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A Common-Source Outbreak of Staphylococcus epidermidis Infections among Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

A Common-Source Outbreak of Staphylococcus epidermidis Infections among Patients Undergoing... A single strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis caused an outbreak of postoperative wound infections and endocarditis during a 6-month period. Infections caused by the epidemic strain developed more frequently in valve surgery patients than in those undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery (P = .03) and occurred only in patients operated on by surgeon A. None of 17 members of the cardiac surgery team carried the epidemic strain in their anterior nares, axillae, or inguinal folds. Hand cultures were performed on 8 surgical personnel, and only surgeon A carried the epidemic strain on his hands. Isolates from cardiac surgery patients, bypass pump blood cultures, and the hands of the implicated surgeon all had identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, plasmid profiles, and EcoR1 restriction endonuclease digest patterns. In the 24 months after control measures were implemented, no infections caused by the epidemic strain occurred among open heart surgery patients. The findings suggest that the common-source outbreak of infections among cardiac surgery patients was due to carriage of a strain S. epidermidis on the hands of a cardiac surgeon. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Infectious Diseases Oxford University Press

A Common-Source Outbreak of Staphylococcus epidermidis Infections among Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0022-1899
eISSN
1537-6613
DOI
10.1093/infdis/161.3.493
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A single strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis caused an outbreak of postoperative wound infections and endocarditis during a 6-month period. Infections caused by the epidemic strain developed more frequently in valve surgery patients than in those undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery (P = .03) and occurred only in patients operated on by surgeon A. None of 17 members of the cardiac surgery team carried the epidemic strain in their anterior nares, axillae, or inguinal folds. Hand cultures were performed on 8 surgical personnel, and only surgeon A carried the epidemic strain on his hands. Isolates from cardiac surgery patients, bypass pump blood cultures, and the hands of the implicated surgeon all had identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, plasmid profiles, and EcoR1 restriction endonuclease digest patterns. In the 24 months after control measures were implemented, no infections caused by the epidemic strain occurred among open heart surgery patients. The findings suggest that the common-source outbreak of infections among cardiac surgery patients was due to carriage of a strain S. epidermidis on the hands of a cardiac surgeon.

Journal

The Journal of Infectious DiseasesOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1990

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