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Morphological Diversity of the Humerus of the South American Subterranean Rodent Ctenomys (Rodentia, Ctenomyidae)

Morphological Diversity of the Humerus of the South American Subterranean Rodent Ctenomys... Humeral variation associated with digging ability in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys was analyzed through 6 functionally significant indexes. The humerus of some extinct and living species was slightly more specialized than that of fossorial octodontoids †Actenomys and Octodon, whereas it was highly specialized in some living species. The constant occurrence of greater epicondyles suggests a hierarchical pattern in the acquisition of scratch-digging specializations. A possible relationship between humeral morphological diversity and environments is preliminarily discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Mammalogy Oxford University Press

Morphological Diversity of the Humerus of the South American Subterranean Rodent Ctenomys (Rodentia, Ctenomyidae)

Journal of Mammalogy , Volume 87 (6) – Dec 29, 2006

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References (53)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2006 American Society of Mammalogists
ISSN
0022-2372
eISSN
1545-1542
DOI
10.1644/06-MAMM-A-033R1.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Humeral variation associated with digging ability in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys was analyzed through 6 functionally significant indexes. The humerus of some extinct and living species was slightly more specialized than that of fossorial octodontoids †Actenomys and Octodon, whereas it was highly specialized in some living species. The constant occurrence of greater epicondyles suggests a hierarchical pattern in the acquisition of scratch-digging specializations. A possible relationship between humeral morphological diversity and environments is preliminarily discussed.

Journal

Journal of MammalogyOxford University Press

Published: Dec 29, 2006

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