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Importance of work environments on hospital outcomes in nine countries

Importance of work environments on hospital outcomes in nine countries PurposeTo determine the effect of hospital work environments on hospital outcomes across multiple countries.DesignPrimary survey data using a common instrument were collected from separate cross sections of 98 116 bedside care nurses practising in 1406 hospitals in 9 countries between 1999 and 2009.Main Outcome MeasuresNurse burnout and job dissatisfaction, patient readiness for hospital discharge and quality of patient care.ResultsHigh nurse burnout was found in hospitals in all countries except Germany, and ranged from roughly a third of nurses to about 60% of nurses in South Korea and Japan. Job dissatisfaction among nurses was close to 20% in most countries and as high as 60% in Japan. Close to half or more of nurses in every country lacked confidence that patients could care for themselves following discharge. Quality-of-care rated as fair or poor varied from 11% in Canada to 68% in South Korea. Between one-quarter and one-third of hospitals in each country were judged to have poor work environments. Working in a hospital with a better work environment was associated with significantly lower odds of nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction and with better quality-of-care outcomes.ConclusionsPoor hospital work environments are common and are associated with negative outcomes for nurses and quality of care. Improving work environments holds promise for nurse retention and better quality of patient care. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal for Quality in Health Care Oxford University Press

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References (49)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved
Subject
Papers
ISSN
1353-4505
eISSN
1464-3677
DOI
10.1093/intqhc/mzr022
pmid
21561979
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeTo determine the effect of hospital work environments on hospital outcomes across multiple countries.DesignPrimary survey data using a common instrument were collected from separate cross sections of 98 116 bedside care nurses practising in 1406 hospitals in 9 countries between 1999 and 2009.Main Outcome MeasuresNurse burnout and job dissatisfaction, patient readiness for hospital discharge and quality of patient care.ResultsHigh nurse burnout was found in hospitals in all countries except Germany, and ranged from roughly a third of nurses to about 60% of nurses in South Korea and Japan. Job dissatisfaction among nurses was close to 20% in most countries and as high as 60% in Japan. Close to half or more of nurses in every country lacked confidence that patients could care for themselves following discharge. Quality-of-care rated as fair or poor varied from 11% in Canada to 68% in South Korea. Between one-quarter and one-third of hospitals in each country were judged to have poor work environments. Working in a hospital with a better work environment was associated with significantly lower odds of nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction and with better quality-of-care outcomes.ConclusionsPoor hospital work environments are common and are associated with negative outcomes for nurses and quality of care. Improving work environments holds promise for nurse retention and better quality of patient care.

Journal

International Journal for Quality in Health CareOxford University Press

Published: Aug 11, 2011

Keywords: Hospital work environments nurse burnout nurse job satisfaction and quality of care

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