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Disorder-associated mutations lead to functional inactivation of neuroligins

Disorder-associated mutations lead to functional inactivation of neuroligins Autism is a neuro-developmental syndrome that affects 0.1–0.5% of the population. It has been proposed that alterations in neuronal circuitry and/or neuronal signaling are responsible for the behavioral and cognitive aberrations in autism patients. However, the cellular basis of such alterations is unknown. Recently, point mutations in a family of neuronal cell adhesion molecules called neuroligins have been linked to autism-spectrum disorders and mental retardation. We investigated the consequences of these disease-associated mutations on neuroligin function. We demonstrate that the point mutation at arginine 451 and a nonsense mutation at aspartate 396 of neuroligin-3 and -4 (NL3 and NL4), respectively, result in intracellular retention of the mutant proteins. Over-expression of wild-type NL3 and NL4 proteins in hippocampal neurons stimulates the formation of presynaptic terminals, whereas the disease-associated mutations result in a loss of this synaptic function. Our findings suggest that the previously identified mutations in neuroligin genes are likely to be relevant for the neuro-developmental defects in autism-spectrum disorders and mental retardation since they impair the function of a synaptic cell adhesion molecule. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Molecular Genetics Oxford University Press

Disorder-associated mutations lead to functional inactivation of neuroligins

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References (37)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Human Molecular Genetics, Vol. 13, No. 14 © Oxford University Press 2004; all rights reserved
ISSN
0964-6906
eISSN
1460-2083
DOI
10.1093/hmg/ddh158
pmid
15150161
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Autism is a neuro-developmental syndrome that affects 0.1–0.5% of the population. It has been proposed that alterations in neuronal circuitry and/or neuronal signaling are responsible for the behavioral and cognitive aberrations in autism patients. However, the cellular basis of such alterations is unknown. Recently, point mutations in a family of neuronal cell adhesion molecules called neuroligins have been linked to autism-spectrum disorders and mental retardation. We investigated the consequences of these disease-associated mutations on neuroligin function. We demonstrate that the point mutation at arginine 451 and a nonsense mutation at aspartate 396 of neuroligin-3 and -4 (NL3 and NL4), respectively, result in intracellular retention of the mutant proteins. Over-expression of wild-type NL3 and NL4 proteins in hippocampal neurons stimulates the formation of presynaptic terminals, whereas the disease-associated mutations result in a loss of this synaptic function. Our findings suggest that the previously identified mutations in neuroligin genes are likely to be relevant for the neuro-developmental defects in autism-spectrum disorders and mental retardation since they impair the function of a synaptic cell adhesion molecule.

Journal

Human Molecular GeneticsOxford University Press

Published: Jul 15, 2004

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