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Interleukin-10 and the immune response against cancer: a counterpoint

Interleukin-10 and the immune response against cancer: a counterpoint Although interleukin-10 (IL-10) is commonly regarded as an anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive cytokine that favors tumor escape from immune surveillance, a wealth of evidence is accumulating that IL-10 also possesses some immunostimulating properties. In fact, IL-10 has the pleiotropic ability of influencing positively and negatively the function of innate and adaptive immunity in different experimental models, which makes it questionable to merely categorize this cytokine as a target of anti-immune escape therapeutic strategies or rather, as an immunological adjuvant in the fight against cancer. Here, we review available data about the immunostimulating anticancer properties of IL-10, and in particular, we focus on the hypothesis that in contrast to what occurs in secondary lymphoid organs, IL-10 overexpression within the tumor microenvironment may catalyze cancer immune rejection. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Leukocyte Biology Oxford University Press

Interleukin-10 and the immune response against cancer: a counterpoint

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References (156)

Copyright
© 2005 Society for Leukocyte Biology
eISSN
1938-3673
DOI
10.1189/jlb.0705358
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although interleukin-10 (IL-10) is commonly regarded as an anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive cytokine that favors tumor escape from immune surveillance, a wealth of evidence is accumulating that IL-10 also possesses some immunostimulating properties. In fact, IL-10 has the pleiotropic ability of influencing positively and negatively the function of innate and adaptive immunity in different experimental models, which makes it questionable to merely categorize this cytokine as a target of anti-immune escape therapeutic strategies or rather, as an immunological adjuvant in the fight against cancer. Here, we review available data about the immunostimulating anticancer properties of IL-10, and in particular, we focus on the hypothesis that in contrast to what occurs in secondary lymphoid organs, IL-10 overexpression within the tumor microenvironment may catalyze cancer immune rejection.

Journal

Journal of Leukocyte BiologyOxford University Press

Published: Oct 4, 2005

Keywords: tumor-infiltrating macrophages; natural killer cell; tumor-associated antigen; tumor immunology; cytokine

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