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Gender Differences in Policy Preferences: A Summary of Trends from the 1960s to the 1980s

Gender Differences in Policy Preferences: A Summary of Trends from the 1960s to the 1980s Abstract Using 267 repeated policy questions (962 time points), we examine gender differences in policy choices and how they have changed from the 1960s to the 1980s. The average gender difference in preferences toward policies involving the use of force have consistently been moderately large. Sex differences in opinion toward other policies—regulation and public protection, “compassion” issues, traditional values—have been approximately half as large but they also warrant more attention than in the past. Our analysis suggests that the salience of issues has increased greatly for women, and as a result differences in preferences have increased in ways consistent with the interests of women and the intentions of the women's movement. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes " Robert Y. Shapiro is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Columbia University and a Research Associate at NORC, University of Chicago. Harpreet Mahajan is a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at Columbia University. The authors owe special thanks to Kurt Veith for his collaboration in some of the research reported here. They are also grateful to Ethel Klein, Eleanor Singer, Ester Fuchs, Eric Smith, Tom Smith, Chaim Eyal, Benjamin Page, Garth Taylor, and the anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments and suggestions. The survey data and tabulations were obtained from the files of the Policy Change and Public Opinion Change project at NORC, which was originally supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. SES-7912969. Support for the research reported here was provided by the Columbia Council for Research in the Social Sciences; the responsibility for analysis and interpretation is the authors'. An earlier version of this article was presented at the 1984 Annual Meeting of the Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research, Chicago, Illinois. © 1986, the American Association for Public Opinion Research http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Opinion Quarterly Oxford University Press

Gender Differences in Policy Preferences: A Summary of Trends from the 1960s to the 1980s

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References (19)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1986, the American Association for Public Opinion Research
ISSN
0033-362X
eISSN
1537-5331
DOI
10.1086/268958
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Using 267 repeated policy questions (962 time points), we examine gender differences in policy choices and how they have changed from the 1960s to the 1980s. The average gender difference in preferences toward policies involving the use of force have consistently been moderately large. Sex differences in opinion toward other policies—regulation and public protection, “compassion” issues, traditional values—have been approximately half as large but they also warrant more attention than in the past. Our analysis suggests that the salience of issues has increased greatly for women, and as a result differences in preferences have increased in ways consistent with the interests of women and the intentions of the women's movement. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes " Robert Y. Shapiro is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Columbia University and a Research Associate at NORC, University of Chicago. Harpreet Mahajan is a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at Columbia University. The authors owe special thanks to Kurt Veith for his collaboration in some of the research reported here. They are also grateful to Ethel Klein, Eleanor Singer, Ester Fuchs, Eric Smith, Tom Smith, Chaim Eyal, Benjamin Page, Garth Taylor, and the anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments and suggestions. The survey data and tabulations were obtained from the files of the Policy Change and Public Opinion Change project at NORC, which was originally supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. SES-7912969. Support for the research reported here was provided by the Columbia Council for Research in the Social Sciences; the responsibility for analysis and interpretation is the authors'. An earlier version of this article was presented at the 1984 Annual Meeting of the Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research, Chicago, Illinois. © 1986, the American Association for Public Opinion Research

Journal

Public Opinion QuarterlyOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1986

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