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Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men

Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men Abstract Using longitudinal data, we study the processes of job mobility and wage growth among young men. During the first ten years in the labor market, a typical worker will hold seven jobs, about two thirds of his career total. The evolution of wages plays a key role in this transition to stable employment: wage gains at job changes account for at least a third of early-career wage growth, and the wage is the key determinant of job changing decisions among young workers. Job changing is a critical component of workers' movement toward the stable employment relations of mature careers. * " We acknowledge partial research support from the United States Department of Labor. Points of view or opinions expressed here are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the official position of the Department of Labor. Topel also acknowledges financial support from the National Science Foundation. John Abowd, Gary Becker, Dale Mortensen, Kevin Murphy, Melvin Reder, Sherwin Rosen, and David Ross provided valuable comments. We also thank seminar participants at the University of Chicago, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New York University, and the University of Toronto. David Ross and Brooks Pierce provided very capable assistance. Remaining errors are ours. Working data sets used in this paper are available from the University of Michigan archives. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1992 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Quarterly Journal of Economics Oxford University Press

Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men

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References (40)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1992 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College
ISSN
0033-5533
eISSN
1531-4650
DOI
10.2307/2118478
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Using longitudinal data, we study the processes of job mobility and wage growth among young men. During the first ten years in the labor market, a typical worker will hold seven jobs, about two thirds of his career total. The evolution of wages plays a key role in this transition to stable employment: wage gains at job changes account for at least a third of early-career wage growth, and the wage is the key determinant of job changing decisions among young workers. Job changing is a critical component of workers' movement toward the stable employment relations of mature careers. * " We acknowledge partial research support from the United States Department of Labor. Points of view or opinions expressed here are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the official position of the Department of Labor. Topel also acknowledges financial support from the National Science Foundation. John Abowd, Gary Becker, Dale Mortensen, Kevin Murphy, Melvin Reder, Sherwin Rosen, and David Ross provided valuable comments. We also thank seminar participants at the University of Chicago, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New York University, and the University of Toronto. David Ross and Brooks Pierce provided very capable assistance. Remaining errors are ours. Working data sets used in this paper are available from the University of Michigan archives. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1992 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College

Journal

The Quarterly Journal of EconomicsOxford University Press

Published: May 1, 1992

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