.  Author  Contributions:  K.Z.  and  H.X.  conceived  and  designed  the  experiments;  K.Z.  and  Z.X.  performed the experiments and designed the figures; K.Z. analyzed and helped in data interpreta‐ tion;  K.Z.  wrote  the  manuscript;  H.X.  and  J.Z.  edited  and  supported  suggestions  for  the  manu‐ script. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research was funded by the China Agriculture Research System (No. CARS‐21), the  special fund for local science and technology development guided by the central government to  Hunan province (No. 2019XF5074), the special fund for local science and technology development  guided  by  the central  government  (No.  2019XF5061),  the Hunan  Province  Agriculture  Research  System (No. [2019]0047).  Data  Availability  Statement:   The  data  presented  in  this  study  are  available  on  request  from  thecorresponding author.  Conflicts of Interest: All authors have no conflicts of interest.  References  1. Wang,  T.;  Huang,  H.;  Zhang,  Y.;  Li,  X.;  Li,  H.;  Jiang,  Q.;  Gao,  W.  Role  of  effective  composition  on  antioxidant,  an‐ ti‐inflammatory,  sedative‐hypnotic  capacities  of  6  common  edible  Lilium  varieties.  J.  Food  Sci.  2015,  80,  H857–H868,  doi:10.1111/1750‐3841.12787.  2. Chinese Pharmacopoeia Commission. Pharmacopoeia of the People Republic of China; Chinese Medical Science and Technology  Press: Beijing, China, 2020; pp. 132–133.  3. Hou, Y.; Jiang, J.G. Origin and concept of medicine food homology and its application in modern functional foods. Food Funct.  2013, 4, 1727–1741, doi:10.1039/c3fo60295h.  4. Ma, T.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, Y.M.; Luo, J.G.; Kong, L.Y. Bioassay‐guided isolation of anti‐inflammatory components from the  bulbs of Lilium brownii var. viridulum and identifying the underlying mechanism through acting on the NF‐kappaB/MAPKs  Pathway. Molecules 2017, 22, 506, doi:10.3390/molecules22040506.  5. Hong, X.X.; Luo, J.G.; Guo, C.; Kong, L.Y. New steroidal saponins from the bulbs of Lilium brownii var. viridulum. Carbohyd. Res.  2012, 361, 19–26, doi:10.1016/j.carres.2012.07.027.  6. Pan, G.; Xie, Z.; Huang, S.; Tai, Y.; Cai, Q.; Jiang, W.; Sun, J.; Yuan, Y. Immune‐enhancing effects of polysaccharides extracted  from Lilium lancifolium Thunb. Int. Immunopharmacol. 2017, 52, 119–126, doi:10.1016/j.intimp.2017.08.030.  7. Munafo, J.P., Jr.; Gianfagna, T.J. Quantitative analysis of phenylpropanoid glycerol glucosides in different organs of Easter Lily  (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.). J. Agric. Food Chem. 2015, 63, 4836–4842, doi:10.1021/acs.jafc.5b00893.  8. Yuan, Z.Y.; Li, Z.Y.; Zhao, H.Q.; Gao, C.; Xiao, M.W.; Jiang, X.M.; Zhu, J.P.; Huang, H.Y.; Xu, G.M.; Xie, M.Z. Effects of different  drying methods on the chemical constituents of Lilium lancifolium Thunb. based on UHPLC‐MS analysis and antidepressant  activity of the main chemical component regaloside A. J. Sep. Sci. 2020, doi:10.1002/jssc.202000969.  9. Azadi, P.; Khosh‐Khui, M. Micropropagation of Lilium ledebourii (Baker) Boiss as affected by plant growth regulator, sucrose  concentration,  harvesting  season  and  cold  treatments.  Electron.  J.  Biotechnol.  2007,  10,  582–591,  doi:10.2225/vol10‐issue4‐fulltext‐7.  10. Aydin, B.; Gulcin, I.; Alwasel, S.H. Purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from Hemsin Apple (Malus com‐ munis L.). Int. J. Food Prop. 2015, 18, 2735–2745, doi:10.1080/10942912.2015.1012725.  11. Segovia‐Bravo, K.A.; Jarén‐Galán, M.; García‐García, P.; Garrido‐Fernández, A. Browning reactions in olives: Mechanism and  polyphenols involved. Food Chem. 2009, 114, 1380–1385, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2008.11.017.  12. Krzyzanowski, A.; Saleeb, M.; Elofsson, M. Synthesis of Indole‐, Benzo[b]thiophene‐, and Benzo[b] selenophene‐Based Ana‐ logues  of  the  Resveratrol  Dimers  Viniferifuran  and  (+/‐)‐Dehydroampelopsin  B.  Org.  Lett.  2018,  20,  6650–6654,  doi:10.1021/acs.orglett.8b02638.  13. Guerrero, R.F.; Biais, B.; Richard, T.; Puertas, B.; Waffo‐Teguo, P.; Merillon, J.M.; Cantos‐Villar, E. Grapevine cane’s waste is a  source of bioactive stilbenes. Ind. Crop. Prod. 2016, 94, 884–892, doi:10.1016/j.indcrop.2016.09.055.  14. Tsikas, D. Assessment of lipid peroxidation by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) and relatives in biological samples: Ana‐ lytical and biological challenges. Anal. Biochem. 2017, 524, 13–30, doi:10.1016/j.ab.2016.10.021.  15. Saura, D.; Vegara, S.; Marti, N.; Valero, M.; Laencina, J. Non‐enzymatic browning due to storage is reduced by using clarified  lemon  juice  as  acidifier  in  industrial‐scale  production  of  canned  peach  halves.  J.  Food  Sci.  Technol.  2017,  54,  1873–1881,  doi:10.1007/s13197‐017‐2619‐3.  16. Nooshkam, M.; Varidi, M.; Bashash, M. The Maillard reaction products as food‐born antioxidant and antibrowning agents in  model and real food systems. Food Chem. 2019, 275, 644–660, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.09.083.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  17  of  18  17. Cha, J.; Debnath, T.; Lee, K.G. Analysis of alpha‐dicarbonyl compounds and volatiles formed in Maillard reaction model sys‐ tems. Sci. Rep. 2019, 9, 5325, doi:10.1038/s41598‐019‐41824‐8.  18. Farcuh, M.; Copes, B.; Le‐Navenec, G.; Marroquin, J.; Cantu, D.; Bradford, K.J.; Guinard, J.X.; Van Deynze, A. Sensory, physi‐ cochemical and volatile compound analysis of short and long shelf‐life melon (Cucumis melo L.) genotypes at harvest and after  postharvest storage. Food Chem. 2020, 8, 100107, doi:10.1016/j.fochx.2020.100107.  19. Zhu, S.; Feng, L.; Zhang, C.; Bao, Y.; He, Y. Identifying freshness of Spinach leaves stored at different temperatures using hy‐ perspectral imaging. Foods 2019, 8, 356, doi:10.3390/foods8090356.  20. Kan, J.; Xie, W.J.; Wan, B.; Huo, T.B.; Lin, X.P.; Liu, J.; Jin, C.H. Heat‐induced tolerance to browning of fresh‐cut lily bulbs  (Lilium lancifolium Thunb.) under cold storage. J. Food Biochem. 2019, 43, e12816, doi:10.1111/jfbc.12816.  21. Hoch,  W.A.;  Singsaas,  E.L.;  McCown,  B.H.  Resorption  protection.  Anthocyanins  facilitate  nutrient  recovery  in  autumn  by  shielding leaves from potentially damaging light levels. Plant Physiol. 2003, 133, 1296–1305, doi:10.1104/pp.103.027631.  22. Logan, B.A.; Stafstrom, W.C.; Walsh, M.J.L.; Reblin, J.S.; Gould, K.S. Examining the photoprotection hypothesis for adaxial  foliar anthocyanin accumulation by revisiting comparisons of green‐ and red‐leafed varieties of coleus (Solenostemon scutellari‐ oides). Photosynth. Res. 2015, 124, 267–274, doi:10.1007/s11120‐015‐0130‐0.  23. Cho, J.S.; Moon, K.D. Comparison of image analysis methods to evaluate the degree of browning of fresh‐cut lettuce. Food Sci.  Biotechnol. 2014, 23, 1043–1048, doi:10.1007/s10068‐014‐0142‐0.  24. Zhang, J.; Gao, Y.; Zhou, X.; Hu, L.; Xie, T. Chemical characterisation of polysaccharides from Lilium davidii. Nat. Prod. Res. 2010,  24, 357–369, doi:10.1080/14786410903182212.  25. Chen, J.; Wu, S.S.; Liang, R.H.; Liu, W.; Liu, C.M.; Shuai, X.X.; Wang, Z.J. The effect of high speed shearing on disaggregation  and degradation of pectin from creeping fig seeds. Food Chem. 2014, 165, 1–8, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.05.096.  26. Chen, X.; Song, W.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Y. Some physical properties of protein moiety of Alkali‐extracted tea polysac‐ charide conjugates were shielded by its polysaccharide. Molecules 2017, 22, 914, doi:10.3390/molecules22060914.  27. National  Institute  of  Measurement  and  Testing  Technology.  Tea‐Determination of Free Amino Acids Content;  AQSIQ:  Beijing,  China, 2014; Volume GB/T 8314‐2013.  28. Jin, L.; Zhang, Y.; Yan, L.; Guo, Y.; Niu, L. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of bulb extracts of six Lilium species  native to China. Molecules 2012, 17, 9361–9378, doi:10.3390/molecules17089361.  29. Siddiq, M.; Dolan, K.D. Characterization of polyphenol oxidase from blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.). Food Chem. 2017,  218, 216–220, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.09.061.  30. Janero, D.R. Malondialdehyde and thiobarbituric acid‐reactivity as diagnostic indices of lipid peroxidation and peroxidative  tissue injury. Free Radic. Biol. Med. 1990, 9, 515–540, doi:10.1016/0891‐5849(90)90131‐2.  31. Zhao, K.H.; Zhou, F.; Yan, S.E.; Liu, D.B.; Xie, H.Q. The analysis of compounds from Longya Lilium via HPLC‐Q‐TOF‐MS and  HS‐SPME‐GC‐MS. Nat. Prod. Res. Dev. 2020, 32, 1331–1342, doi:10.16333/j.1001‐6880.2020.8.008.  32. Narbona, E.; Jaca, J.; del Valle, J.C.; Valladares, F.; Buide, M.L. Whole‐plant reddening in Silene germana is due to anthocyanin  accumulation in response to visible light. Plant Biol. 2018, 20, 968–977, doi:10.1111/plb.12875.  33. Khan, N.; Ali, S.; Zandi, P.; Mehmood, A.; Ullah, S.; Ikram, M.; Ismail; Shahid, M.A.; Babar, A. Role of Sugars, Amino acids and  organic acids in improving plant abiotic stress tolerance. Pak. J. Bot. 2020, 52, 355–363, doi:10.30848/Pjb2020‐2(24).  34. Sun, Y.J.; Shi, Z.D.; Jiang, Y.P.; Zhang, X.H.; Li, X.A.; Li, F.J. Effects of preharvest regulation of ethylene on carbohydrate me‐ tabolism of apple (Malus domestica Borkh cv. Starkrimson) fruit at harvest and during storage. Sci. Hortic. 2021, 276, 109748,  doi:10.1016/j.scienta.2020.109748.  35. Saddhe, A.A.; Manuka, R.; Penna, S. Plant sugars: Homeostasis and transport under abiotic stress in plants. Physiol. Plant. 2020,  doi:10.1111/ppl.13283.  36. Das,  B.;  Sahoo,  R.N.;  Pargal,  S.;  Krishna,  G.;  Verma,  R.;  Chinnusamy,  V.;  Sehgal,  V.K.;  Gupta,  V.K.;  Dash,  S.K.;  Swain,  P.  Quantitative monitoring of sucrose, reducing sugar and total sugar dynamics for phenotyping of water‐deficit stress tolerance  in  rice  through  spectroscopy  and  chemometrics.  Spectrochim.  Acta  A  Mol.  Biomol.  Spectrosc.  2018,  192,  41–51,  doi:10.1016/j.saa.2017.10.076.  37. Furtauer, L.; Weiszmann, J.; Weckwerth, W.; Nagele, T. Dynamics of plant metabolism during cold acclimation. Int. J. Mol. Sci.  2019, 20, 5411, doi:10.3390/ijms20215411.  38. Huang, Y.H.; Picha, D.H.; Kilili, A.W.; Johnson, C.E. Changes in invertase activities and reducing sugar content in sweetpotato  stored at different temperatures. J. Agric. Food Chem. 1999, 47, 4927–4931, doi:10.1021/jf9902191.  39. Hierl, G.; Vothknecht, U.; Gietl, C. Programmed cell death in Ricinus and Arabidopsis: The function of KDEL cysteine pepti‐ dases in development. Physiol. Plant. 2012, 145, 103–113, doi:10.1111/j.1399‐3054.2012.01580.x.  40. Chodankar,  S.; Aswal, V.K.; Kohlbrecher, J.;  Vavrin,  R.; Wagh, A.G.  Small‐angle  neutron scattering study  of structure  and  kinetics of temperature‐induced protein gelation. Phys. Rev. E 2009, 79, 021912, doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.79.021912.  41. Goldford, J.E.; Hartman, H.; Marsland, R.; Segre, D. Environmental boundary conditions for the origin of life converge to an  organo‐sulfur metabolism. Nat. Ecol. Evol. 2019, 3, 1715–1724, doi:10.1038/s41559‐019‐1018‐8.  42. Park, J.E.; Kim, J.; Purevdorj, E.; Son, Y.J.; Nho, C.W.; Yoo, G. Effects of long light exposure and drought stress on plant growth  and  glucosinolate  production  in  pak  choi  (Brassica  rapa  subsp.  chinensis).  Food  Chem.  2021,  340,  128167,  doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2020.128167.  43. Di Gioia, M.L.; Leggio, A.; Malagrino, F.; Romio, E.; Siciliano, C.; Liguori, A. N‐methylated α‐amino acids and peptides: Syn‐ thesis and biological activity. Mini. Rev. Med. Chem. 2016, 16, 683–690, doi:10.2174/1389557516666160322152457.    Agriculture 2021, 11, 184  18  of  18  44. Yu, H.; Seow, Y.X.; Ong, P.K.C.; Zhou, W. Kinetic study of high‐intensity ultrasound‐assisted Maillard reaction in a model  system of d‐glucose and glycine. Food Chem. 2018, 269, 628–637, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.07.053.  45. Quan, W.; Wu, Z.L.; Jiao, Y.; Liu, G.P.; Wang, Z.J.; He, Z.Y.; Tao, G.J.; Qin, F.; Zeng, M.M.; Chen, J. Exploring the relationship  between potato components and Maillard reaction derivative harmful products using multivariate statistical analysis.  Food  Chem. 2021, 339, 127853, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2020.127853.  46. Aubert, C.; Chalot, G.; Lurol, S.; Ronjon, A.; Cottet, V. Relationship between fruit density and quality parameters, levels of  sugars, organic acids, bioactive compounds and volatiles of two nectarine cultivars, at harvest and after ripening. Food Chem.  2019, 297, 124954, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2019.124954.  47. Shi, L.Y.; Cao, S.F.; Shao, J.R.; Chen, W.; Yang, Z.F.; Zheng, Y.H. Chinese bayberry fruit treated with blue light after harvest  genes.  Postharvest  Biol.  Technol.  2016,  111,  197–204,  exhibit  enhanced  sugar  production  and  expression  of  cryptochrome  doi:10.1016/j.postharvbio.2015.08.013.  48. Yonny, M.E.; Torressi, A.R.; Nazareno, M.A.; Cerutti, S. Development of a novel, sensitive, selective, and fast methodology to  determine malondialdehyde in leaves of melon plants by ultra‐high‐performance liquid chromatography‐tandem mass spec‐ trometry. J. Anal. Methods Chem. 2017, 2017, 4327954, doi:10.1155/2017/4327954.  49. Yan, S.L.; Yang, T.B.; Luo, Y.G. The mechanism of ethanol treatment on inhibiting lettuce enzymatic browning and microbial  growth. LWT‐Food Sci. Technol. 2015, 63, 383–390, doi:10.1016/j.lwt.2015.03.004.  50. Brillante, L.; De Rosso, M.; Dalla Vedova, A.; Maoz, I.; Flamini, R.; Tomasi, D. Insights on the stilbenes in Raboso Piave grape  (Vitis  vinifera  L.)  as  a  consequence  of  postharvest  vs  on‐vine  dehydration.  J.  Sci.  Food  Agric.  2018,  98,  1961–1967,  doi:10.1002/jsfa.8679.  51. Alfeo, V.; Bravi, E.; Ceccaroni, D.; Sileoni, V.; Perretti, G.; Marconi, O. Effect of baking time and temperature on nutrients and  phenolic compounds content of fresh sprouts breadlike product. Foods 2020, 9, 1447, doi:10.3390/foods9101447.  52. Suleman, P.; Redha, A.; Afzal, M.; Al‐Hasan, R. Temperature‐induced changes of malondialdehyde, heat‐shock proteins in  relation to chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis in Conocarpus lancifolius (Engl.). Acta Physiol. Plant. 2013, 35, 1223–1231,  doi:10.1007/s11738‐012‐1161‐1.  53. Zhang, Z.Y.; Jin, H.B.; Suo, J.W.; Yu, W.Y.; Zhou, M.Y.; Dai, W.S.; Song, L.L.; Hu, Y.Y.; Wu, J.S. Effect of temperature and hu‐ midity on oil quality of harvested Torreya grandis cv. Merrillii nuts during the after‐ripening stage. Front. Plant. Sci. 2020, 11,  573681, doi:10.3389/fpls.2020.573681.  54. Peng, X.Y.; Du, C.; Yu, H.Y.; Zhao, X.Y.; Zhang, X.Y.; Wang, X.Y. Purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase (PPO)  from water yam (Dioscorea alata). CyTA J. Food 2019, 17, 676–684, doi:10.1080/19476337.2019.1634645.  55. Zhang, J.H.; Li, C.Y.; Wei, M.L.; Ge, Y.H.; Tang, Q.; Xue, W.J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Wang, W.H.; Lv, J.Y. Effects of trisodium phosphate  treatment  after  harvest  on  storage  quality  and  sucrose  metabolism  in  jujube  fruit.  J.  Sci.  Food  Agric.  2019,  99,  5526–5532,  doi:10.1002/jsfa.9814.  56. Balasooriya,  H.N.;  Dassanayake,  K.B.;  Seneweera,  S.;  Ajlouni,  S.  Impact  of  elevated  carbon  dioxide  and  temperature  on  strawberry polyphenols. J. Sci. Food Agric. 2019, 99, 4659–4669, doi:10.1002/jsfa.9706.  57. Simsek, M.; Quezada‐Calvillo, R.; Nichols, B.L.; Hamaker, B.R. Phenolic compounds increase the transcription of mouse intes‐ tinal maltase‐glucoamylase and sucrase‐isomaltase. Food Funct. 2017, 8, 1915–1924, doi:10.1039/c7fo00015d.  58. Mo, E.J.; Ahn, J.H.; Jo, Y.H.; Kim, S.B.; Hwang, B.Y.; Lee, M.K. Inositol derivatives and phenolic compounds from the roots of  Taraxacum coreanum. Molecules 2017, 22, 1349, doi:10.3390/molecules22081349.  59. Luo, J.; Li, L.; Kong, L. Preparative separation of phenylpropenoid glycerides from the bulbs of Lilium lancifolium by high‐speed  counter‐current  chromatography  and  evaluation  of  their  antioxidant  activities.  Food  Chem.  2012,  131,  1056–1062,  doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2011.09.112.  60. Yin, L.B.; Liao, C.; Yang, A.L.; Liu, D.; He, P.; Liu, Y.L.; Li, L.L. Effect of the controlled atmosphere storage on the quality of  Lilium brownii bulbs. Int. J. Agric. Biol. 2020, 24, 1607–1613, doi:10.17957/Ijab/15.1601.  61. Li, X.D.; Wu, B.H.; Wang, L.J.; Zheng, X.B.; Yan, S.T.; Li, S.H. Changes in trans‐resveratrol and other phenolic compounds in  grape  skin  and  seeds  under  low  temperature  storage  after  post‐harvest  UV‐irradiation.  J.  Hortic.  Sci.  Biotechnol.  2009,  84,  113–118, doi:10.1080/14620316.2009.11512490.  62. Billet, K.; Houille, B.; Besseau, S.; Melin, C.; Oudin, A.; Papon, N.; Courdavault, V.; Clastre, M.; Giglioli‐Guivarc’h, N.; Lanoue,  A. Mechanical stress rapidly induces E‐resveratrol and E‐piceatannol biosynthesis in grape canes stored as a freshly‐pruned  byproduct. Food Chem. 2018, 240, 1022–1027, doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.07.105. 

Journal

AgricultureMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Feb 23, 2021

There are no references for this article.