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Dispersal of skin microorganisms*

Dispersal of skin microorganisms* British Journal of Dermatology (1975) 93, .477 Review Studies on the dispersal of skin microorganisms can be considered under three headings: investiga- tions ofthe skin surface and ofthe mechanism of desquamation; hospital or industry based studies relating to the importance of dispersal; studies aimed at understanding and controlling dispersal. Skin as a source of organisms The average human has a skin area of about 175 m^ divided approximately as follows: legs 18% each, trunk 37%, arms 9% each and head 9%; specialized areas such as the perineum and axillae account for less than 2% of the total skin area. The skin scales which compose the surface are about 30 X 30 X 3-5 |(m and consequently some 10® are needed to complete the skin surface. Females have larger scales on average than do males (Plewig, 1970). A complete layer of cells is lost and replaced on average about every 4 days (Halprin, 1972; Jansen, Hojyo-Tomoko & Kligman, 1974), hence we all disseminate more than 10^ particles of skin every day. Although clearly bathing or showering will remove very many scales by mechanical means, Sciple, Riemensnider & Schleyer (1967) found that natural walking movements released about io* scales per minute. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Dermatology Oxford University Press

Dispersal of skin microorganisms*

British Journal of Dermatology , Volume 93 (4): 9 – Oct 1, 1975

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References (76)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1975 British Association of Dermatologists
ISSN
0007-0963
eISSN
1365-2133
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2133.1975.tb06527.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

British Journal of Dermatology (1975) 93, .477 Review Studies on the dispersal of skin microorganisms can be considered under three headings: investiga- tions ofthe skin surface and ofthe mechanism of desquamation; hospital or industry based studies relating to the importance of dispersal; studies aimed at understanding and controlling dispersal. Skin as a source of organisms The average human has a skin area of about 175 m^ divided approximately as follows: legs 18% each, trunk 37%, arms 9% each and head 9%; specialized areas such as the perineum and axillae account for less than 2% of the total skin area. The skin scales which compose the surface are about 30 X 30 X 3-5 |(m and consequently some 10® are needed to complete the skin surface. Females have larger scales on average than do males (Plewig, 1970). A complete layer of cells is lost and replaced on average about every 4 days (Halprin, 1972; Jansen, Hojyo-Tomoko & Kligman, 1974), hence we all disseminate more than 10^ particles of skin every day. Although clearly bathing or showering will remove very many scales by mechanical means, Sciple, Riemensnider & Schleyer (1967) found that natural walking movements released about io* scales per minute.

Journal

British Journal of DermatologyOxford University Press

Published: Oct 1, 1975

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