Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

How Individuals' Cherished Possessions Become Families' Inalienable Wealth

How Individuals' Cherished Possessions Become Families' Inalienable Wealth This article examines a special category of objects, things that people should not give or sell, but keep from generation to generation within the close confines of a group—inalienable wealth. Previous findings about inalienable wealth are restricted to studies of indigenous cultures by anthropologists. We explore whether and how objects pass from alienable to inalienable status across generations of middle-class North American families. Our research distinguishes families' inalienable wealth from individuals' cherished possessions and keepsakes in terms of the role of caretakers, the behavioral dynamics of guardianship, temporal orientation, shared significance, and distinctive semiotic qualities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Consumer Research Oxford University Press

How Individuals' Cherished Possessions Become Families' Inalienable Wealth

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/how-individuals-cherished-possessions-become-families-inalienable-MBeEUUX6CD

References (40)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2004 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc.
ISSN
0093-5301
eISSN
1537-5277
DOI
10.1086/425096
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article examines a special category of objects, things that people should not give or sell, but keep from generation to generation within the close confines of a group—inalienable wealth. Previous findings about inalienable wealth are restricted to studies of indigenous cultures by anthropologists. We explore whether and how objects pass from alienable to inalienable status across generations of middle-class North American families. Our research distinguishes families' inalienable wealth from individuals' cherished possessions and keepsakes in terms of the role of caretakers, the behavioral dynamics of guardianship, temporal orientation, shared significance, and distinctive semiotic qualities.

Journal

Journal of Consumer ResearchOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.