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Finishing High School and Starting College: Do Catholic Schools Make a Difference?

Finishing High School and Starting College: Do Catholic Schools Make a Difference? Abstract In this paper, we consider two measures of the relative effectiveness of public and Catholic schools: finishing high school and starting college. These measures are potentially more important indicators of school quality than standardized test scores in light of the economic consequences of obtaining more education. Single-equation estimates suggest that for the typical student, attending a Catholic high school raises the probability of finishing high school or entering a four-year college by thirteen percentage points. In bivariate probit models we find almost no evidence that our single-equation estimates are subject to selection bias. * We wish to thank Michael Cheng, Kamala Rajamani, Andrew Kochera, and Sheila Murray for excellent research assistance, and Lawrence Katz and two anonymous referees for helpful comments. We gratefully acknowledge the National Science Foundation which has supported this work under grant SBR9409499. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1995 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Quarterly Journal of Economics Oxford University Press

Finishing High School and Starting College: Do Catholic Schools Make a Difference?

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References (47)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1995 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0033-5533
eISSN
1531-4650
DOI
10.2307/2946645
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In this paper, we consider two measures of the relative effectiveness of public and Catholic schools: finishing high school and starting college. These measures are potentially more important indicators of school quality than standardized test scores in light of the economic consequences of obtaining more education. Single-equation estimates suggest that for the typical student, attending a Catholic high school raises the probability of finishing high school or entering a four-year college by thirteen percentage points. In bivariate probit models we find almost no evidence that our single-equation estimates are subject to selection bias. * We wish to thank Michael Cheng, Kamala Rajamani, Andrew Kochera, and Sheila Murray for excellent research assistance, and Lawrence Katz and two anonymous referees for helpful comments. We gratefully acknowledge the National Science Foundation which has supported this work under grant SBR9409499. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1995 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Journal

The Quarterly Journal of EconomicsOxford University Press

Published: Nov 1, 1995

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