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Effects of ranolazine on exercise tolerance and HbA1c in patients with chronic angina and diabetes

Effects of ranolazine on exercise tolerance and HbA1c in patients with chronic angina and diabetes Aims The anti-anginal efficacy and safety of ranolazine in diabetic and non-diabetic patients included in the Combination Assessment of Ranolazine In Stable Angina (CARISA) trial (JAMA 2004;291:309) were studied. Glycaemic control was also assessed in CARISA and its long-term open-label extension study.Methods and results Patients with chronic angina enrolled in CARISA (189 with diabetes, 634 without diabetes) on background atenolol, diltiazem, or amlodipine therapy were randomized to placebo, ranolazine 750 or 1000 mg twice daily for 12 weeks, during which exercise tolerance, angina frequency, nitroglycerin usage, glucose, HbA1c, and lipids were measured. Patients completing the randomized study could enroll in an ongoing open-label extension study and were evaluated every 3 months. Ranolazine produced similar improvements in exercise parameters, nitroglycerin use, and angina frequency in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Adverse events were similar between groups. Fasting glucose and lipids remained unaltered in diabetic patients after 12 weeks of therapy. In a post hoc analysis, ranolazine 750 and 1000 mg reduced HbA1c vs. placebo by 0.48±0.18% (P=0.008) and 0.70±0.18% (P=0.0002), respectively; the HbA1c levels appeared to remain unchanged over time during long-term therapy.Conclusion Anti-anginal efficacy and safety of ranolazine for angina were similar between diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Ranolazine significantly improved glycaemic control in diabetic patients. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Heart Journal Oxford University Press

Effects of ranolazine on exercise tolerance and HbA1c in patients with chronic angina and diabetes

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References (20)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The European Society of Cardiology 2005. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org
ISSN
0195-668X
eISSN
1522-9645
DOI
10.1093/eurheartj/ehi495
pmid
16176940
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aims The anti-anginal efficacy and safety of ranolazine in diabetic and non-diabetic patients included in the Combination Assessment of Ranolazine In Stable Angina (CARISA) trial (JAMA 2004;291:309) were studied. Glycaemic control was also assessed in CARISA and its long-term open-label extension study.Methods and results Patients with chronic angina enrolled in CARISA (189 with diabetes, 634 without diabetes) on background atenolol, diltiazem, or amlodipine therapy were randomized to placebo, ranolazine 750 or 1000 mg twice daily for 12 weeks, during which exercise tolerance, angina frequency, nitroglycerin usage, glucose, HbA1c, and lipids were measured. Patients completing the randomized study could enroll in an ongoing open-label extension study and were evaluated every 3 months. Ranolazine produced similar improvements in exercise parameters, nitroglycerin use, and angina frequency in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Adverse events were similar between groups. Fasting glucose and lipids remained unaltered in diabetic patients after 12 weeks of therapy. In a post hoc analysis, ranolazine 750 and 1000 mg reduced HbA1c vs. placebo by 0.48±0.18% (P=0.008) and 0.70±0.18% (P=0.0002), respectively; the HbA1c levels appeared to remain unchanged over time during long-term therapy.Conclusion Anti-anginal efficacy and safety of ranolazine for angina were similar between diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Ranolazine significantly improved glycaemic control in diabetic patients.

Journal

European Heart JournalOxford University Press

Published: Jan 21, 2006

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