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Hotspots: Earth's Biologically Richest and Most Endangered Terrestrial Ecoregions

Hotspots: Earth's Biologically Richest and Most Endangered Terrestrial Ecoregions 630 JOURNAL OF MAMMALOGY Vol. 83, No. 2 alone—an area larger than Mexico (Bryant et al. 1997). In this murky situation, we have no choice except to protect forests that are known to harbor a maximum diversity of species. Hotspots is timely, and it highlights the on- going struggle to save endangered terrestrial habitats that are home to numerous endemic spe- cies. The editors have compiled data with assis- tance from 100 specialists, 72 of whom are con- tributors to this volume. One drawback of the book is that it would have been much easier for readers to browse specific topics if the editors had provided a subject index. Common names provided in the text do not always coincide with those suggested by Wilson and Cole (2000), but otherwise, Hotspots is well written and easily readable for both professional and nonprofes- sional biologists. This book highlights 25 biodiversity hotspots that cover about 2% of Earth’s land surface, yet represent 50% of all terrestrial species diversity. Norman Myers is one of the few visionaries who alerted the world to the loss of biodiversity by coining the catch phrase ‘‘biodiversity hot- spots.’’ Over a decade ago, he identified 10 trop- ical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Mammalogy Oxford University Press

Hotspots: Earth's Biologically Richest and Most Endangered Terrestrial Ecoregions

Journal of Mammalogy , Volume 83 (2) – May 1, 2002

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References (6)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0022-2372
eISSN
1545-1542
DOI
10.1644/1545-1542(2002)083<0630:>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

630 JOURNAL OF MAMMALOGY Vol. 83, No. 2 alone—an area larger than Mexico (Bryant et al. 1997). In this murky situation, we have no choice except to protect forests that are known to harbor a maximum diversity of species. Hotspots is timely, and it highlights the on- going struggle to save endangered terrestrial habitats that are home to numerous endemic spe- cies. The editors have compiled data with assis- tance from 100 specialists, 72 of whom are con- tributors to this volume. One drawback of the book is that it would have been much easier for readers to browse specific topics if the editors had provided a subject index. Common names provided in the text do not always coincide with those suggested by Wilson and Cole (2000), but otherwise, Hotspots is well written and easily readable for both professional and nonprofes- sional biologists. This book highlights 25 biodiversity hotspots that cover about 2% of Earth’s land surface, yet represent 50% of all terrestrial species diversity. Norman Myers is one of the few visionaries who alerted the world to the loss of biodiversity by coining the catch phrase ‘‘biodiversity hot- spots.’’ Over a decade ago, he identified 10 trop- ical

Journal

Journal of MammalogyOxford University Press

Published: May 1, 2002

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