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Do the ParentChild Relationship and Parenting Behaviors Differ Between Families With a Child With and Without Chronic Illness? A Meta-Analysis

Do the ParentChild Relationship and Parenting Behaviors Differ Between Families With a Child With... ObjectiveThe present meta-analysis compared the quality of the parentchild relationship as well as parenting behaviors and styles of families with a child with chronic physical illness with families of healthy children or test norms.MethodsEmpirical studies were identified with the help of electronic databases and cross-referencing. Based on 325 included studies, random-effects meta-analysis was performed.ResultsAlthough most effect sizes were small or very small, the parentchild relationship tended to be less positive if a child had a chronic physical illness (g .16 standard deviation units). In addition, lower levels of parental responsiveness (emotional warmth; g .22) as well as higher levels of demandingness (control, monitoring; g .18) and overprotection (g .39) were observed in these families. However, effect sizes were heterogeneous and only significant for a limited number of diseases. There was also some evidence for higher levels of authoritarian (g .24) and neglectful parenting (g .51) as well as lower levels of authoritative parenting compared with families with healthy children (g .13). Effect sizes varied, in part, by length of illness, child age, rater, assessment method, and target of comparison. ConclusionsWe conclude that most families with a child with chronic physical illness adapt well with regard to the parentchild relationship and parenting behaviors/styles. Nonetheless, some families of children with specific diseasessuch as epilepsy, hearing impairment, and asthmamay have difficulties finding appropriate levels of protective behaviors, control, and parental warmth and building positive mutual relationships between parents and children. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Psychology Oxford University Press

Do the ParentChild Relationship and Parenting Behaviors Differ Between Families With a Child With and Without Chronic Illness? A Meta-Analysis

Journal of Pediatric Psychology , Volume 38 (7) – Aug 9, 2013

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References (50)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0146-8693
eISSN
1465-735X
DOI
10.1093/jpepsy/jst020
pmid
23660152
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ObjectiveThe present meta-analysis compared the quality of the parentchild relationship as well as parenting behaviors and styles of families with a child with chronic physical illness with families of healthy children or test norms.MethodsEmpirical studies were identified with the help of electronic databases and cross-referencing. Based on 325 included studies, random-effects meta-analysis was performed.ResultsAlthough most effect sizes were small or very small, the parentchild relationship tended to be less positive if a child had a chronic physical illness (g .16 standard deviation units). In addition, lower levels of parental responsiveness (emotional warmth; g .22) as well as higher levels of demandingness (control, monitoring; g .18) and overprotection (g .39) were observed in these families. However, effect sizes were heterogeneous and only significant for a limited number of diseases. There was also some evidence for higher levels of authoritarian (g .24) and neglectful parenting (g .51) as well as lower levels of authoritative parenting compared with families with healthy children (g .13). Effect sizes varied, in part, by length of illness, child age, rater, assessment method, and target of comparison. ConclusionsWe conclude that most families with a child with chronic physical illness adapt well with regard to the parentchild relationship and parenting behaviors/styles. Nonetheless, some families of children with specific diseasessuch as epilepsy, hearing impairment, and asthmamay have difficulties finding appropriate levels of protective behaviors, control, and parental warmth and building positive mutual relationships between parents and children.

Journal

Journal of Pediatric PsychologyOxford University Press

Published: Aug 9, 2013

Keywords: chronic illness meta-analysis parent–child relationship parenting

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