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Biogeography, an Ecological Perspective

Biogeography, an Ecological Perspective Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/7/5/53/116129 by DeepDyve user on 06 November 2020 Dictionary of l\licrohiology. MORRIS tion to organized structure and function. of biology. The last chapter on Man's The result is a stimulating series of short JACOBS, MAURICE GERSTEIN and Impact on the Landscape will help sum­ essays, and although the author states that \VILLIAM WALTER. 276 pgs. D. Van marize human interference with nature for Nostrand and Co., Inc., Princeton, New his book is nothing more than a "guess" many students. John H. Davis, University about bioenergetics, it is an educated, Jersey. (1957) $6.75 of Florida. This volume is an attempt to compile in organized and integrated guess, fascinating Canadian Cancer Conference II. R. W. even to one who is not a biochemist. C. P. one text what one can still find better de­ BEGG. 398 pgs., illus. Academic Press Swanson, Johns Hopkins University. fined in Bergey's Manual and a good medi­ Inc., III Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. cal dictionary. The claim that this diction­ (1957) $8.50 Neuropharmacology. Transactions' of ary offers clear and explicit definitions is This is the publication of the proceed­ the Third Conference. HAROLD A. certainly open to question. The volume is ings of the Second Canadian Cancer Re­ ABRAMSON. 381 pgs., illus. Josiah clumsy to use-e.g. turning to Moeller's search Conference held at Honey Harbour, Macy, Jr. Foundation, New York, N. Y. method for staining, the reader is advised Ontario, June 17-21, 1956. The volume ( 1957) $4.50 to see spore stain. Finding spore stain, contains 22 papers presented at the con­ This book shares the informal multi­ the reader is referred to malachite green ference and grouped under the four gen­ discipline approach and process of the con­ solution, Dormer's method and Wirtz's eral subjects: (1) the cell, (2) leukemia ference with readers. It contains ten brief method. Turning to each of these refer­ and chemotherapy, (3) hormones and can­ presentations by different speakers high­ ences, one finds no mention of Moeller. cer, (4) immunity and basic mechanisms. ligh ting some of the interesting aspects I. C. Mohler, AIBS. The papers vary from T. S. Hauschka's of each speaker's research. As expected, very thorough presentation to tissue each presentation is interrupted and fol­ *Biogeography, an Ecological Perspec­ genetics of neoplastic cell populations, a lowed by comments, questions, criticisms tive. PIERRE DANSEREAU. 369 pgs .. paper with 250 references, to K. J. R. illus. Ronald Press, 15 East 26th St., and "group interchange", with participa­ Wightman's interesting discussion of a tion in the penetrating discussions by the N. Y. (1957) $7.50 clinician's concept of leukemia, with no 19 members and 11 guests of the distin­ With his wide experience of travel and references; and from A. Lacassagne's paper guished conference. The principal topics extensive familiarity with ecological and on glandular cancers of hormonal origin, discussed are the effects of LSD- 25 on biogeographical literature in many lan­ a subject that has been under investiga­ snails, the blocking of the LSD- 25 reaction guages, Dansereau has been able to inte­ tion for over 50 years, to M. L. Barr and in Siamese Fighting Fish, production and grate all levels that compose the broad L. K. Moore's discussion of sex determina­ control of alcoholic cravings in rats, the scope of biogeography into one concise tion of somatic and tumor cells by the sex action of alcohol on the central nervous volume. In a clear, synthetic approach he chromatin, a field of investigation limited system, stress situations in animals and has made a "comprehensive ensemble" to the last four years. Some of the more the nature of conflict, the measurement of of diverse studies of "the origin, distribu­ refreshing papers are by several of the subjective responses, the. effects of psycho­ tion, adaptation, and association of plants Canadian investigators who are relative somimetic drugs in animals and man, the and animals." By numerous, instructive newcomers in cancer research. Some of origin of cortical surface potentials, sero­ diagrams, maps and tables he presents the facts and ideas of the authors who have tonin and norepinephrine as antagonistic many salient features of bioclimatology, been in the field longer, although excellent, chemical mediators regulating the central life-forms of plants and vegetation, and have already been published many times. autonomic nervous system, and brain re­ biotic relations. The Ronald Press has The book is very well edited, and the print­ sponse to drugs mapped through self­ done an outstanding printing job on good ing, the quality of the paper, and the repro­ stimulation. This book gathers andinte­ paper. Many other biologists, as well as duction of the photographs are good. W. grates much information which is otherwise and biogeographers, will wel­ ecologists E. Heston, National Cancer Institute, unpublished or widely scattered in the come this book for the collation of numer­ National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, literature. G. W. Casarett, University of ous new approaches that have been dif­ Md. Rochester, School of Medicine. fused through the literature. Dansereau expands the old ideas of life forms of Raun­ Mitochondria and Other Cytoplasmic *Soils and Soil Fertility. LOUIS M. kiaer and puts emphasis on the recent con­ Inclusions. Symposia of the Society for THOMPSON. 451 pgs., illus. McGraw­ cepts of ecosystems and environmental Experimental Biology. No. X. 198 pgs., Hill Book Company, 330 W. 42nd St., dimensions divisible into biocycles and bio­ illus. Academic Prses, Inc., III Fifth New York, N. Y. (1957) chores. From the first chapter on the His­ Avenue, New York, N. Y. (1957) $9.50 This second edition represents a nicely tory of Biota through Bioclimatology, Of the eleven papers assembled in this modernized and expanded version of the Synecology and Autecology, the discussions small but comprehensive volume, there is first. The book is surprisingly compre­ and illustrations bring the reader up to date an almost even distribution between those hensive and the author has done an excel­ and even project him 'into the future with devoted primarily to the morphological, lent job of presenting recent research find­ exciting and provocative innovations. His to the biochemical and to those essaying ings and new concepts. The treatment and consistent view of envirnomental relations an integrated approach to these aspects of coverage are entirely adequate for an in­ reflected into the forms of the organisms cell organelles. Most of the observations troductory course in soil science at college and particularly the structure of vegetation reported deal with cytoplasmic compo­ level. In addition, the book merits scan­ is a salient feature. He presents clearly the nents of various vertebrate tissues, although ning, or selective reading for refresher dynamics of vegetational change during such diverse systems as snail amebocytes, purposes, by soil scientists. Worthy of succession. plant roots, insects (neurones, sarcocomes special mention are the chapters on Soil In fact, Dansereau suggests more en­ and spermatocytes) and several species of Formation and Classification, on Clay vironmental and inter-organism relations protozoa are represented. The Symposium Minerals, Acidity and Alkalinity and on than he explains .and he formulates many was opened with a review of the "Golgi Nitrogen. In general; there are relatively criteria and laws that he does not amplify Controversy", and considering the vigor few errors. Occasionally, unwieldy sen­ sufficiently for some readers. His stress of the divergent attitudes on the subject, tence construction and gaps in the devel­ on phytosynecology will please plant it is regrettable that the discussions are opment of information are evident. Also, geographers but the small material on not included, and also that the titles of much of the reference material antedates animal ecology will disappoint some cited literature are not listed in the bibli­ zoogeographers. 1950 but most chapters include discussions ographies. Behaviour of mitochondria, ob­ of pertinent later research. Format, print­ As a text the book can be used at the served by phase contract and interference ing and binding are good. Davis M. Bat­ senior and graduate levels, especially with microscopy, suggests possible relationships students that need an amplification of son, 9768 Damuth Drive, Baton Rouge, to concomitant phenomena in the living La. ecology and new ideas about many phases cell. The organization of mitochondrial A·I·B·S BULLETIN-Novelnber 1957 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

Biogeography, an Ecological Perspective

BioScience , Volume 7 (5) – Nov 1, 1957

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1957 by the American Institute of Biological Sciences
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
DOI
10.2307/1292474
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/7/5/53/116129 by DeepDyve user on 06 November 2020 Dictionary of l\licrohiology. MORRIS tion to organized structure and function. of biology. The last chapter on Man's The result is a stimulating series of short JACOBS, MAURICE GERSTEIN and Impact on the Landscape will help sum­ essays, and although the author states that \VILLIAM WALTER. 276 pgs. D. Van marize human interference with nature for Nostrand and Co., Inc., Princeton, New his book is nothing more than a "guess" many students. John H. Davis, University about bioenergetics, it is an educated, Jersey. (1957) $6.75 of Florida. This volume is an attempt to compile in organized and integrated guess, fascinating Canadian Cancer Conference II. R. W. even to one who is not a biochemist. C. P. one text what one can still find better de­ BEGG. 398 pgs., illus. Academic Press Swanson, Johns Hopkins University. fined in Bergey's Manual and a good medi­ Inc., III Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. cal dictionary. The claim that this diction­ (1957) $8.50 Neuropharmacology. Transactions' of ary offers clear and explicit definitions is This is the publication of the proceed­ the Third Conference. HAROLD A. certainly open to question. The volume is ings of the Second Canadian Cancer Re­ ABRAMSON. 381 pgs., illus. Josiah clumsy to use-e.g. turning to Moeller's search Conference held at Honey Harbour, Macy, Jr. Foundation, New York, N. Y. method for staining, the reader is advised Ontario, June 17-21, 1956. The volume ( 1957) $4.50 to see spore stain. Finding spore stain, contains 22 papers presented at the con­ This book shares the informal multi­ the reader is referred to malachite green ference and grouped under the four gen­ discipline approach and process of the con­ solution, Dormer's method and Wirtz's eral subjects: (1) the cell, (2) leukemia ference with readers. It contains ten brief method. Turning to each of these refer­ and chemotherapy, (3) hormones and can­ presentations by different speakers high­ ences, one finds no mention of Moeller. cer, (4) immunity and basic mechanisms. ligh ting some of the interesting aspects I. C. Mohler, AIBS. The papers vary from T. S. Hauschka's of each speaker's research. As expected, very thorough presentation to tissue each presentation is interrupted and fol­ *Biogeography, an Ecological Perspec­ genetics of neoplastic cell populations, a lowed by comments, questions, criticisms tive. PIERRE DANSEREAU. 369 pgs .. paper with 250 references, to K. J. R. illus. Ronald Press, 15 East 26th St., and "group interchange", with participa­ Wightman's interesting discussion of a tion in the penetrating discussions by the N. Y. (1957) $7.50 clinician's concept of leukemia, with no 19 members and 11 guests of the distin­ With his wide experience of travel and references; and from A. Lacassagne's paper guished conference. The principal topics extensive familiarity with ecological and on glandular cancers of hormonal origin, discussed are the effects of LSD- 25 on biogeographical literature in many lan­ a subject that has been under investiga­ snails, the blocking of the LSD- 25 reaction guages, Dansereau has been able to inte­ tion for over 50 years, to M. L. Barr and in Siamese Fighting Fish, production and grate all levels that compose the broad L. K. Moore's discussion of sex determina­ control of alcoholic cravings in rats, the scope of biogeography into one concise tion of somatic and tumor cells by the sex action of alcohol on the central nervous volume. In a clear, synthetic approach he chromatin, a field of investigation limited system, stress situations in animals and has made a "comprehensive ensemble" to the last four years. Some of the more the nature of conflict, the measurement of of diverse studies of "the origin, distribu­ refreshing papers are by several of the subjective responses, the. effects of psycho­ tion, adaptation, and association of plants Canadian investigators who are relative somimetic drugs in animals and man, the and animals." By numerous, instructive newcomers in cancer research. Some of origin of cortical surface potentials, sero­ diagrams, maps and tables he presents the facts and ideas of the authors who have tonin and norepinephrine as antagonistic many salient features of bioclimatology, been in the field longer, although excellent, chemical mediators regulating the central life-forms of plants and vegetation, and have already been published many times. autonomic nervous system, and brain re­ biotic relations. The Ronald Press has The book is very well edited, and the print­ sponse to drugs mapped through self­ done an outstanding printing job on good ing, the quality of the paper, and the repro­ stimulation. This book gathers andinte­ paper. Many other biologists, as well as duction of the photographs are good. W. grates much information which is otherwise and biogeographers, will wel­ ecologists E. Heston, National Cancer Institute, unpublished or widely scattered in the come this book for the collation of numer­ National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, literature. G. W. Casarett, University of ous new approaches that have been dif­ Md. Rochester, School of Medicine. fused through the literature. Dansereau expands the old ideas of life forms of Raun­ Mitochondria and Other Cytoplasmic *Soils and Soil Fertility. LOUIS M. kiaer and puts emphasis on the recent con­ Inclusions. Symposia of the Society for THOMPSON. 451 pgs., illus. McGraw­ cepts of ecosystems and environmental Experimental Biology. No. X. 198 pgs., Hill Book Company, 330 W. 42nd St., dimensions divisible into biocycles and bio­ illus. Academic Prses, Inc., III Fifth New York, N. Y. (1957) chores. From the first chapter on the His­ Avenue, New York, N. Y. (1957) $9.50 This second edition represents a nicely tory of Biota through Bioclimatology, Of the eleven papers assembled in this modernized and expanded version of the Synecology and Autecology, the discussions small but comprehensive volume, there is first. The book is surprisingly compre­ and illustrations bring the reader up to date an almost even distribution between those hensive and the author has done an excel­ and even project him 'into the future with devoted primarily to the morphological, lent job of presenting recent research find­ exciting and provocative innovations. His to the biochemical and to those essaying ings and new concepts. The treatment and consistent view of envirnomental relations an integrated approach to these aspects of coverage are entirely adequate for an in­ reflected into the forms of the organisms cell organelles. Most of the observations troductory course in soil science at college and particularly the structure of vegetation reported deal with cytoplasmic compo­ level. In addition, the book merits scan­ is a salient feature. He presents clearly the nents of various vertebrate tissues, although ning, or selective reading for refresher dynamics of vegetational change during such diverse systems as snail amebocytes, purposes, by soil scientists. Worthy of succession. plant roots, insects (neurones, sarcocomes special mention are the chapters on Soil In fact, Dansereau suggests more en­ and spermatocytes) and several species of Formation and Classification, on Clay vironmental and inter-organism relations protozoa are represented. The Symposium Minerals, Acidity and Alkalinity and on than he explains .and he formulates many was opened with a review of the "Golgi Nitrogen. In general; there are relatively criteria and laws that he does not amplify Controversy", and considering the vigor few errors. Occasionally, unwieldy sen­ sufficiently for some readers. His stress of the divergent attitudes on the subject, tence construction and gaps in the devel­ on phytosynecology will please plant it is regrettable that the discussions are opment of information are evident. Also, geographers but the small material on not included, and also that the titles of much of the reference material antedates animal ecology will disappoint some cited literature are not listed in the bibli­ zoogeographers. 1950 but most chapters include discussions ographies. Behaviour of mitochondria, ob­ of pertinent later research. Format, print­ As a text the book can be used at the served by phase contract and interference ing and binding are good. Davis M. Bat­ senior and graduate levels, especially with microscopy, suggests possible relationships students that need an amplification of son, 9768 Damuth Drive, Baton Rouge, to concomitant phenomena in the living La. ecology and new ideas about many phases cell. The organization of mitochondrial A·I·B·S BULLETIN-Novelnber 1957

Journal

BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Nov 1, 1957

There are no references for this article.