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Association between various sedentary behaviours and all-cause, cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality: the Multiethnic Cohort Study

Association between various sedentary behaviours and all-cause, cardiovascular disease and cancer... Background It has been proposed that time spent sitting increases all-cause mortality, but evidence to support this hypothesis, especially the relative effects of various sitting activities alone or in combination, is very limited.Methods The association between various sedentary behaviours (time spent: sitting watching television (TV); in other leisure activities; in a car/bus; at work; and at meals) and mortality (all-cause and cause-specific) was examined in the Multiethnic Cohort Study, which included 61 395 men and 73 201 women aged 4575 years among five racial/ethnic groups (African American, Latino, Japanese American, Native Hawaiian and White) from Hawaii and Los Angeles, USA.Results Median follow-up was 13.7 years and 19 143 deaths were recorded. Total daily sitting was not associated with mortality in men, whereas in women the longest sitting duration (10 h/day vs <5 h/day) was associated with increased all-cause (11) and cardiovascular (19) mortality. Multivariate hazard ratios (HR) for 5 h/day vs <1 h/day of sitting watching TV were 1.19 in men (95 confidence interval (CI) 1.101.29) and 1.32 in women (95 CI 1.211.44) for all-cause mortality. This association was consistent across four racial/ethnic groups, but was not seen in Japanese Americans. Sitting watching TV was associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, but not for cancer mortality. Time spent sitting in a car/bus and at work was not related to mortality.Conclusions Leisure time spent sitting, particularly watching television, may increase overall and cardiovascular mortality. Sitting at work or during transportation was not related to mortality. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Epidemiology Oxford University Press

Association between various sedentary behaviours and all-cause, cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality: the Multiethnic Cohort Study

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References (50)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association The Author 2013; all rights reserved.
ISSN
0300-5771
eISSN
1464-3685
DOI
10.1093/ije/dyt108
pmid
24062293
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background It has been proposed that time spent sitting increases all-cause mortality, but evidence to support this hypothesis, especially the relative effects of various sitting activities alone or in combination, is very limited.Methods The association between various sedentary behaviours (time spent: sitting watching television (TV); in other leisure activities; in a car/bus; at work; and at meals) and mortality (all-cause and cause-specific) was examined in the Multiethnic Cohort Study, which included 61 395 men and 73 201 women aged 4575 years among five racial/ethnic groups (African American, Latino, Japanese American, Native Hawaiian and White) from Hawaii and Los Angeles, USA.Results Median follow-up was 13.7 years and 19 143 deaths were recorded. Total daily sitting was not associated with mortality in men, whereas in women the longest sitting duration (10 h/day vs <5 h/day) was associated with increased all-cause (11) and cardiovascular (19) mortality. Multivariate hazard ratios (HR) for 5 h/day vs <1 h/day of sitting watching TV were 1.19 in men (95 confidence interval (CI) 1.101.29) and 1.32 in women (95 CI 1.211.44) for all-cause mortality. This association was consistent across four racial/ethnic groups, but was not seen in Japanese Americans. Sitting watching TV was associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, but not for cancer mortality. Time spent sitting in a car/bus and at work was not related to mortality.Conclusions Leisure time spent sitting, particularly watching television, may increase overall and cardiovascular mortality. Sitting at work or during transportation was not related to mortality.

Journal

International Journal of EpidemiologyOxford University Press

Published: Aug 30, 2013

Keywords: Sedentary lifestyle mortality television exercise prospective studies

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