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Feminist Thought: Implications for Consumer Research

Feminist Thought: Implications for Consumer Research Abstract This article applies three distinct feminist perspectives to critique scientific objectivity, and the problematics, theories, methods of data collection, and methods of data analysis in consumer research. Each feminist perspective helps heighten sensitivity to gender biases in current research and offers insights on new directions for consumer scholarship. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * Julia Bristor is assistant professor of Marketing, College of Business Administration, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-6283. Eileen Fischer is assistant professor of marketing, Faculty of Administrative Studies, York University, North York, ON M3J 1P3. The authors contributed equally to the development of this article. The helpful comments of Stephen Arnold, Pat Bradshaw, Ida Berger, Roger Heeler, Beth Hirschman, Lisa Peñaloza, Rebecca Reuber, Anju Seth, Barbara Stern, the three reviewers, and Kent Monroe are gratefully acknowledged. © 1993 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Consumer Research Oxford University Press

Feminist Thought: Implications for Consumer Research

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References (76)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1993 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc.
ISSN
0093-5301
eISSN
1537-5277
DOI
10.1086/209320
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This article applies three distinct feminist perspectives to critique scientific objectivity, and the problematics, theories, methods of data collection, and methods of data analysis in consumer research. Each feminist perspective helps heighten sensitivity to gender biases in current research and offers insights on new directions for consumer scholarship. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * Julia Bristor is assistant professor of Marketing, College of Business Administration, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-6283. Eileen Fischer is assistant professor of marketing, Faculty of Administrative Studies, York University, North York, ON M3J 1P3. The authors contributed equally to the development of this article. The helpful comments of Stephen Arnold, Pat Bradshaw, Ida Berger, Roger Heeler, Beth Hirschman, Lisa Peñaloza, Rebecca Reuber, Anju Seth, Barbara Stern, the three reviewers, and Kent Monroe are gratefully acknowledged. © 1993 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc.

Journal

Journal of Consumer ResearchOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1993

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