Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Place for Stories: Nature, History, and Narrative

A Place for Stories: Nature, History, and Narrative This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes I would like to thank the many friends and colleagues who have read and criticized various versions of this essay. David Laurence was responsible for convincing me, rather against my will, that the perspective I've adopted here could be neither ignored nor evaded, and he offered generous guidance as I tried to acquire the critical vocabulary that would allow me to tackle these problems. As always, David Scobey has been my most faithful guide in helping me find my way through the dense thickets of literary theory. Comments and suggestions from Thomas Bender, Elise Broach, Robert Burt, Michael P. Cohen, James Davidson, David Brion Davis, Kai Erikson, Ann Fabian, Peter Gay, Amy Green, Michael Goldberg, Ramachandra Guha, Reeve Huston, Susan Johnson, Howard Lamar, Jonathan Lear, Patricia Limerick, Arch McCallum, George Miles, Katherine Morrissey, Jim O'Brien, Robert Shulman, Thompson Smith, Alan Taylor, Paul Taylor, Sylvia Tesh, Thompson Webb III, Timothy Weiskel, Richard White, Bryan Wolf, Donald Worster, and two anonymous readers likewise helped shape my thoughts on this subject. Finally, I owe a special debt to David Thelen and Steven Stowe for their persistence in encouraging me to return to an essay I had all but abandoned. I am grateful to all. Copyright Organization of American Historians, 1992 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of American History Oxford University Press

A Place for Stories: Nature, History, and Narrative

The Journal of American History , Volume 78 (4) – Mar 1, 1992

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/a-place-for-stories-nature-history-and-narrative-pmOKGcPd0R

References (10)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright Organization of American Historians, 1992
ISSN
0021-8723
eISSN
1945-2314
DOI
10.2307/2079346
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes I would like to thank the many friends and colleagues who have read and criticized various versions of this essay. David Laurence was responsible for convincing me, rather against my will, that the perspective I've adopted here could be neither ignored nor evaded, and he offered generous guidance as I tried to acquire the critical vocabulary that would allow me to tackle these problems. As always, David Scobey has been my most faithful guide in helping me find my way through the dense thickets of literary theory. Comments and suggestions from Thomas Bender, Elise Broach, Robert Burt, Michael P. Cohen, James Davidson, David Brion Davis, Kai Erikson, Ann Fabian, Peter Gay, Amy Green, Michael Goldberg, Ramachandra Guha, Reeve Huston, Susan Johnson, Howard Lamar, Jonathan Lear, Patricia Limerick, Arch McCallum, George Miles, Katherine Morrissey, Jim O'Brien, Robert Shulman, Thompson Smith, Alan Taylor, Paul Taylor, Sylvia Tesh, Thompson Webb III, Timothy Weiskel, Richard White, Bryan Wolf, Donald Worster, and two anonymous readers likewise helped shape my thoughts on this subject. Finally, I owe a special debt to David Thelen and Steven Stowe for their persistence in encouraging me to return to an essay I had all but abandoned. I am grateful to all. Copyright Organization of American Historians, 1992

Journal

The Journal of American HistoryOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1992

There are no references for this article.