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Identifying the Sources of Local Productivity Growth

Identifying the Sources of Local Productivity Growth AbstractUsing firm-level based TFP indicators (as opposed to employment-based proxies) we estimate the effects of alternative sources of dynamic externalities at the local level. In contrast to previous empirical work, we find that industrial specialization and scale indicators affect TFP growth positively, while neither product variety nor the degree of local competition have any effect. Employment-based regressions yield nearly the opposite results, in line with most of previous empirical work. We argue that such regressions suffer from serious identification problems when interpreted as evidence of dynamic externalities. Our results question the conclusions of most of the existing literature on dynamic agglomeration economies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the European Economic Association Oxford University Press

Identifying the Sources of Local Productivity Growth

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References (15)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2004 by the European Economic Association
ISSN
1542-4766
eISSN
1542-4774
DOI
10.1162/1542476041423322
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractUsing firm-level based TFP indicators (as opposed to employment-based proxies) we estimate the effects of alternative sources of dynamic externalities at the local level. In contrast to previous empirical work, we find that industrial specialization and scale indicators affect TFP growth positively, while neither product variety nor the degree of local competition have any effect. Employment-based regressions yield nearly the opposite results, in line with most of previous empirical work. We argue that such regressions suffer from serious identification problems when interpreted as evidence of dynamic externalities. Our results question the conclusions of most of the existing literature on dynamic agglomeration economies.

Journal

Journal of the European Economic AssociationOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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