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Glyoxylate Transamination in Intact Leaf Peroxisomes

Glyoxylate Transamination in Intact Leaf Peroxisomes Abstract Intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf peroxisomes were supplied with glycolate and one to three of the amino acids serine, glutamate, and alanine, and the amount of the respective α-keto acids formed in glyoxylate transamination was assayed. At 1 millimolar glycolate and 1 millimolar each of the three amino acids in combination, the transamination reaction reached saturation; reduction of either glycolate or amino acid concentration decreased the activity. The relative serine, glutamate, and alanine transamination at equal amino acid concentrations was roughly 40, 30, and 30%, respectively. The three amino acids exhibited mutual inhibition to one another in transamination due to the competition for the supply of glyoxylate. In addition to this competition for glyoxylate, competitive inhibition at the active site of enzymes occurred between glutamate and alanine, but not between serine and glutamate or alanine. Alteration of the relative concentrations of the three amino acids changed their relative transamination. Similar work was performed with intact oat (Avena sativa L.) leaf peroxisomes. At 1 millimolar of each of the three amino acids in combination, the relative serine, glutamate, and alanine transamination was roughly 60, 23, and 17%, respectively. Similarly, alteration of the relative concentration of the three amino acids changed their relative transamination. The contents of the three amino acids in leaf extracts were analyzed, and the relative contribution of the three amino acids in glycine production in photorespiration was assessed and discussed. 2 Present address: Botany Institute, Academia Sinica, Peking. 1 Supported by United States Department of Agriculture 83CRCR11298. Dedicated to Professor Harry Beevers on his 60th birthday. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1984 American Society of Plant Biologists This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Physiology Oxford University Press

Glyoxylate Transamination in Intact Leaf Peroxisomes

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References (15)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2021 American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
0032-0889
eISSN
1532-2548
DOI
10.1104/pp.75.1.7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf peroxisomes were supplied with glycolate and one to three of the amino acids serine, glutamate, and alanine, and the amount of the respective α-keto acids formed in glyoxylate transamination was assayed. At 1 millimolar glycolate and 1 millimolar each of the three amino acids in combination, the transamination reaction reached saturation; reduction of either glycolate or amino acid concentration decreased the activity. The relative serine, glutamate, and alanine transamination at equal amino acid concentrations was roughly 40, 30, and 30%, respectively. The three amino acids exhibited mutual inhibition to one another in transamination due to the competition for the supply of glyoxylate. In addition to this competition for glyoxylate, competitive inhibition at the active site of enzymes occurred between glutamate and alanine, but not between serine and glutamate or alanine. Alteration of the relative concentrations of the three amino acids changed their relative transamination. Similar work was performed with intact oat (Avena sativa L.) leaf peroxisomes. At 1 millimolar of each of the three amino acids in combination, the relative serine, glutamate, and alanine transamination was roughly 60, 23, and 17%, respectively. Similarly, alteration of the relative concentration of the three amino acids changed their relative transamination. The contents of the three amino acids in leaf extracts were analyzed, and the relative contribution of the three amino acids in glycine production in photorespiration was assessed and discussed. 2 Present address: Botany Institute, Academia Sinica, Peking. 1 Supported by United States Department of Agriculture 83CRCR11298. Dedicated to Professor Harry Beevers on his 60th birthday. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1984 American Society of Plant Biologists This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Journal

Plant PhysiologyOxford University Press

Published: May 1, 1984

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