Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Income Inequality and Health: What Have We Learned So Far?

Income Inequality and Health: What Have We Learned So Far? Epidemiologic Reviews Vol. 26, 2004 Copyright © 2004 by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Printed in U.S.A. All rights reserved DOI: 10.1093/epirev/mxh003 S. V. Subramanian and Ichiro Kawachi From the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Received for publication November 3, 2003; accepted for publication December 19, 2003. Abbreviation: OR, odds ratio. INTRODUCTION the Gini coefficient of income distribution at the US state level) and poor health (e.g., measured by age-adjusted Many developed countries have experienced a sharp rise mortality rates within each state) may reflect either a contex- in income inequality during the past three decades, and the tual effect of income inequality on health, or a compositional United States is no exception (1). For example, the average effect of income-poor individuals residing in unequal states, annual salary in America in inflation-adjusted 1998 dollars or both. In attempts to overcome this methodological limita- increased from $32,522 in 1970 to $35,864 in 1999, that is, a tion of ecologic studies, researchers have published nearly modest 10 percent increase over three decades. By contrast two dozen multilevel studies of income inequality and over the same period, the average annual http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Epidemiologic Reviews Oxford University Press

Income Inequality and Health: What Have We Learned So Far?

Epidemiologic Reviews , Volume 26 (1) – Jul 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/income-inequality-and-health-what-have-we-learned-so-far-jjvfxJ0pWD

References (81)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0193-936X
eISSN
1478-6729
DOI
10.1093/epirev/mxh003
pmid
15234949
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Epidemiologic Reviews Vol. 26, 2004 Copyright © 2004 by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Printed in U.S.A. All rights reserved DOI: 10.1093/epirev/mxh003 S. V. Subramanian and Ichiro Kawachi From the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Received for publication November 3, 2003; accepted for publication December 19, 2003. Abbreviation: OR, odds ratio. INTRODUCTION the Gini coefficient of income distribution at the US state level) and poor health (e.g., measured by age-adjusted Many developed countries have experienced a sharp rise mortality rates within each state) may reflect either a contex- in income inequality during the past three decades, and the tual effect of income inequality on health, or a compositional United States is no exception (1). For example, the average effect of income-poor individuals residing in unequal states, annual salary in America in inflation-adjusted 1998 dollars or both. In attempts to overcome this methodological limita- increased from $32,522 in 1970 to $35,864 in 1999, that is, a tion of ecologic studies, researchers have published nearly modest 10 percent increase over three decades. By contrast two dozen multilevel studies of income inequality and over the same period, the average annual

Journal

Epidemiologic ReviewsOxford University Press

Published: Jul 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.