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Infectious Complications of Tattoos

Infectious Complications of Tattoos Abstract Tattooing carries several medical risks, including the transmission of infectious diseases. We review the published literature on the transmission of hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus, Treponema pallidum, papillomavirus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and other organisms by tattooing. Education, through public health measures, should promote the prevention of infectious disease transmission. Particular populations who could benefit from education include prisoners, individuals involved with correctional facilities, youths, military personnel, and health care providers coming in contact with populations at risk for tattoos. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * Current address: Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. © 1994 by The University of Chicago http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Infectious Diseases Oxford University Press

Infectious Complications of Tattoos

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References (82)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1994 by The University of Chicago
ISSN
1058-4838
eISSN
1537-6591
DOI
10.1093/clinids/18.4.610
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Tattooing carries several medical risks, including the transmission of infectious diseases. We review the published literature on the transmission of hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus, Treponema pallidum, papillomavirus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and other organisms by tattooing. Education, through public health measures, should promote the prevention of infectious disease transmission. Particular populations who could benefit from education include prisoners, individuals involved with correctional facilities, youths, military personnel, and health care providers coming in contact with populations at risk for tattoos. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * Current address: Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. © 1994 by The University of Chicago

Journal

Clinical Infectious DiseasesOxford University Press

Published: Apr 1, 1994

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