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Chinese Food Cooking and Lung Cancer in Women Nonsmokers

Chinese Food Cooking and Lung Cancer in Women Nonsmokers Abstract Cigarette smoking cannot fully explain the epidemiologic characteristics of lung cancer in Taiwanese women, who smoke rarely but have lung cancer relatively often. In a previous study, the authors suspected that exposure to fumes from cooking oils was an important risk factor for lung cancer in Taiwanese women nonsmokers in the Republic of China. In a new case-control study conducted in 1993–1996, they further explored the association of oil fumes with lung cancer in women. Two sets of controls were used concurrently. The subjects were 131 nonsmoking incident cases with newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed primary carcinoma of the lung, 252 hospital controls hospitalized for causes unrelated to diseases of smoking, and 262 community controls; all controls were women nonsmokers matched by age and date of interview. Details on cooking conditions and habits were collected, in addition to other epidemiologic data. Lung cancer risk increased with the number of meals per day to about threefold for women who cooked these meals each day. The risk was also greater if women usually waited until fumes were emitted from the cooking oil before they began cooking (adjusted odds ratios = 2.0–2.6) and if they did not use a fume extractor (adjusted odds ratios = 3.2–12.2). These results suggest that a proportion of lung cancer may be attributable to the habit of waiting until the cooking oil has been heated to a high temperature before cooking the food. Am J EpidemioI2000;151:140–7. lung neoplasms, mutagens, oils, risk factors, temperature; women © 2000 by The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Epidemiology Oxford University Press

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References (34)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2000 by The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health
ISSN
0002-9262
eISSN
1476-6256
DOI
10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a010181
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Cigarette smoking cannot fully explain the epidemiologic characteristics of lung cancer in Taiwanese women, who smoke rarely but have lung cancer relatively often. In a previous study, the authors suspected that exposure to fumes from cooking oils was an important risk factor for lung cancer in Taiwanese women nonsmokers in the Republic of China. In a new case-control study conducted in 1993–1996, they further explored the association of oil fumes with lung cancer in women. Two sets of controls were used concurrently. The subjects were 131 nonsmoking incident cases with newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed primary carcinoma of the lung, 252 hospital controls hospitalized for causes unrelated to diseases of smoking, and 262 community controls; all controls were women nonsmokers matched by age and date of interview. Details on cooking conditions and habits were collected, in addition to other epidemiologic data. Lung cancer risk increased with the number of meals per day to about threefold for women who cooked these meals each day. The risk was also greater if women usually waited until fumes were emitted from the cooking oil before they began cooking (adjusted odds ratios = 2.0–2.6) and if they did not use a fume extractor (adjusted odds ratios = 3.2–12.2). These results suggest that a proportion of lung cancer may be attributable to the habit of waiting until the cooking oil has been heated to a high temperature before cooking the food. Am J EpidemioI2000;151:140–7. lung neoplasms, mutagens, oils, risk factors, temperature; women © 2000 by The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health

Journal

American Journal of EpidemiologyOxford University Press

Published: Jan 15, 2000

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