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Cancer Survivorship: The Interface of Aging, Comorbidity, and Quality Care

Cancer Survivorship: The Interface of Aging, Comorbidity, and Quality Care Cancer Survivorship: The Interface of Aging, Comorbidity, and Quality Care Julia H. Rowland , Rosemary Yancik for which latest fi gures are available, only 15 (7%) of the 212 studies examining survivors’ posttreatment outcomes that were Already including more than 10 million individuals, the num- supported National Institutes of Health – wide included samples ber of cancer survivors in the United States will continue to in- of these older adults, whereas 39 (18%) were being conducted crease into the foreseeable future ( 1 , 2 ) . This trend is being driven among survivors 5 or more years posttreatment ( 6 ). The fi rst by early detection, improved treatments, and better supportive wave of the baby boomer generation (persons born 1946 – 1964) care, but also, importantly, by the aging of the U.S. population. turns age 65 in 2011; thus, we must understand and fi nd ways to The number (and percentage) of persons aged 65 years and older reduce the adverse impact of surviving cancer on the health of in the U.S. population is projected to increase from its current older adults. The current study illustrates well why we must con- level of 35 million (12.4%) to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute Oxford University Press

Cancer Survivorship: The Interface of Aging, Comorbidity, and Quality Care

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References (15)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2006. Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0027-8874
eISSN
1460-2105
DOI
10.1093/jnci/djj154
pmid
16622113
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cancer Survivorship: The Interface of Aging, Comorbidity, and Quality Care Julia H. Rowland , Rosemary Yancik for which latest fi gures are available, only 15 (7%) of the 212 studies examining survivors’ posttreatment outcomes that were Already including more than 10 million individuals, the num- supported National Institutes of Health – wide included samples ber of cancer survivors in the United States will continue to in- of these older adults, whereas 39 (18%) were being conducted crease into the foreseeable future ( 1 , 2 ) . This trend is being driven among survivors 5 or more years posttreatment ( 6 ). The fi rst by early detection, improved treatments, and better supportive wave of the baby boomer generation (persons born 1946 – 1964) care, but also, importantly, by the aging of the U.S. population. turns age 65 in 2011; thus, we must understand and fi nd ways to The number (and percentage) of persons aged 65 years and older reduce the adverse impact of surviving cancer on the health of in the U.S. population is projected to increase from its current older adults. The current study illustrates well why we must con- level of 35 million (12.4%) to

Journal

JNCI Journal of the National Cancer InstituteOxford University Press

Published: Apr 19, 2006

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